Tag Archives: UC Classics

BBC Radio star Natalie Haynes to spend time with UC Classics students

While in Christchurch as part of her performance at WORD Christchurch Shifting Points of View season, Natalie Haynes is taking time out of her schedule to spend with UC Classics students and staff.

Natalie is a writer and broadcaster; the star of the BBC Radio 4 series ‘Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics’ and author of four books on classical themes. Her new novel, ‘A Thousand Ships’ was published in May of this year and is a retelling of the Trojan War.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natalie is presenting her acclaimed show ‘Troy Story’ on Sunday August 18 at 6pm in the Great Hall at the Arts Centre of Christchurch. She will be introduced by Head of Classics, Enrica Sciarrino and the Teece Museum will be open from 5pm before the event. Interested students can use this link to pick up a ticket for $15. 

During ‘Troy Story’, Natalie will take you on a tour around Trojan War, the greatest conflict in ancient literature, perhaps in literature full stop. From the causes of the war (divine displeasure) to its complex aftermath, this show encompasses some of the greatest poetry ever written. The stories of the women whose lives the war affected have been largely untold, from the Amazon warrior, Penthesilea, to the priestess who saw the whole thing coming, Cassandra. Continuing a project she began with her novel, The Children of Jocasta, Natalie takes the women out of the shadows and puts them back where they belong: in the middle of the story.

Following her performance for WORD, UC Classics is very excited to be hosting Natalie in conversation at an exclusive event for UC Classics students and staff. The discussion will include areas of Natalie’s research and writing, their own research areas and other topics of interest relevant to current UC Classics courses; a fantastic opportunity and a real treat for the department!

At home with the reality of death – reflections on Teece exhibition

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Curator, Teece Museum / Logie Collection, Terri Elder offers a personal perspective on the very popular exhibition Beyond the Grave: death in ancient times. 

It’s a somewhat strange situation to find that an exhibition all about death has turned into a celebration of life. The current exhibition at the Teece Museum  Beyond the Grave: death in ancient times, explores Greek and Roman attitudes to death and rituals around dying. It would be easy to imagine the topic being a little sad, but for me personally, I found the resulting exhibition is far from being gloomy or ghoulish.

 There are of course some very poignant details, such as the archaeological evidence of numerous infant graves, made necessary by the staggeringly high infant mortality rate in ancient Greece of 50%. The grief on the faces of the mourners depicted on the Canosan askos (JLMC 186.00) rings true in the face of such statistics.  There are also the bizarre stories of misadventure, like the ancient ‘urban legend’ which contends that the famous Greek playwright Aeschyllus met his end when a passing eagle dropped a turtle on the writer’s head! An unusual death for a soldier that had already survived the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE.

However, the strongest message I get from the ancient artefacts included in this exhibition is that the ancient Greeks and Romans were perhaps a little more at home with the reality of death as a normal part of life than many of us seem to be today. 

Death was obviously a part of their everyday experience, and the ritual artefacts they left behind show an appreciation of celebrating and remembering their loved ones actively and regularly, not just at a funeral.

The Logie Collection’s array of white-ground lekythoi, which depict scenes of Greek mourners paying ritual visits to the graves of their ancestors, capture this very well.

The artefacts in ‘Beyond the Grave’ also have in common a sense of having been created with a real commitment to communicating both beauty and purpose. The lavish grave-marking vases and sculptures of the wealthy are exquisitely crafted and decorated, but even humble grave goods, (such as the miniature terracotta horse ca.740-720 BCE, of a type often found in the graves of children, JLMC 161.75), resonate with a sense of affection and thoughtfulness.  

The exhibition runs until February 2019 at the Teece Museum, so there is plenty of time to visit and explore for yourselves whether the ancient Greek and Roman experience of death is so very different from that of our own.”

WHERE: Teece Museum, 3 Hereford St, Christchurch

WHEN: Wed-Sun, 11am-3pm, to Sunday, 24 February 2019

Entry by donation

Students return to the Arts Centre

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An official opening ceremony and dinner were held on Wednesday evening to celebrate the relocation of UC Music and Classics to the Chemistry building at the Arts Centre.

The 1910 building has been fully restored and the fit-out custom-designed for Music and Classics students. It includes a new exhibition space, the Teece Museum of Classicial Antiquities, named in recognition of UC alumnus Professor David Teece and his wife Leigh Teece who generously contributed to the restoration of the building. UC’s treasured James Logie Memorial Collection is now on permanent public display in the museum.

Hon Christopher Finlayson, who is well known for his support of the arts, was at the ceremony to declare the new home of UC Music and Classics officially open.

During the celebration dinner Christchurch Mayor, Hon Lianne Dalziel spoke about the significance of UC bringing the Logie Collection and music performances to central Christchurch for everyone to enjoy. The public can now easily access and view the Logie Collection – one of the most significant collections of Greek, Roman, Egyptian and Near Eastern artefacts in the Southern Hemisphere.

Prof Teece and Mrs Teece, who are based in the United States, also made the trip to New Zealand to join the celebration and officially open the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities.

In an interview with One News before the official opening, Leigh Teece spoke about the importance of the arts.

“Art feeds the imagination, it engages critical thinking, it fuels creative problem solving, all of which are essential to the development of innovation skills,” Mrs Teece said.

View the full news item.

The Teece Museum opening exhibition

We Could Be Heroes: The gods and heroes of the ancient Greeks and Romans opens to the public on Saturday at 11 am, and will run until 29 October 2017.

Teece Museum public opening hours:
Wednesdays through to Sundays, 11am – 3pm.

Where:
Ground floor, Chemistry building, The Arts Centre
3 Hereford Street, Christchurch

Read more about the exhibition and other events> 

UC Music Concerts and Events
An exciting programme of free music concerts and events are being held in UC’s new Recital Room in the Chemistry building at the Arts Centre of Christchurch. Read more>