All posts by fmc64

Life at UC – getting ready to live in a hall of residence

Getting ready for life in a hall of residence? It’s natural to feel nervous, apprehensive and excited all at the same time when you first arrive at your hall of residence (hall).  You’ll find it easier to settle in when you realise you are not alone and meet others with similar interests to yourself.  Make an effort to start up a conversation with someone – it could lead to a lifelong friendship. 

Here are some suggestions which will help you prepare for your arrival, and for settling into your new home.

Before you arrive

  • Plan to arrive on your contract start date. Let your hall know when you are arriving, particularly if you are arriving before or after your contract start date.
  • Check the information provided by your hall on what you need to bring with you and let them know if you are bringing any large items such as a bike or surfboard. Car parking should also be booked before you arrive, if required. Car parking in halls is limited, so get in early.
  • Your Residential Assistant or Tutor may/will contact you prior to arrival. Jot down any questions you want to ask before you arrive.
  • Join your hall Facebook group. You can learn a lot about other students who will be in your hall before you even arrive.

When you arrive

  • Your hall will have activities and events planned for when you first arrive. Look out for communication from your hall and plan to attend as many as you can – get involved.
  • Join the UCSA Facebook Group to find out what is happening during Orientation Week.
  • Make sure you know your 8-digit student ID number. This will come in handy when you arrive in your hall and at UC.

You are enough

Over the last three years, UC student Eleanor Hurton has had a role at Bounce – a Red Cross youth-led peer education project run by young people for young people. The Bounce website is a place for young people to find tips and inspiration to live life well.

Here, Eleanor provides some advice about the feelings that can come with grades or projects that can feel like we haven’t done a good job.

“This semester is the final semester of my degree, and I have done as much as I can to ensure I come away with the best degree possible. I want to graduate feeling like I have learned as much as I can and am able to put the skills I have learned to good use, to help make this world a better place.

I believe it is so important for us to have pride in our accomplishments. As young people we are all involved in various pursuits: study, work and volunteering to name a few. We often put a lot of time and a lot of heart and soul into the activities we do, and strive to be the best we can be.

But I think sometimes it is easy for us to feel like we haven’t done a good job – that our grades are not high enough or our projects are not successful. I know that I can be my own worst critic at times, and I know this is something a lot of young people struggle with.

So, I want you to think back to something you have done recently that you have put a lot of yourself in, and really allow yourself to feel proud of what you have achieved or what you are working towards.

Your efforts are enough, even if it does not feel that way at times. You are doing amazingly, and you deserve to feel pride in that.

After all, Sierra Boggess once said, “You are enough. You are so enough. It is unbelievable how enough you are.”

Read her original blog in full here>

Not feeling good about your grades? Here’s what you could do next.

Here are some other great blogs that might help you consider what’s next:

Asking for help is the number one life skill>

What is healthy thinking?>

Coping with failure>

 

That Terrible Time: Eye-witness accounts of the 1918 influenza pandemic in New Zealand released

Dr Geoffrey Rice’s latest book That Terrible Time: Eye-witness accounts of the 1918 influenza pandemic in New Zealand, is due for release on Friday 23 November.

New Zealand’s worst public health disaster occurred in November 1918 when around 9,000 people died in the so-called ‘Spanish’ influenza pandemic.

In this new book are the voices of 110 survivors describing what they saw and what happened to them in that terrible time
when the victims’ bodies turned black.

That Terrible Time has many moving and memorable human stories describing how New Zealand coped with the 1918 flu. Amidst the horrors of victims’ bodies turning black from cyanosis, there are some amusing episodes when people could not help seeing the funny side of a grim and terrifying time.

Dr Rice’s books published previous to That Terrible Time included brief excerpts from the many interviews and letters he had gathered in the course of his research, but this collection includes many that have never before been published, and longer extracts from those that have.

Emeritus Professor of History Dr Geoffrey Rice (Alumnus 1965) has had a busy year helping to mark the centenary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Following the publication of his book Black Flu 1918: the story of New Zealand’s worst public health disaster (Canterbury University Press, 2017) he was invited to deliver keynote addresses at international influenza conferences in Madrid, Singapore and Melbourne. The NZ Ministry of Health invited him to address meetings of senior managers responsible for implementing New Zealand’s Influenza Pandemic Plan and he also spoke at a national civil defence conference in Wellington. In addition he has delivered over 30 talks about the 1918 flu to various U3A, Probus and genealogy groups in Christchurch, Wellington, Nelson and Timaru.

The introduction in That Terrible Time explains how he first became interested in the subject, and the research that led to the publication of Black November in 1988, and its expanded and updated second edition in 2005. This book remains the world’s only country-level study of the 1918 flu based on individual death records. Professor Rice’s mortality data has been used by researchers at the Wellington clinical school of the Otago Medical School for a series of articles in the New Zealand Medical Journal. His own article on influenza in New Zealand before 1918 was recently published in the prestigious American Journal of Epidemiology.

That Terrible Time: Eye-witness accounts of the 1918 influenza pandemic in New Zealand is available from the distributors, NATIONWIDEBOOKS.CO.NZ, at $24.99.