Category Archives: Updates from UC staff

Important information for students from UC staff.

To our students

As we approach the week’s end, I wanted to reach out to you again following the distressing news around the loss of a student, and the circumstances surrounding it.

Our thoughts are with the student’s whānau, friends and loved ones. Respecting the family’s wishes, we have limited our comments publicly.

A formal statement was released on Wednesday 25 September sharing our devastation and our commitment to supporting the Police in their ongoing inquiries.

In addition, we confirmed our intent to commission an independent and comprehensive investigation in order to identify how this happened, and the actions required to ensure this never happens again.

Our priority is you and your wellbeing. It’s important you look after yourselves, and one another. If you need help, please reach out to any of the support services available on campus (see below).

We are here for you, so don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. If you haven’t already, take a moment to check in with your family or whānau and let them know you’re okay.

Ngā mihi,

Professor Cheryl de la Rey
Tumu Whakarae | Vice-Chancellor

 

Support services for UC students:

Wider support
0800 LIFELINE (0800 543 354) or text HELP (4357) for free, 24/7, confidential support – 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Essay buying and cheating in the news

You may have heard recent news allegations about international students at Auckland University buying their essays from ghost writers. (Source: 1 NEWS)

Cheating and academic dishonesty are not tolerated at the University of Canterbury. Academic integrity is one of the cornerstones of being a successful student, and breaching academic integrity can lead to serious consequences, including exclusion from the university.

Behaviours that put you or others at serious risk can impact on your enrolment at UC, your career and subsequent employment opportunities.

As a UC student it is your responsibility:

  • to be self-motivated and actively contribute to personal learning
  • to complete course work to the best of your ability
  • to honestly engage in your course work
  • to understand that academic dishonesty including plagiarism and cheating has serious consequences.

Please refer to the Know the Code – Student Code of Conduct pamphlet (available at Student Success, Security and UCSA offices) or Know the Code webpage for more information.

If you need support with your academic writing, the Academic Skills Centre | Pokapū Pūkenga Ako can help. They offer services and resources that focus on academic writing and strategies to support student success.

Professor Ian Wright
University of Canterbury Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

That Terrible Time: Eye-witness accounts of the 1918 influenza pandemic in New Zealand released

Dr Geoffrey Rice’s latest book That Terrible Time: Eye-witness accounts of the 1918 influenza pandemic in New Zealand, is due for release on Friday 23 November.

New Zealand’s worst public health disaster occurred in November 1918 when around 9,000 people died in the so-called ‘Spanish’ influenza pandemic.

In this new book are the voices of 110 survivors describing what they saw and what happened to them in that terrible time
when the victims’ bodies turned black.

That Terrible Time has many moving and memorable human stories describing how New Zealand coped with the 1918 flu. Amidst the horrors of victims’ bodies turning black from cyanosis, there are some amusing episodes when people could not help seeing the funny side of a grim and terrifying time.

Dr Rice’s books published previous to That Terrible Time included brief excerpts from the many interviews and letters he had gathered in the course of his research, but this collection includes many that have never before been published, and longer extracts from those that have.

Emeritus Professor of History Dr Geoffrey Rice (Alumnus 1965) has had a busy year helping to mark the centenary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Following the publication of his book Black Flu 1918: the story of New Zealand’s worst public health disaster (Canterbury University Press, 2017) he was invited to deliver keynote addresses at international influenza conferences in Madrid, Singapore and Melbourne. The NZ Ministry of Health invited him to address meetings of senior managers responsible for implementing New Zealand’s Influenza Pandemic Plan and he also spoke at a national civil defence conference in Wellington. In addition he has delivered over 30 talks about the 1918 flu to various U3A, Probus and genealogy groups in Christchurch, Wellington, Nelson and Timaru.

The introduction in That Terrible Time explains how he first became interested in the subject, and the research that led to the publication of Black November in 1988, and its expanded and updated second edition in 2005. This book remains the world’s only country-level study of the 1918 flu based on individual death records. Professor Rice’s mortality data has been used by researchers at the Wellington clinical school of the Otago Medical School for a series of articles in the New Zealand Medical Journal. His own article on influenza in New Zealand before 1918 was recently published in the prestigious American Journal of Epidemiology.

That Terrible Time: Eye-witness accounts of the 1918 influenza pandemic in New Zealand is available from the distributors, NATIONWIDEBOOKS.CO.NZ, at $24.99.