Category Archives: Student life

Everything student life – from halls and flatting to recipes, advice, reviews, fashion and travel.

2019 UCSA election results

A massive thank you to everyone who voted in the UCSA elections recently. 38.5 percent of you turned out to cast a vote, which remains the highest voter turnout of any university in NZ or Australia. You can view the full election results on the UCSA website.

Why the elections matter

  • The elected Student Executive team make sure the UCSA is working in your interests. They’re our governing body.
  • The Executive help strengthen the student voice at UC. They’re your student reps on a range of college/faculty boards and project groups. The UCSA President  also sits on the University Council – UC’s governing body.

Congratulations to the 2020 UCSA Student Executive:

UCSA election results 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Click above to view a larger image.

How will you make the most of mid-semester break?

Mid-semester break is here!
Here are some tips on making the most of it.  

  • Mid-semester break is a great chance to spend some time on your studies. Make time to finish an assignment early, plan ahead or get your head around a tricky concept you haven’t quite mastered. Karawhuia! Give it heaps!
  • If you are feeling a little bit overwhelmed with assignments or want to get ahead before exams, check out the resources on offer at the Pokapū Pūkenga Ako | Academic Skills Centre. They cover everything from understanding essay questions to referencing and lab reports to tips for giving a talk. And don’t forget to keep an eye out for workshops and seminars coming up in Term 3.
  • Most importantly it’s all about balance – me whakatā, take some time for yourself, recharge, rest, hang out with mates and do a few things you really enjoy. And remember to celebrate everything you’ve achieved so far.

UC Rec & Sport – tips for staying active :

  1. Try something new – Group Fitness will run over the mid-semester break, so you can turn up and try Yoga, Spin, Fit45 and more!

2. Get outdoors – try to get out and about at least once a day. Take a walk to the park to read your book or listen to music, or simply to just sit and relax in some green space.

Explore the botanical gardens, or closer to UC the Mona Vale gardens, perhaps even visit the art gallery or museum

3. Exercise and eat well – try to keep your exercise routine and eat good nourishing food. Baking is a relaxing activity for many, so it might be a good time to bake up a storm – share with friends, and freeze for term time treats.

If you haven’t got an exercise routine, now is a great time to start!

What my Tongan language means to me?

Koe ‘Otua mo Tonga Ko Hoku Tofi’a.

One of the few Tongan phrases I know but the one that speaks to me the most.

Embedded in our deep love for God and Tonga is our language. Our language tells our stories from the sea-farers that came before us, and will be the same language for future generations.

Tongan language is a way for those who are born outside of Tonga to stay connected to our roots. It is our connection to our traditions, culture, and ways of life. Simple words like faka’apa’apa and talangofua hold deep meanings and at times there are no words in the English dictionary that can be used to fully translate such words.

What does Tongan language mean to me?

When I hear the hymns being sung in church, or even a simple conversation, I feel as though I am somewhat proud to be Tongan. Before I moved to Dunedin for University, I can safely say that I was rarely exposed to the Tongan language. I went to church but I did not understand, I sung the hymns but did not understand, I would hear my mother and her relatives laughing over a cup of tea but I did not understand. This never really bothered me until I moved.

For the first time in life I found myself with a group of Tongan friends, who not only spoke in Tongan but actually knew the culture and the traditions. At this point, I learnt that our language carries our culture, traditions and ways of life. Our language is the essence of who we are. When I hear another person speaking Tongan I light up, because there is someone else who I can identify with. Language bring us together, it gives us the opportunity to celebrate our identity, and for that I will be eternally grateful.

By creating safe and comfortable spaces where our Tongan students feel free to speak their language, laugh in their language and interact with each other is important. Within the Canterbury University Tongan Students Association we aim to promote this. Being able to create these kind of spaces creates a home away from home for our Tongan students from all over New Zealand as well as the world.