All posts by TSR17

UC joins Shielded Site Project to help victims of domestic abuse

UC has added the Shielded Site icon to the bottom footer section of our website where it will be visible on every UC webpage.

The project, led by the Women’s Refuge, provides a way for victims of domestic violence to ask for help. The Shielded Site provides resources, such as what to do if you are in danger, how to make a plan to get out, how to be safe online, and where to go for more support and information.  

What makes this window special is that it does not appear in the browsing history of the web browser you’re using, meaning that it can be accessed without fear that an abusive partner might discover what has been looked at.

Many victims of domestic violence live in fear of their every move being monitored, online as well in person. The Shielded Site provides a safe haven for accessing help.

Many NZ organisations have joined the project including ASB, The Warehouse, Stats NZ, Trade Me, Countdown and NZ Post.

You can learn more about the Shielded Site Project here.

 

Unexpected exam results? Check out this practical guide

The possibility of failing is an inescapable part of life. Truth is, failing happens, and it happens even to very successful people. Often, what makes the biggest difference is the attitude we take towards failure, and the practical steps we take when it happens. We’ve put together three pieces of advice to help you move forward.

Step one: Deal with the feels

  • be kind to yourself
  • give yourself some time out
  • focus on self-comfort
  • get some exercise or hang out with friends

Step two: Evaluate the situation

  • do some detective work to find out what went wrong
  • determine what you had control over
  • talk to a classmate
  • talk to course staff

Step three: Make a plan of action

  • think about positive next steps to help improve
  • eg, ask questions in classes and tutorials
  • talk with support staff for their advice
  • reframe how you think about failing

Read more about practical steps you can take here. 

Even famous people experience setbacks, check out what Barack Obama encountered early on in his political career.

“I first ran for Congress in 1999, and I got beat. I just got whooped. I had been in the state legislature for a long time, I was in the minority party, I wasn’t getting a lot done, and I was away from my family and putting a lot of strain on Michelle. Then for me to run and lose that bad, I was thinking maybe this isn’t what I was cut out to do. I was forty years old, and I’d invested a lot of time and effort into something that didn’t seem to be working…

For him, the solution was to refocus his thoughts away from questions of whether his decision to enter politics was right, and concentrate instead on the work that lay ahead.

…the thing that got me through that moment, and any other time that I’ve felt stuck, is to remind myself that it’s about the work. Because if you’re worrying about yourself—if you’re thinking: ‘Am I succeeding? Am I in the right position? Am I being appreciated?’ – then you’re going to end up feeling frustrated and stuck. But if you can keep it about the work, you’ll always have a path. There’s always something to be done.” —Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States

Success, failure and Demosthenes

Let’s be honest: exam time can be pretty stressful, not least because it raises the spectre of potentially not getting the results we wanted. While natural talents and abilities can certainly help make things easier, the importance of hard work on the path to success really can’t be overstated.

Sir Edmund Hillary demonstrated this point very well. As he put it, “In some ways I believe I epitomise the average New Zealander: I have modest abilities, I combine these with a good deal of determination, and I rather like to succeed.”

For Hillary, success in reaching the top of Mt Everest was literally a matter of taking it in steps. Metaphorically, though, the same was true for the Greek orator and politician Demosthenes insofar as he undertook a regime of action intended to help himself improve and progress.

According to reports, Demosthenes attempted to overcome the effects of a speech impediment by rehearsing speeches with pebbles in his mouth. He built an underground room so he could avoid disturbing others in his home, and practiced orations against the sound of crashing waves in order to strengthen his voice. He is even said to have fixed a sword to the ceiling and stood underneath it so that he could train himself out of a tendency to lift one of his shoulders while speaking.

Perhaps no less important than hard work on the road to success, though, is the way in which we perceive failing—and there are definitely better and worse ways of perceiving them!

If you would like to learn more about success and failure and helpful ways to think about them, we’ve collected a set resources and videos together. You can check them out here.

Tōku toa he toa rangatira.

My courage is the courage of chiefs.