Tag Archives: staff success

New CUP book offers insight into New Zealand’s greatest 20th-century philosopher

Canterbury University Press (CUP) is pleased to announce the publication of a new book by Associate Professor Mike Grimshaw, Arthur Prior – ‘A Young Progressive’: Letters to Ursula Bethell and to Hugh Teague 1936–1941.

Arthur Prior studied theology at Otago, but he lectured in philosophy at Canterbury University College. He invented ‘tense logic’ while he was at Canterbury during the years 1949–54 and is regarded as New Zealand’s greatest 20th-century philosopher.

Author Mike Grimshaw has previously published on unknown Prior notebooks and on Prior’s work on James Joyce. For this volume he took on the considerable challenge of transcribing, annotating and editing Prior’s letters to Ursula Bethell (who called him one of her ‘young progressives’) and to his cousin, Hugh Teague. Along with Mike, CUP would like to acknowledge and thank the staff at Macmillan Brown Library archives, where the letters to Ursula Bethell are held, for all their support and assistance.

Providing context to the annotated letters in this volume, Mike covers Prior’s journey from theology to philosophy, and his marriage with ‘the versatile Clare Hunter’ (an epithet earned through her debating society skills) with whom he travelled to Europe in 1937. Jack Copeland, Distinguished Professor and Head of Philosophy, provides the Introduction in which he concludes:

‘Arthur’s bohemian interlude in Europe and its aftermath in New Zealand … was a critical period in his development, the crucible in which the mature thinker was formed. His letters in this volume … chronicle a substantial part of that fascinating period’.

Copies are available from UBS on campus or from CUP’s online catalogue.

Associate Professor Ekant Veer receives a Sustained Excellence award

He has done it again! UC academic, teaching and wellbeing champion Associate Professor Ekant Veer won New Zealand tertiary teaching excellence honours in a ceremony at Parliament this week.

Associate Professor Ekant Veer of the Department of Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship  received a Sustained Excellence award from Ako Aotearoa National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence.

Presented by Hon Chris Hipkins, the Minister of Tertiary Education, 10 Sustained Excellence awards were presented, including two under the Kaupapa Māori category.  All Sustained Excellence winners receive $20,000 and a certificate.

 

 

This follows his being awarded the UC Teaching medal last year>
earlier this year he was named among the world’s top 40 business professors under 40>

More about the Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards>

New book published by Heather Wolffram

Senior Lecturer in Modern European History Heather Wolffram has just had a book published – we asked her some questions ahead of the launch next month.

Q: What is the book about?
Forensic Psychology in Germany, 1880-1939: Witnessing Crime examines the emergence and early development of forensic psychology in Germany from the late nineteenth century until the outbreak of the Second World War, highlighting the field’s interdisciplinary beginnings and contested evolution.

Initially envisaged as a psychology of all those involved in criminal proceedings, this new discipline promised to move away from an exclusive focus on the criminal to provide a holistic view of how human fallibility impacted upon criminal justice. As this book argues, however, by the inter-war period, forensic psychology had largely become a psychology of the witness.

Q: Why is this important?
A: My book looks at how and why the psychology of the witness, particularly the child witness, became important in German courtrooms in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Germany. It uses a number of sensational murder and sex crimes trials to look at how psychological expertise was applied in court and asks why forensic psychology appears to have gone into decline under the Nazis. This is the first book-length study of the history of forensic psychology in any national context and is therefore a significant contribution to the history of the field.

Q:Why is it relevant now?
A: There remains today significant concern about the reliability of witness testimony, particularly in cases where children appear as prosecution witnesses. My work shows that the kinds of debates that emerged in the 1990s around the reliability of repressed memories and juvenile witnesses, were not new and had been rehearsed in German courtrooms as early as the 1890s. My work demonstrates what some of the consequences of these earlier debates were for the treatment of juvenile witnesses and the fortunes of forensic psychologists.

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