Classics and Music move to Arts Centre

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Over the last few weeks UC Classics and UC Music have been relocating into the restored Chemistry building, at the Arts Centre of Christchurchformerly the University’s campus until the 1970s.

The Chemistry building has been transformed into a purpose-built space over four floors. It features music practice suites, a recital space, a small lecture theatre and library, offices for Classics and Music staff, student workstations and a social area.

Some classes and music recitals are already running in the new space, and weekly Composition Workshops and New Music concerts are held each Monday which are free to attend. Friday lunchtime concerts will also start soon.

A new exhibition space, the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities, is due to open in late May. The museum will showcase UC’s highly valuable James Logie Memorial Collection, allowing greater public access to view the treasured collection of Greek, Roman, Egyptian and Near Eastern artefacts.

The move  provides more public performance opportunities for Music students and puts UC’s Classics and Music departments in the ideal location for greater collaboration with the local and international arts community.

The building, along with the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities, will be officially opened in late May.

Information for those travelling between UC and the Arts Centre is available here.

*All images supplied by Warren and Mahoney, photographer Sarah Rowlands.

Public will be able to attend music performances held in the new recital space.

Recital Room

The entrance to the Chemistry building (from the South Quad) has been restored to its former glory.

Entrance

The new student social space in the loft (right) and new learning spaces.

Interior rooms

Stairs – a blend of the old and the new.

Stairs

Don’t be shy! Patua te whakamā!

ASCThe term will be over before you know it, and if you could use help with:

  • Exam prep
  • Grammar
  • Report & essay writing
  • Improving your English
  • Time management
  • Oral presentations

check out the Academic Skills Centre (ASC). We can give you feedback on your work, help you unpack a tricky question, or discuss how to optimise your study time.

Shania is a 4th year student at UC studying Human Services and Criminal Justice. In her words, “every time I come, everyone’s really friendly and I don’t feel silly asking anything because they’re always really helpful. I come out of it with confidence because they always give me guidance and the key steps to go from”.

Click here for more information or you can pop into level 3, Puaka-James Hight, or ring on 369 3900. We’re open during term break too.

A plant-based diet for the environment?

VCUC is the University of Canterbury’s vege club. VCUC is a student club for people interested in animal rights, environmentalism, and plant-based diets. They discuss the importance of adopting a less meat- and dairy-based diet – and how to make that shift! By VCUC. 

CO2 output of animal agriculture is massive

After reading an article by The Guardian shared by the UC Sustainability Community, about reducing the consumption of animal products to help save the world from climate change, we got quite excited because VCUC is all about eating more plant-based.

There is some debate about the exact numbers of greenhouse gases produced by the animal agriculture industry. However, animal agriculture is still a bigger contributor than any other human related activity, including all forms of transport (planes, container ships etc.). We also cannot forget it is the biggest use of fresh water and land, creates the most waste, deforestation and extinction than any other human activity.

Based on New Zealand Data of 2008: Image credit Science Media Centre

Based on New Zealand Data of 2008: Image credit Science Media Centre

Small steps, big effects

How can you help? Often environmental problems are posed to us as something too big or complex for you to make a change. But there are many small choices made every day that can make a difference. VCUC has some helpful tips.

Many members of VCUC live and thrive off a plant-based diet. Many plant-based diets consist of staples such as fruit, vegetables, grains and legumes. Many find the thought of changing to a plant-based diet too overwhelming to do overnight and that is normal. A long term method is to slowly reduce your consumption of animal products while simultaneously increasing the number of plant-based foods. For example, swapping meat for beans, in say nachos is an easy option. (Check out this great wee video for a quick nutritional comparison of meat vs. beans!) Other people adopt a plant-based day once a week or incorporate one plant-based meal a day. Try what works for you and remember every plant-based meal is a great achievement and it is never too late to start.

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Cheap and easy

A lot of plant-based foods are the cheapest a student can buy in New Zealand. Buying grains (e.g. oats, rice), long shelf life starches (e.g. potatoes, kumara etc.) and legumes can be very cheap. You can buy them bulk and in their dried form (for legumes) for a much cheaper deal. We all know that fruits and vegetables are the healthiest food for us to consume and there are a number of ways to get them cheap:

  • Buy seasonal and ask the shops if they do deals on bulk buys
  • Do not forget the frozen section for bags of fruit and vegetables
  • Explore the weekend markets (Riccarton, Opawa, Lyttelton, ect.)
  • Check out vege box schemes in Christchurch (just google it for options). Sharing it with your flatmates makes this a cheap option
  • Many fruits and vegetables can be frozen if you have surplus and can’t eat them all before they go off
  • Fruit can be foraged for free, keep your eyes out for trees around the city to pick from. (Make sure you are allowed to do so.)
  • Community gardens are a great place for cheap vegetables. If you volunteer at UC’s community gardens you can take some vegetables home for free!
  • There are also co-ops where you pay a set price for a box of fruit and vegetables, that often gets delivered. Check out vege box schemes in Christchurch (just google it for options). Sharing it with your flatmates makes this a cheap option. Salt and Light is the University one.

And finally, the least environmentally detrimental way is to grow your own. You will be amazed at how much you can grow in a small space, plus you could sell or trade the excess! Get in contact with UC Kakariki for some tips.

A plant-based recipe: Easy bean fajitas

Ingredients

  • 1 can No Fat Refried Beans
  • 1 can Low Sodium Pinto Beans
  • ¼ cup Salsa
  • 1 Onion, sliced into strips
  • 1 Bell Pepper, sliced into strips or other vegetables of your choice
  • 2 teaspoons Fajita Spice Mix (below)
  • Tortillas

Fajita Spice Mix

  • 1 tablespoons corn starch
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Instructions

  1. Drain and rinse the pinto beans.
  2. Add salsa and refried beans and simmer until warm.
  3. Whisk all Spice Mix ingredients in a small bowl.
  4. Stir-fry onion, pepper (vegetables), and 2 tsp of Spice Mix in water
  5. Continue stir-frying until liquid evaporates and veggies begin to brown
  6. Assemble fajitas by placing beans in center of tortilla.
  7. Add stir-fry veggies and toppings of your choice.
  8. Roll and enjoy!

We understand that there are still many things left untouched in this blog and you are more than welcome to contact us at vegclubofuc@gmail.com or our Facebook pages https://www.facebook.com/groups/ucvegclub/ https://www.facebook.com/ucvegclub/ for any questions you have or for more information.

This message was brought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Connect with us through Facebook or Instagram. Or email us: sustainability@canterbury.ac.nz

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