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Fair Trade Fortnight

UC has been Fair Trade accredited for over a year now, and we get to celebrate by being part of Fair Trade Fortnight this 3 -16 August.

Fair Trade Australia and New Zealand are holding their annual Fair Trade Fortnight this August to raise awareness of all the benefits Fair Trade brings. We’re joining the celebration by holding several events on campus throughout the fortnight. Check out some highlights below and follow UC Sustainability on Facebook for more details!

Intro to Fair Trade
The event kicks off Friday 3 August, with an interactive Q&A from Trade Aid, one of New Zealand’s biggest importers of Fair Trade products. It’s the perfect introduction to what fair trade is. Come along to Puaka-James Height 210 between 12.00pm – 2.00pm to learn more about all the great work being done by Trade Aid.

Ethical Fashion Talk
On Friday 10 August UC Sustainability are hosting a talk by Samantha Jones, founder of fair trade clothing company Little Yellow Bird and UC alumna. Sam is going to be discussing the importance of ethical fashion and knowing where your clothes come from. Keep an eye on UC Sustainability’s Facebook page for more info.

Fair Trade Fair
Our main event is Fair Trade Fair, happening 12.00pm – 2.00pm in the Undercroft on Friday 10 August. It gives students a chance to meet some of the suppliers which helped UC earn their Fair Trade accreditation, including Common Good, Trade Aid and more. The brands will be sharing how they celebrate Fair Trade Fortnight, with market stalls, competitions, and giveaways!

Fair Trade Film Night
The fortnight will be rounded out with a film night in Undercroft 101 on 14 August. From 5.00pm Indie doco Black Gold will be screened, a film exploring Ethiopia’s coffee industry, and the ways fair trade can benefit the 15 million coffee workers in the county. Fair trade hot chocolate and baking will be provided!

UC’s coffee change for good

Some of you may have noticed the UCSA cafes seems to have switched coffee suppliers. Out with Jailbreaker Roastery, and in with Common Good Coffee Roasters. But what you may not have realised… is it is still the same supplier, just rebranded! (which explains why it still tastes so delicious.)

Change is good. Same coffee, same people, new name, bigger story!

So why do we love Common Good Coffee so much?

  • It’s Fairtrade certified (and as a Fair Trade accredited university, we would drink no less)
  • It’s organic (no nasties)
  • It’s delicious (obviously)
  • Its roasted locally (just down the road at Addington Coffee Co-op in fact)
  • Plus, we know exactly where the beans come from (the Ethiopian Sidamo bean comes from Oromia Coffee Farmers’ Cooperative Union, with premiums from coffee exports returned directly to farmers, and also used to fund initiatives such as food security and organic farming programmes)
  • All Common Good’s profits are reinvested back into communities around the world (ok… tell us more)

Common Good Coffee Roasters is part of a bigger picture. MUCH bigger in fact. They are part of a wider business called Common Good, which acts as a vehicle to give consumers, producers and their communities the ability to make the changes in their lives that they wanted to see.

They began this journey 10 years ago, under the familiar names of Jailbreaker Coffee Roastery, Liminal Apparel, and Addington Coffee Co-op, roasting and making the delicious coffee you drink on campus, and also providing ethically made tee-shirts and bags. Over 1 million coffees, untold tons of coffee beans, and thousands of ethical tee’s and bags later, they were ready for the next step. Part of the business is now shifted and based in Kolkata, India, where the team behind your daily coffee has been creating jobs and employment for women in their communities, through their apparel and wristband business, now called Common Good Apparel.

Excited? Inspired? Still have questions? Check out Common Good, to see and learn more about how they are doing business for good. Or, follow them on Facebook and Instagram @commongoodcoffeenz.

So. It’s more than just your cup of morning coffee, but at the same time… It’s all about that cup of morning coffee. We are all part of a journey to make good a little more common. And we are proud to have them here at UC!

Catch Common Good at this year’s Fair Trade Fortnight! From the 3 – 16 August, UC Sustainability is holding talks, movie screenings, and a Fair Trade Fair on campus. Keep your eyes out on our Facebook page for more info!

UC student start-up Mallu

Meet new Christchurch start-up Mallu. This is not your average streetwear label, these guys are UC students and this is a social enterprise using only fairtrade fabrics! They showcased their tees at the UC Fairtrade Market.

We had a wee chat with them …
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Who runs Mallu and what do you do at UC? We are Clive Antony (BA/LLB) – Sales and Marketing; Megan Gerrard (BCom) – Logistics and Operations; and Jess Langtry (BFA) – Creative.

You just launched your own fairtrade label, can you tell us a bit about that? Mallu is a fairtrade streetwear clothing label. We started with long-sleeve tees made from organic and fairtrade cotton. We import the tees and print our own designs on them, which follow the street fashion vibe of New Zealand. However, our business runs deeper than just producing clothes that make you look awesome! We’ve hooked up with a factory in India that only employs woman who have been taken out of the local sex trade.

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What are your aims/ambitions with the business? We’d love to be able to provide a whole range of streetwear clothing and be a leader in filling the ethical streetwear gap in the market.

What or who inspired you guys to do this? Freeset Global is an organisation we partner with. Freeset is a fairtrade factory based in Kolkata, India, and their point of difference is that they only employ women who have been taken out of the local sex trade. They give them the choice to leave a trade they never chose in the first place. Freeset have a campaign to build a second factory, which will provide important community services to their employees. When our customers buy a Mallu t-shirt, $2 of every tee goes to the Freeset campaign fund.

That’s awesome! Why is Fairtrade important for you? Fairtrade is important to us because we all have a strong passion for sustainable business and social enterprise. Fairtrade allows us to start a business that does more than make our customers feel good about how they look, but also allows us to make a tangible difference to communities in developing countries

Any challenges in choosing to go the fairtrade route? PLENTY of challenges: suppliers  worldwide are extremely limited and due to the scarcity it makes it a lot more expensive.

In five/ten years’ time, what would you like to be doing? We would love Mallu to become a well established brand in New Zealand with a lot more products, which would allow us to be the the leading ethical alternative in the streetwear fashion scene.

Sketch Logo copyWant to know more about Mallu? Connect with Mallu through Facebook or Twitter.

This message was brought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Connect with us through Facebook or Instagram.

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