Category Archives: Student contributors

Blogs written by UC students.

UC All Right? Amble – Tuesday 7 May

Enhance your mental fitness, get free stuff and have some fun at the UC All Right? Amble.

The first UC All Right? Amble is being held right here on campus for staff and students as part of Universities Mental Health Day.

Come along to C block lawn between 10am and 3pm, grab a UC All Right? Amble map and visit the five stations around campus to enjoy some practical and fun activities that support mental wellbeing. 

Join TeaSoc for a relaxing cup of herbal tea, get active and  join in some retro games, or try something arty to stimulate your brain. Each activity aligns with the five ways to wellbeing (see Five ways to feel All Right below).

The UC All Right? Amble is organised by UC Wellbeing and UC Health Sciences staff and students.

Health Science student Joni is involved with organising the event and says the UC All Right Amble is about having a bit of fun and being more mindful of our mental health and wellbeing. 

“Mental wellbeing is just as important as physical wellbeing. The university environment can put a lot of mental strain on a student, and having simple strategies that you can harness and use to focus on your mental wellbeing is such a good resource – for university life and beyond.” 

UC All Right? Amble
When:
Tuesday 7 May 2019
Time: 10am – 3pm
Location: C Block Lawn


Five ways to feel All Right
International research has found there are five ways we can all improve our mental health and wellbeing, even when we’re under stress.

1. Connect | Me Whakawhanaunga
Whether we’re catching up with friends, spending quality time with our whānau or getting to know someone new, connecting with others can be a great pick-me-up.

2. Take Notice | Me Aro Tonu
When we slow down and tune in to the world we can really savour the moment. Remember the simple things that give you joy.

3. Keep Learning | Me Ako Tonu
If you’re keen to try something new or rediscover an old hobby, go for it! Enjoying a fresh challenge can be a great confidence boost.

4. Be Active | Me Kori Tonu
Did you know that moving your body can also move your mood? So do what you can and enjoy what you do. Every little bit counts!

5. Give | Tukua
When did you last show a little love? Whether it’s a friendly smile, an act of kindness or giving someone a helping hand, the little things we do can make a big difference.

*Note – UC photographers and videographers will be out and about on the day taking photos of your experience.

These images or short videos may be used by the University of Canterbury in future online or for print publications, and may be placed on official UC social media profiles – if you’d prefer not to be captured let the person behind the camera know (they are friendly and won’t be offended).

Acts in the light of recent events

On behalf of the Emerging Leaders Development Programme (ELDP), I would like to provide some thoughts in the light of Friday’s events.

This event was designed to cause fear and a sense of hopelessness. Instead, we have seen acts by individuals, groups, communities and organisations, using what they have, to provide comfort, support and help to our Muslim Community.

It’s times like these that I am proud to be surrounded by such willingness to rise to compassion, kindness and to generosity, Not only in Ōtautahi Christchurch, but across Aotearoa New Zealand, around the word and, within our UC community.

Where many of us could have sat back overwhelmed by it all, we have instead seen the greatness of humanity within our community.

We have seen the Student Volunteer Army’s ethos and activation come to the forefront. Volunteers standing on the corners of our streets which made us feel safe and welcomed, and transportation provided for those who do not feel comfortable going alone.

We saw our UC community band together to support each other whilst coming to terms with the events of Friday 15March.

We saw our Muslim Students’ Association supporting the whole community, providing words of comfort, words of peace, words which also held immense grief. We saw our UCSA President address each individual student and staff with words that brought comfort, but also challenged.

“Kia kaha, kia maia, kia manawanui 
Be strong, be steadfast, be willing.”

Here at UC we have seen students reflecting on what they can give.

ELDP students Max and Louie and their fellow Rochester & Rutherford residents Harry and Oliver were inspired by this this willingness to rise above hatred and portray love.

The four created a fundraising t-shirt that went on sale last week. All proceeds from the purchase of the ‘‘We are one’ t-shirts go directly to St John Emergency Services.  

This is just one of the many initiatives we have seen over recent days.

The love, compassion and courage shown by our Prime Minister and how she has stood with those who have been affected, has challenged us to express support, empathy and strength. Ultimately showing us what the role of a true leader is.

Such leadership in the wake of the events of 15 March have spurred a lot of conversation around bystander intervention and how important it is for people to speak up when they see or hear something wrong. These conversations are necessary to shift prejudice attitudes, beliefs and to ensure the inclusiveness of everyone on our campus and city.

Last week an ELDP student was telling me how she had been finding her first year at UC. She spoke of the aroha, inclusiveness and warmth that she felt here.

Reflective of Friday’s events and the importance of ‘calling out’ when someone offends, she told me how she this week confronted The Edge radio station for an inappropriate comments made by one of the presenters, about the community she is a part of, the ‘Little People of New Zealand.’

She was then enabled to go on air, educate them on the proper terminology, and to make a stance. 

“Offensive comments have never been okay, and will never be okay,” she explained.

This is an example to all of us, of the capability we have to speak up when we hear something that is not right. Therefore, my challenge to you is to be the person that speaks out.

Be the person that advocates for inclusiveness, kindness, and compassion in a world that sometimes feels the opposite.

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” Martin Luther King

I think the message I take away from this quote is, that your words and actions can either destroy or bring life, so choose life. Your words can either bring darkness or provide light, so choose light. Your words can either bring hate or show love, so chose love.

Beth Walters
Emerging Leaders Development Programme

Join us for Parly to the People *location change*

This Friday, Speaker Trevor Mallard and MPs are bringing Parliament to UC. Students are encouraged to come along for a BBQ and a chat.

The travelling non-partisan event was launched in South Auckland at the end of last year, and aims to encourage student engagement. They’re out to prove that you don’t need to live in Wellington to get involved with Parliament – there are loads of ways to have your say.

Friday’s event will be hosted by the UC Pols club, a non-partisan political group here on campus. They’ll be joined by Mr Speaker and MPs David Carter, David Seymour, Matt Doocey and Jan Logie.
If you’re keen for a chat and a bite to eat, stop by Parly to the People in the Undercroft this Friday from 1.00pm to 2.30pm.

See you there!

  • When: Friday 15 March, 1.00pm–2.30pm
  • Where: the Undercroft.