Tag Archives: Scholarship

Precision Drive Health – summer research scholarship applications open

A competitive opportunity for ten summer scholarships nationwide funded by Precision Drive Health (PDH) are available.

Student eligibility is:

  • The student must have completed at least three years of study, and still be enrolled at an academic institution;
  • The student and the academic supervisor/co-supervisor must be from the same institution.
  • The student must have a GPA of at least a 6.0 in their four best papers of the most recently-completed year.
  • There must be an identified academic as the research supervisor for the 10 week summer project.  

The summer research application form is available on the PDH website. Project applications close on 15 September 2018.

Applications from any PDH-related research area are welcomed, but there is high interest in receiving applications in the following specific areas:

  • Economic analysis of health data to measure the effectiveness for data-driven decision making in precision health
  • Modelling healthcare pathways to enable interoperability, and the collection of data around the process of care 
  • Activating patients and increasing their engagement in health data management 
  • Reducing inequity in healthcare quality (distinct from healthcare outcomes) using data-driven approaches 
  • Data-driven visualisation to improve healthcare quality
  • Application of genomic data to clinical practice
  • Data-driven approaches to understand and predict the impact of social interventions on health

Go to the website and apply today>

Apply now to spend your summer in Beijing

 

Do you have plans for your summer break? How about spending five weeks at Peking University in Beijing, China while working on a project for an Aotearoa New Zealand organisation and earning credit at the same time? Applications close on Tuesday 31 July so get in quick! The programme is open to undergraduate students from ANY degree.

This five-week programme organised in collaboration with Peking University provides an opportunity for 14 students to explore Beijing while working on a project for an Aotearoa New Zealand organisation.

You will be living near Peking University in the centre of Beijing. This combined with your project as well as language, history and culture classes and exciting day trips in and around Beijing will enable you to gain a unique insight into another culture.

The programme is funded by the Prime Minister’s Scholarship for Asia (PMSA). This means that we can offer the programme at a heavily subsidised fee of $1500(NZD). This includes flights, accommodation, meals, activities and day trips in and around Beijing, airport transfers, travel insurance and your Chinese visa.

The programme will run from Friday 16 November to Sunday 23 December, 2018.

For more information please visit the website or email partnerships@canterbury.ac.nz

Restoring Māori literacy narratives

Recipient of the prestigious Brownlie Scholarship Melissa Derby (Ngāti Ranginui) hopes that her research makes a difference in the lives of the children participating in her study. She also hopes they will find enjoyment in reading just like she did as a child.

Melissa Derby

A student at the College of Education, Health and Human Development | Te RāngaAko me te Hauora, Melissa’s whānau inspired in her a lifelong passion for reading which, in turn, means this project holds a special place in her heart.

Working with bilingual children – specifically te reo Māori and English – Melissa has co-constructed a literacy programme designed to support phonological awareness (the ability to hear and decode sounds in words) and vocabulary knowledge. Both skills are widely recognised as being key predictors of children’s later success in reading and writing.

With one in three children unable to meet National Standards for Year One reading and one in four unable to meet National Standards for Year One writing, Melissa hopes to give early recognition for those who may fall behind in order to give them the best possible start.

“Once children fall behind, it can be difficult to recover their skills, and this may have implications for their experiences and outcomes during their formal schooling and beyond,” she says.

“We know what skills children need to be strong in before they learn to read so I am very happy to be employing a strengths-based approach in my study, where I am working with pre-school children to develop their skills so that they start primary school with the best possible chance of success in reading and writing.”

“It is my hope that my research makes a difference in the lives of the children who are participating in my study, and that they will find enjoyment in reading just like I did as a child.”

“My thesis is also unfolding as a platform to promote global human rights and self-determination particularly of Indigenous groups. I argue that literacy is a human right that is key to accessing other human rights associated with health and wellbeing, community engagement, cultural imperatives, and lifelong learning.”

Melissa has given her thesis, which is part of the A Better Start National Science Challenge, the working title of Ko te kai a te rangatira he kōrero: Restoring Māori literacy narratives to create contemporary stories of success.

Her supervisors are Gail Gillon and Angus Macfarlane, who she calls “the biggest draw card to UC” having long-admired his work in Māori communities and schools.

Prior to her work at UC, Melissa obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Education and Māori Resource Management from Victoria University of Wellington, a Master of Arts in Māori Development (First Class Honours, Dean’s List for Exceptional Theses) from AUT University and she holds a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies from Columbia University, New York.