Are you interested in volunteering?

UC is once again partnering with Volunteering New Zealand and Volunteering Canterbury for our annual Volunteering Expo.

If you’re interested in volunteering, then this event is a great place to learn more about how you can help some very worthy organisations.

We have 31 not-for-profit and charitable organisations registered to attend and yes we will be having some furry, four legged friends coming along as well thanks to the SPCA and UC Careers.

Staff and students are very welcome to attend and all exhibitors are keen to engage new volunteers. 

Expo attendees include AIESEC, CCC – Graffiti Off the Wall programme, CCR – UC Co-curricular Record, Christchurch City Mission, Christchurch Riding for Disabled, CoCA – The Centre of Contemporary Art, Delta Community Support Trust, Dementia Canterbury, Dress for Success Christchurch, English Language Partners Christchurch, Garden to Table Trust, Girl Guiding New Zealand, Hagley Adult Literacy Centre, Hearing Support Christchurch, Heart Kids Canterbury, Imagination Station Christchurch, NZ Defence Reserves, Petersgate Counselling Centre, Pillars, Plunket New Zealand, Presbyterian Support, Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust, SASSC – Sexual Assault Support Service Canterbury Aviva, SkillWise, SPCA Canterbury, St Albans Community Centre, St Vincent de Paul Christchurch, Student Volunteer Army, Train the Brain, Volunteering Canterbury, and Youthline.

ANZAC Service

On behalf of University of Canterbury Students’ Association, I would like to invite you to our ANZAC Service on Wednesday the 25th of April at 10.00am.

The sense of unity that is widely felt on ANZAC Day is important to acknowledge, and together we can commemorate a day of such special significance to New Zealand, within our community.

All are welcome to attend; for us, this is an important occasion for students, staff and the wider community to come together.

The Service will take place on the Quad between Matariki and Puaka-James Hight Building followed by light refreshments at the Okeover Lawn.

Kind Regards
Josh Proctor
UCSA President

New book published by Heather Wolffram

Senior Lecturer in Modern European History Heather Wolffram has just had a book published – we asked her some questions ahead of the launch next month.

Q: What is the book about?
Forensic Psychology in Germany, 1880-1939: Witnessing Crime examines the emergence and early development of forensic psychology in Germany from the late nineteenth century until the outbreak of the Second World War, highlighting the field’s interdisciplinary beginnings and contested evolution.

Initially envisaged as a psychology of all those involved in criminal proceedings, this new discipline promised to move away from an exclusive focus on the criminal to provide a holistic view of how human fallibility impacted upon criminal justice. As this book argues, however, by the inter-war period, forensic psychology had largely become a psychology of the witness.

Q: Why is this important?
A: My book looks at how and why the psychology of the witness, particularly the child witness, became important in German courtrooms in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Germany. It uses a number of sensational murder and sex crimes trials to look at how psychological expertise was applied in court and asks why forensic psychology appears to have gone into decline under the Nazis. This is the first book-length study of the history of forensic psychology in any national context and is therefore a significant contribution to the history of the field.

Q:Why is it relevant now?
A: There remains today significant concern about the reliability of witness testimony, particularly in cases where children appear as prosecution witnesses. My work shows that the kinds of debates that emerged in the 1990s around the reliability of repressed memories and juvenile witnesses, were not new and had been rehearsed in German courtrooms as early as the 1890s. My work demonstrates what some of the consequences of these earlier debates were for the treatment of juvenile witnesses and the fortunes of forensic psychologists.

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