Measles update

The number of confirmed measles cases in Canterbury has now reached 30.

Measles is a serious and highly infectious illness that spreads easily from person to person through the air, and can be caught simply by being in the same room as someone with measles.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms are usually a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery eyes, and sometimes small white spots in the mouth. Over the next few days a blotchy rash appears, starting on the face and behind the ears, and moving down the body.

If you develop any of these symptoms stay at home and phone the UC Health Centre if you are enrolled there or your General Practitioner (GP) for advice as soon as possible.   

Immunisation

  • If you have had two doses of the measles vaccine (MMR – Mumps, Measles and Rubella), have had the measles before, or were born before 1969 you are unlikely to develop the measles.
  • Those born between 1969 and 1990 are considered to have a good level of protection. This group were offered one measles vaccine and evidence suggests that one dose of MMR protects 95% of people from developing measles.
  • If you’re not sure if you’ve been immunised for measles, contact your health service provider – they can check your vaccination history.

Priority group for vaccination
To ensure vaccines are being provided to those in greatest need, a vaccination programme is being rolled out by general practices which prioritises those who need it most.  

The immediate priority is those aged 12 months to 28 years who have never been immunised. As more vaccine becomes available the MMR vaccine will be made available to other priority groups.

If you are enrolled at the UC Health Centre, meet the criteria for vaccination and have not yet been contacted, please call the UC Health Centre to book in for your MMR vaccine. Otherwise please contact your General Practitioner (GP).

Free bus service to the Christchurch vigil

The Christchurch Vigil, Remember Those Who Lost Their Lives, is being hosted in Hagley Park on Sunday 24 March, 5pm – 7pm.

UCSA President Sam Brosnahan will be speaking at the event.

UC, SVA and UCSA are working together to provide a free bus service to get UC students to and from the Vigil*. Register here to book your seat.

Buses will leave from the Foundry car park and there are four departure times. Please arrive 15 minutes before your scheduled departure time to grab a wristband and hop on the bus.

Departure times

  • 3.15pm
  • 3.30pm
  • 3.45pm
  • 3.55pm

Buses will leave the Vigil at 7.30pm and return students to the Foundry car park.

*Christchurch City Council are expecting in crowds in excess of 100,000 people to attend the vigil, and recommend bus transportation as parking cannot be guaranteed.

Please take a moment to reserve your seat today

Tips to spot a phishing scam

Can you imagine the headache you’d have if a hacker got access to your social media, banking, dating, or email login details? But you wouldn’t just hand this kind of information over to a stranger would you?

Hmm, here are some basic tips to spotting a scam.

Consider these before opening an email that you weren’t expecting to receive.

  • Is the spelling and grammar in the message correct?
  • Does the link and the text match (hover your mouse over the link and you’ll see where it really goes).
  • Does the email urge you to take immediate action?
  • Does the email address of the sender look reasonable given the content of the email?
  • Look at the salutation (does it say ‘Dear Customer’)?
  • Look at the signature, a lack of details or how you can contact the company suggests phishing.
  • Are you even expecting an email from that sender?
  • Is the message asking you to do something unusual? (eg. buy iTunes cards).

Together we can make a difference, but what should you do next?

If you think it’s a phishing email or spam:

If the message is plausible:

  • go to the website of the service, or bank yourself (don’t click that link in the email), then log in and see if you have any messages
  • if it’s someone sharing a file or similar with you, contact the person (in a new email not by using ‘reply’) and ask them.

If you’re not be sure, treat it with caution and report it

It it amazing what hackers can do with access to your device, they get access to EVERYTHING you do on that device which can take a massive toll on you individually and damage your relationships.

  • You could lose access to your banking and social media accounts.
  • You could find all your data has been deleted or encrypted and held for ransom.
  • Your identity could be stolen,
    • loans and credit cards may be opened in your name.
    • unauthorised purchases may be billed to you.
  • You may become a victim of tax fraud.
  • You may be locked out of apps and web-based services, forever!! (Losing family photos, thesis papers etc).
  • Your electronic devices may be used as a tool of cyber-crime (sending spam or spreading malware).

See more about cyber security at UC>

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