Category Archives: Staff stories

Staff of the Year awards

The annual Staff of the Year awards were held recently  at the UCSA Event Centre. Congratulations to all of this year’s nominees and winners.

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The winners are:

Lecturer of the Year: College of Arts – Dr Masayoshi Ogino

Lecturer of the Year: Business & Law – Dr Steve Agnew

Lecturer of the Year: College of Education – Dr Valerie Sotardi

Lecturer of the Year: College of Engineering – Associate Professor Alan Wood

Lecturer of the Year: College of Science – Dr Pieter Pelser

Superstar of the Year – Simon Dorset

Great Character – Dr Steve Agnew

Technical Staff of the Year – Julian Murphy

Administrator of the Year – Heather Couch

Supervisor of the Year – Professor Ian Shaw

 

Student Make your own awards:

Lecturer with the Best Hand Gestures Award – Professor Angus McIntosh

Summoner of the Most Stimulating Sojourners Award: Dr Ann Brower

One Hit Wonder Award – Liz Waugh

Lecturer Most Able To Sympathise With Utterly Lost Students While Somehow Continuing To Baffle And Confuse Them With Basic Algebra Award – Dr Philip Gunby

Que Veneno (The Shady Award) – Sergio Redondo

Best Technology Tantrum Award – Dr Steve Agnew

And the main Lecturer of the Year Award 2018 winner is Dr Steve Agnew!

UC’s Professor Pickles presents on Women’s Suffrage – A Cultural Journey

UC’s Professor Katie Pickles will be speaking as part of the Suffrage Series at the Arts Centre on Tuesday 16 October, 7.00-9.00pm.

She will be joined by Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla (University of Otago) and the evening, ‘Women’s Suffrage – A cultural journey’ will give Katie and Angela a chance to explore the suffrage journey from Pākehā and Ngāi Tahu perspectives.

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga are partnering in presenting the event.

Katie Pickles is Professor of History at UC and current Te Aparangi Royal Society of New Zealand James Cook Research Fellow. After postgraduate studies at UBC and McGill, Katie has worked teaching New Zealand women’s/feminist history at UC for 23 years. She has supervised over 30 postgraduate theses and served as the UC Associate Dean of Postgraduate Studies. Katie is the author of three books and the editor of six collections. She has published over 50 essays, journal articles and opinion editorials on a variety of topics that tend to coalesce around gender, empire, heroines, hegemony, landscape and commemoration. She is currently at work on a broad sweep of women’s status in society over the past 200 years through an examination of global heroines in history.  

Angela Wanhalla is an associate professor and Te Apārangi Royal Society of New Zealand Rutherford Discovery Fellow in the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago. Her research focuses on the complex histories and politics of cross-cultural intimacy in colonial societies, particularly for Indigenous communities in New Zealand and the Pacific. Her most recent publications include the award-winning Matters of the Heart: A History of Interracial Marriage in New Zealand (2013), Mothers’ Darlings of the South Pacific: The children of US servicemen and Indigenous women, World War II (2016) co-edited with Judith A. Bennett; and He Reo Wāhine: Māori Women’s Voices from the Nineteenth Century (2017) with Lachy Paterson. She is also a judge for the 2019 Ockham New Zealand Book Awards General Non-Fiction Prize.

Book your free ticket to the event on Eventbrite

UC scientists mix technology, art and roleplay to show teens the earth’s power

UC geologist scientists have developed an exciting hi-tech game to help high school students understand the power of the earth.

The game, called ‘Magma Drillers Save Plant Earth’ was developed by UC Volcanologist Associate Professor Ben Kennedy and geological 3D visualisation expert Dr Jonathan Davidson with help from artists, digital experts and educators.

Ben Kennedy creating magma in their lab

The game integrates storytelling, 3D software, video technology, holograms, comic art and geology to teach secondary school students about the inner workings of volcanoes and the role of geologists and engineers.

Dr Kennedy, who last year won

a New Zealand Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award for his inspiring and engaging teaching, says he is always looking for ways to make learning fun and more engaging for students.

“We can’t keep teaching the way we’ve always taught and expect our students to stay engaged – not when we’re competing with gaming technology and Hollywood special effects. As teachers we need to keep up and stay relevant – this game is just one of the ways we’re doing that.”

The project received $30,000 in funding from the Unlocking Curious Minds 2017 funding round, administered by the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment. UC provided in-kind support through staff time, use of equipment and facilities.

The UC scientists hope to share the game with other schools, museums and educational centres around New Zealand.