Tag Archives: Book launch

Kamupūtu | Gumboots book launch tonight

Kamupūtu | Gumboots event concludes Te Wiki o te Reo | Māori Language Week

Old myths are given a contemporary treatment in a stunning new te reo picture book being launched tonight, 13 September, at the conclusion of Te Wiki o te Reo Māori | Māori Language Week at the University of Canterbury (UC).

The first in a series of books designed to help children and adults learn te reo, the book Māui me te ao hou was created by UC Master’s of Te Reo student Unaiki Melrose, who worked with illustrator Jo Petrie to bring a popular Māori myth to life.

Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu (South Island Whānau Ora Commissioning Agency) funded the publication, which is a celebration of mana wahine, or the authority and strength of women.

Māui me te ao hou will be launched at the event Kamupūtu | Gumboots on 13 September, 5pm to 7pm, in the Engineering Core.

New book published by Heather Wolffram

Senior Lecturer in Modern European History Heather Wolffram has just had a book published – we asked her some questions ahead of the launch next month.

Q: What is the book about?
Forensic Psychology in Germany, 1880-1939: Witnessing Crime examines the emergence and early development of forensic psychology in Germany from the late nineteenth century until the outbreak of the Second World War, highlighting the field’s interdisciplinary beginnings and contested evolution.

Initially envisaged as a psychology of all those involved in criminal proceedings, this new discipline promised to move away from an exclusive focus on the criminal to provide a holistic view of how human fallibility impacted upon criminal justice. As this book argues, however, by the inter-war period, forensic psychology had largely become a psychology of the witness.

Q: Why is this important?
A: My book looks at how and why the psychology of the witness, particularly the child witness, became important in German courtrooms in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Germany. It uses a number of sensational murder and sex crimes trials to look at how psychological expertise was applied in court and asks why forensic psychology appears to have gone into decline under the Nazis. This is the first book-length study of the history of forensic psychology in any national context and is therefore a significant contribution to the history of the field.

Q:Why is it relevant now?
A: There remains today significant concern about the reliability of witness testimony, particularly in cases where children appear as prosecution witnesses. My work shows that the kinds of debates that emerged in the 1990s around the reliability of repressed memories and juvenile witnesses, were not new and had been rehearsed in German courtrooms as early as the 1890s. My work demonstrates what some of the consequences of these earlier debates were for the treatment of juvenile witnesses and the fortunes of forensic psychologists.

‘Blood Ties’ book launch & competition

Come along to the Canterbury University (CUP) book launch of Blood Ties: New and selected poems 1963-2016, the latest collection by UC’s popular poet Jeffrey Paparoa Holman.

Poet Jeffrey Paparoa Holman
Poet Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

This gripping and powerful collection spans Jeffrey’s writing career of more than 50 years.  Exploring the journey of a life in Aotearoa New Zealand, Blood Ties touches on universal human concerns: love, loss, grief and courage in the face of difficulties, in a language that is accessible to all.

Blood Ties has been designed and printed in collaboration with Ilam Press and will be launched by acclaimed author and UC Emeritus Professor Patrick Evans.

When: 5.30-7.00pm, Thursday 9 March
Where: University Bookshop, University Drive
RSVP: for catering purposes by Thursday 2 March to universitypress@canterbury.ac.nz

Win a copy of Blood Ties (RRP $25)
To go in the draw to win a copy of Blood Ties, answer the following question:

Q: What was the title of Jeffrey’s previous collection of poetry, published by CUP in 2012? (Hint: find the answer here.)

Please email your answer to: universitypress@canterbury.ac.nz by 12 noon Tuesday 7 March. The winner will be drawn at random and announced in Intercom on 10 March.