Category Archives: Community notice

UC’s Professor Pickles presents on Women’s Suffrage – A Cultural Journey

UC’s Professor Katie Pickles will be speaking as part of the Suffrage Series at the Arts Centre on Tuesday 16 October, 7.00-9.00pm.

She will be joined by Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla (University of Otago) and the evening, ‘Women’s Suffrage – A cultural journey’ will give Katie and Angela a chance to explore the suffrage journey from Pākehā and Ngāi Tahu perspectives.

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga are partnering in presenting the event.

Katie Pickles is Professor of History at UC and current Te Aparangi Royal Society of New Zealand James Cook Research Fellow. After postgraduate studies at UBC and McGill, Katie has worked teaching New Zealand women’s/feminist history at UC for 23 years. She has supervised over 30 postgraduate theses and served as the UC Associate Dean of Postgraduate Studies. Katie is the author of three books and the editor of six collections. She has published over 50 essays, journal articles and opinion editorials on a variety of topics that tend to coalesce around gender, empire, heroines, hegemony, landscape and commemoration. She is currently at work on a broad sweep of women’s status in society over the past 200 years through an examination of global heroines in history.  

Angela Wanhalla is an associate professor and Te Apārangi Royal Society of New Zealand Rutherford Discovery Fellow in the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago. Her research focuses on the complex histories and politics of cross-cultural intimacy in colonial societies, particularly for Indigenous communities in New Zealand and the Pacific. Her most recent publications include the award-winning Matters of the Heart: A History of Interracial Marriage in New Zealand (2013), Mothers’ Darlings of the South Pacific: The children of US servicemen and Indigenous women, World War II (2016) co-edited with Judith A. Bennett; and He Reo Wāhine: Māori Women’s Voices from the Nineteenth Century (2017) with Lachy Paterson. She is also a judge for the 2019 Ockham New Zealand Book Awards General Non-Fiction Prize.

Book your free ticket to the event on Eventbrite

Mental Health Awareness Week – get involved

Student and staff well-being is a priority for our UC community and Mental Health Awareness Week from 8 – 14 October encourages us to focus on looking after ourselves.

World Mental Health Day is Wednesday 10 October, and we encourage you to head outdoors and get active. Walking is a great way to improve your mental health and you don’t have to be a fitness fanatic to reap the benefits. The Breeze Walking Festival has a number of walks to choose from including our own UC run, All Right? Amble 2018 

Take the time to visit our Wellbeing Partnership web page. Three UC courses to consider if you have not had the chance are: Growing Personal Resilience 2018, Mental Health & Wellbeing – Awareness for Heads & Managers and Supporting Students in Crisis.

If you are concerned about a friend, colleague or student, ask how they are doing and listen – you don’t need to be an expert. If you are still concerned, suggest they contact a professional service such as their family doctor or the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP). EAP is a confidential counselling service, paid for by the university, designed for short-term intervention.

The Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand has excellent advice at www.mentalhealth.org.nz.

Students can attend the UC Health Centre or contact Student Care at any time. If you refer a student, check in with them soon afterwards to see how they got on. These sorts of actions show you care, encourages others to get help when needed and helps remove the stigma around mental health.

 

Paul O’Flaherty 
Executive Director Human Resources
Kaihautū Matua Pūmanawa Tangata 

Lynn McClelland
Executive Director Student Services and Communications 
Kaihautū Matua Ākonga me te Whakapā

                                                                            

SVA’s 10 Essential Lessons for Sustaining a Youth Movement

The Student Volunteer Army (SVA) this week released the 10 Essential Lessons for starting, growing and sustaining a Youth Movement, as understood by the SVA and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student leaders.

In July 2018, 28 student leaders from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School traveled to New Zealand to engage with 30 members of the 2018 Student Volunteer Army Executive.  The two groups participated in a week long exchange of ideas on youth-led change, sustainable movements, leadership and activism.

To find out more go here>

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