Myth-buster: Postgrad isn’t fun

Emma McCone is a postgraduate student studying towards a Master’s of Science, she shares her journey into postgrad study.

I finished the third and final year of my bachelors degree feeling like I wasn’t ready for a full-time job and the real deal adult life. I fell into postgraduate study and enrolled for a Master’s of Science. If you learn one thing from me and this blog, make it that postgraduate study can be for anyone who’s just passionate about what they’re learning and prepared to stay at uni a few years longer.

I learnt about postgrad after meeting some friends the year above me who’d just started their Masters. Second key message: postgrads aren’t scary, they’re not a different species and if you spend some time getting to know some in your department, you may find you have a lot more in common than you thought.

Once I’d met people and started the discussion about what postgrad is actually like, everything else fell into place. I talked to them more and more about the things they got to do during their Masters, I actually had conversations with lecturers and they knew my first name. All of a sudden everything seemed much more achievable and easy.

Just know that if you’re finding yourself towards the end of your degree and not sure what on earth to do with yourself, postgrad is not just for the straight A+ students. I am living proof of a student who just wasn’t ready to let go and move into the big scary world of full time work, smart casual dress and pretending to be an adult. I love what I study and I’m enjoying my Master’s degree so much. I’m so excited about having at least another two Tea Party costumes and memories to come. I love being a student and always meeting new and exciting people.

Maybe at the end of this degree, I’ll be grown up and ready! I guess there’s always a PhD if not….

Sell yourself for free stuff – volunteer on Open Day

The Events and Partnerships team are seeking enthusiastic volunteers to sell themselves for free stuff and help potential students have the best Open Day experience possible. There are only 16 spots left so get in quick!

2017 Orientation Day, 15.2.17 Engineering Core, Law and Commerce in A1,2,3. Mini donut giveaway, Arts College in C1, Musicians, Welcome arch, Library Silent Disco. Market, UC tote bag, #UC Now instagram frame, Orimarket, Cantabs girls,

We need you to volunteer in the following areas:

Information Guru (Campus Ambassadors)
Providing help and support is your gig.

There will be a special station for you on Open Day. You’ll assist visitors with questions like ‘where will I get a good coffee?’ and ‘what time is the next info session?’ You’ll also monitor sessions taking place in your area.

Campus Explorer (Tour Guide)
You know the campus well and can’t wait to show it off.

We need you to lead small groups of visitors on a loop of the campus, pointing out all the key buildings and facilities and answering questions. We’ll make sure you know where activities are taking place during the day so you can point them out and help our visitors feel comfortable on campus.

FREE stuff: For your trouble you get a cool tee shirt to wear (and keep), a drink bottle, your choice of finger-less gloves or a beanie and all the tea, coffee and hot chocolate you can drink from the volunteer’s kitchen.

Volunteer by filling out the form here>

If you have any questions email the Events team at events@canterbury.ac.nz

Rhodes Scholarship transformative

Andrew Dean received a Rhodes Scholarship in November 2011, after completing a B. A. (Hons) in English at the University of Canterbury. Read more about his transformative experience.

I began at Oxford in October 2012 and I read for a one year masters in 20th Century Literature; from 2013–2017 I read for a doctorate in English, focusing on post-1945 fiction.

The scholarship has been a transformative experience for me. My masters course opened my intellectual horizons. During the doctoral thesis, I have been supervised and examined by a number of remarkable scholars. It has been with the support of the scholarship, too, that I’ve had the time and funding to write in a more public way about literature and politics.

Rhodes Scholars have many different experiences coming into their time at Oxford, and take many different paths through their time there. It is unusual in that it offers support to undertake almost any course, from a second BA to a doctoral thesis. Rhodes House itself endeavours to create a community of scholars from all over the world. I couldn’t have asked for a more stimulating environment in which to study and work.

Interested in applying? The closing date for applications is 1 August so start thinking and preparing now. Click here for more information.

DEAN,Andrew_Rhodes Scholar- photo_ copyright Andrew Dean web res

Andrew in front of the Radcliffe Camera (a library) in Oxford.

Background to Rhodes Scholarships

  • Rhodes’ 1903 Will outlined four criteria to be used in the election of Scholars:
  • “literary and scholastic attainments;
  • the energy to use one’s talents to the full;
  • truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship; and
  • moral force of character and instincts to lead, and to take an interest in one’s fellow beings.”
  • Up to three graduates are selected from New Zealand each year. To be eligible they must be either residents or citizens, have spent at least five of the previous ten years in New Zealand, and aged between 19 and of 25. Read more about eligibility here.
  • Globally a total of up to 95 scholars are selected from Australia, Bermuda, Canada, China, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Jamaica & the Commonwealth Caribbean, Kenya, Malaysia, Pakistan, Southern Africa (including South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia and Swaziland)SJLP (including Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine), United Arab Emirates, United States, West Africa(from 2018), Zambia and Zimbabwe as well as New Zealand.
  • In New Zealand, the Scholarships are supported in partnership with the Robertson Foundation. Internationally the Rhodes Trust provides the Rhodes Scholarships in partnership with the Second Century Founder, John McCall MacBain and other benefactors
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