Tag Archives: College of Engineering

Sustainability Framework series: Teaching and Learning

In February 2018, UC adopted a Sustainability Framework, which establishes the approach UC will take to meet its environmental commitments and to incorporate sustainability concepts into decision making at all levels.

The Framework covers approaches to teaching, learning and research, operations, and partnerships for sustainability. In a four part blog series, the UC Sustainability Office is exploring stories of where and how the Framework is contributing to the University’s sustainability journey.

Part one: Teaching and Learning

What do all undergraduate students of ENGR101 have in common? The beginnings of an in-depth understanding of sustainability. The Sustainability Office recently met with Dr Alex Yip, Senior Lecturer in Chemical and Process Engineering, and Assistant Course Coordinator for ENGR101 to discuss how sustainability fits into their courses, and has become a key learning outcome of the paper, Foundations of Engineering.

We met Alex shortly after undergraduate students participated in their dedicated sustainability lecture presented by Professor Peter Gostomski, and attended a two hour follow-up workshop.

Here’s what we learnt:

  • Understanding sustainability as a concept, and being able to comment on and identify sustainability issues is a key learning outcome of ENGR 101.
  • Why? It’s explored in the sense of gaining global awareness and engaging with the community outside of the classroom environment.
  • ENGR101 touches on concepts, definitions, and case studies to develop critical thinking on sustainability issues.
  • Sustainability is far more than just a buzz word for engineers – as they are involved in everything from resource use and extraction through to technology and product design, it is essential engineering students are fully engaged with sustainability concepts through all levels of study.
  • The professional body Engineering NZ expects engineering graduates to be confident and capable of thinking critically about sustainability issues.

Alex speaks to the huge variety of fields and research areas on offer at UC, the majority of which hold sustainability at their core. From Chemical and Process Engineering to Global Humanitarian Engineering, and initiatives such as Engineers without Borders and the Shell Eco Marathon, the scope of teaching and learning around sustainability in engineering at UC seems endless.

Apply now: Francis Small Scholarship for Engineering

Dan Court-Patience reflects on receiving a Francis Small Scholarship to support his master’s research in engineering. Applications close for this scholarship on Thursday 30 November. Find out more and apply here>

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Good engineers are not employed because of how much they know but rather their ability to solve problems for others. Post-graduate studies for me is not a means to an end but rather a journey on how to navigate a problem that has conflicting and limited information. It has exposed me to some great individuals and teams that are motivated by real-world problems and has taught me that in order to solve these sorts of problems we have to work together and communicate effectively between ourselves and the public.

During my undergrad studies I started to grasp the fundamentals of engineering and therefore wanted the opportunity to craft these skills before going into industry. The Masters Programme puts you in charge of your own project, which is both challenging and exciting. It gives me the ability to continually learn and apply new knowledge in support of my research.

I am truly pleased and proud to receive the Francis Small Scholarship. Post-graduate studies can be a financial burden that deters many students from following their passion.

Learning about Francis, particularly his involvement in key New Zealand projects and willingness to give back, has given me something to aspire to in my engineering career.

Thesis in Three presentation: Philipp Sueltrop, Rocket fuel slosh

Philipp Sueltrop from College of Engineering won first place in the UC Thesis in Three finals with his very engaging presentation on Rocket fuel slosh. Who knew coffee and rockets had so much in common?

Stop-the-Press:  Congratulations again to Philipp who has just returned from representing UC at the Asia-Pacific 3MT (Three-Minute-Thesis) competition in Brisbane. Philipp got into the top 10 finalists from 55 Asia-Pacific Universities.

Each year, the Dean of Postgraduate Research at UC sponsors and organises the Thesis in Three competition for postgraduate students. PhD and Masters students give a three-minute presentation to describe their thesis research with only a single presentation slide. The top three students from each college round go on to compete in the UC final.