Tag Archives: CCR

2020 ENG ME! Peer Mentoring Programme

Would you like to strengthen your leadership and teamwork attributes on your CV and get paid for it?

The College of Engineering is recruiting students to join our 2020 ENG ME! Peer Mentoring programme as mentors and tutors.

This is a paid employment with the College of Engineering, so you can earn some money while also supporting your fellow students!

Application forms are available here -> https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/engineering/engme/

Alternatively, you can pick up physical application forms at the College of Engineering office reception (John Britten – Ground floor).

Any questions? Email us at engme@canterbury.ac.nz or visit us at the College of Engineering office.

More info:

ENG ME! is our student-led, College-enabled peer mentoring programme.

  • All Engineering Intermediate students and 1st year Product Design students are assigned to a peer mentoring group led by an ENG ME! Mentor who is a current Professional Year College of Engineering student who has “been there and done that” successfully. These groups will meet weekly for the first 10 weeks of Semester 1.
  • ENG ME! Mentors provide group mentoring to Engineering Intermediate students and 1st Year Product Design students in their first year of study at UC offering direction, encouragement, motivation and friendship through weekly contact for the first 10 teaching weeks of Semester 1.
  • Mentors can choose to run any of their weekly mentoring sessions as study groups and that is where our ENG ME! Tutors step in to help.
  • Mentors are able to invite ENG ME! Tutors and Academic Staff to attend sessions and answer student (mentees) questions. No preparation is required for ENG ME! Tutors, just a knowledge of the first year College of Engineering courses and an ability to explain concepts or answer questions.

Meet Bejen Patel…

Bejen Patel, BCom

  • Strong communicator
  • Innovative thinker

Bejen is a third year commerce student who’s been making the most of uni life and getting involved in extra activities. The experience and skills he’s gained through these activities will be captured on his Co-curricular Record (CCR). Here’s his story…

Back in 2016, my first year at UC, I signed up to be a Class Rep. At the same time I was asked if I wanted to sign up for CCR. As I found out more about CCR I thought it seemed like a good way to show the additional things I’ve done and skills I’ve learned while studying. And I was signing up to be a Class Rep anyway so I thought I might as well get recognition for it.

The Class Rep role can vary depending on the class. Basically if students have any problems or issues, or feedback for the lecturer – for example they can’t follow what the lecturer is saying or there’s something the lecturer has missed out – then they can come and talk to me. I can raise their concerns with the lecturer and then go back to the students on the outcome. Usually if one student is saying something’s happening, there’ll be a whole lot of other students thinking exactly the same thing.

The role, which I also did in second and third year, has definitely helped me to build strong communication skills and adapt my communication style when needed. When I’m talking to other students in my class I try to be more approachable and friendly, whereas when I’m approaching lecturers and heads of departments with feedback I’ve got to be more professional. I’ve got to know the lecturers quite well through the process and have formed good connections with them.

Just being able to talk to different people from different backgrounds, I’ve probably become more confident as a person. I definitely didn’t used to be as open with other people, but now I can easily go up and talk to someone.

I’ve also been involved with the Entre $85k Start-Up Challenge, which has taught me a lot about innovation, thinking outside of the box and being more adaptable and flexible. A few of us had an idea from a course we did last year to develop an app for students called ‘Study With Me’. We put that forward and have recently made it into the top 10 ventures.

We’ve talked to lots of business people and mentors, and have made connections and learned to network. The mentoring sessions have been really useful for building knowledge and skills that are really hard to get otherwise. You learn about how to take an idea and start your own business, market validation and things like that. It’s something you don’t learn in the classroom – it’s sort of like getting the real world experience before you get to the real world. 

There’s so many opportunities that you can take up UC. Doing extra activities – like being a Class Rep, doing the Entre $85k Start-Up Challenge, or being involved in a club – they all teach you skills you can use long-term. The CCR recognises your involvement in these activities and everything you’ve done is summed up and recorded in one place, which is quite useful when it comes to applying for a job. 

Interested in CCR?
Find out more at www.canterbury.ac.nz/ccr  
Visit UC Careers at Level 1, Geography building (next to Café 101)

Above: Bejen has been a Class Rep and participated in the Entre $85k Start-Up Challenge while studying commerce at UC.

Get yourself a competitive edge

Need experience to get experience?  Getting a job should not look like this.

You need to get a competitive edge.

You’ve made a good start if you are already actively involved in the UC community, such as a club or society.  Why not go one step further and increase your employability by gaining key skills and experience while you study? Co-Curricular Record (CCR) is the way to go.



Workskills +  your graduate profile  = ‘got the competitive edge’

 UC has created a Graduate Profile : five attributes for UC students to develop that will set you apart from other university graduates.

The first is critical competence in a core academic discipline of your choice

A CCR activity will cover one of more of the other four attributes.  

They are:

Bicultural competence and confidence>

Community engagement>

Employability, innovation and enterprise>

Global awareness>

Work readiness skills

Alongside those attributes UC has identified nine of the most important work readiness skills that employers look for in university graduates.

These skills are:

  • Communication
  • Initiative and enterprise
  • Leadership
  • Learning
  • Planning and organising
  • Problem solving, Self-management
  • Teamwork
  • Technology 

Together, the workskills and attributes in a CCR activity prepare you for employment in New Zealand and across the globe, give you experience and help you become work ready – with a competitive edge.

Including your printed CCR with your CV shows employers that UC recognises and gives you credit for engaging with the wider UC Community whilst completing your study.

Picture it now –  an interview where you have brilliant answers to every STAR (behavioural-based) question. 

So get involved with CCR to give yourself a competitive edge. Click here for more information about CCR>