Tag Archives: technology

Environmental Challenge Opportunity for International Students

C-Prize is a competition run by Callaghan Innovation that seeks to push the boundaries of what’s possible through technology. This year they’re looking for teams with world-leading innovative solutions to environmental problems, and we would like to encourage our international students to be involved.

There is an information evening tonight in which you’ll hear from leading Aotearoa New Zealand environmental innovators and learn more about the challenge. You’ll also have the chance to network with other forward-thinking founders and entrepreneurs, scientists and engineers from New Zealand’s innovation ecosystem.

When: 22 October – 5.30pm – 7.30pm
Where: Te Ōhaka – Centre for Growth & Innovation
Register here>

 

The 2019 challenge is looking for innovative tech-based solutions that can positively impact:  

  • Climate change – Slowing or reversing negative human impacts on climate
  • Fresh clean water – Cleaning up our waterways
  • Resource use – Smarter ways to use and preserve our planet’s finite resources

There are three entry categories for this year’s C-Prize:  

  • Growing and Producing:  How we grow and/or manufacture new or existing products and services in innovative ways (new materials, new processes, new systems, etc.) that will accelerate positive environmental outcomes
  • Using and Consuming:  How we consume products in ways that preserve resources (reuse, recycle, reclaim, etc.) and reduce negative environmental impacts
  • Rejuvenating Natural Systems: The creation or innovative use of technologies that will not just reduce negative environmental impacts, but improve our natural environment (land, climate, soil, water, and nutrient systems)

For further information, visit the Callaghan Innovation website>

Showcase your technology with FLINT

FLINT Christchurch (Future Leaders in Technology) are now in their second year of creation – FLINT aims to share knowledge and appreciate emerging tech, watching its contribution to positive social and environmental change.


On Thursday 21 November, FLINT will be holding their second ‘hands-on’ showcase, with technologies designed and built right on our doorstep here in Ōtautahi Christchurch!


This will be an interactive, expo style event, giving you the opportunity to talk to other young professionals about technology.

FLINT would like to extend an invitation to any and all UC students interested in taking part, providing you with an opportunity to showcase technologies you’ve been working on.


If you would like to know more or to sign up, contact kaity.mitchell@enable.net.nz

 

For more about FLINT, click here>

UC scientists mix technology, art and roleplay to show teens the earth’s power

UC geologist scientists have developed an exciting hi-tech game to help high school students understand the power of the earth.

The game, called ‘Magma Drillers Save Plant Earth’ was developed by UC Volcanologist Associate Professor Ben Kennedy and geological 3D visualisation expert Dr Jonathan Davidson with help from artists, digital experts and educators.

Ben Kennedy creating magma in their lab

The game integrates storytelling, 3D software, video technology, holograms, comic art and geology to teach secondary school students about the inner workings of volcanoes and the role of geologists and engineers.

Dr Kennedy, who last year won

a New Zealand Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award for his inspiring and engaging teaching, says he is always looking for ways to make learning fun and more engaging for students.

“We can’t keep teaching the way we’ve always taught and expect our students to stay engaged – not when we’re competing with gaming technology and Hollywood special effects. As teachers we need to keep up and stay relevant – this game is just one of the ways we’re doing that.”

The project received $30,000 in funding from the Unlocking Curious Minds 2017 funding round, administered by the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment. UC provided in-kind support through staff time, use of equipment and facilities.

The UC scientists hope to share the game with other schools, museums and educational centres around New Zealand.