Health & Safety Representative Elections 2020

Health and Safety, UC News

Health & Safety Representatives – Nominations Open

10 August 2020

Nominations are sought for the position of Health and Safety Representative for the following departments/areas:

Committee GroupDept/Service 

Vacancies

College of ArtsArts Centre1
College of Business and LawCollege Office1
College of EngineeringChemical & Process Engineering1
College of EngineeringElectrical & Computer1
College of EngineeringMathematics & Statistics1
People, Culture & CampusFacilities Services1
People, Culture & CampusProperty & Vehicle Services2
People, Culture & CampusSecurity & CCS1
People, Culture & CampusUC Logistics1
Service 1Vice-Chancellor’s Office/Registrar1
Service 1Pacific Development1
Service 1Careers, Internships & Employment1
Student LifeUC Sport & Recreation Centre1
Student LifeSSAC (Liaison)1
Student LifeAlumni and UC Foundation1

Nominations are open from: 9:00am on 10 August 2020 until 5:00pm on 21 August 2020.

  • Full list of Health and Safety Representatives
  • A description of the Health and Safety Representative role can be seen on the here.
  • If you would like to discuss the role or have any questions, please contact Angie Willington from the Health and Safety Team or your union representative.
    Completed nomination forms should be returned in a sealed envelope marked “Voting Papers” to:
    Health & Safety Coordinator, Health & Safety Office, Okeover House

The Canterbury College Survey has begun!

Are you sitting comfortably? It’s time for some UC history!

The University of Canterbury recently launched a campus-wide survey to catalogue any heritage artefacts that once lived at the original Canterbury College site. The survey is being conducted by two recent UC graduates, Natalie Looyer and Amy Boswell-Hore, under the supervision of Terri Elder, Curator of the Logie Collection and UC Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities.

Earlier this month, the team began their survey in the Department of Classics, where they found several typewriters, two tables, a lectern, and a spindled club chair. The chair was of particular interest as it may have belonged to John Macmillan Brown, one of the founding professors at Canterbury College.

While the chair itself is not remarkable, the same cannot be said for the man who may have once owned it. John Macmillan Brown arrived in Christchurch on Christmas Day, 1874, to take the Chair of Classics, History, and English Literature at a newly founded college with nowhere to call home. Fortunately, Macmillan Brown not only had a passion for scholarship but also for University policy and administration. He became a central figure in the College’s growth.

With his innovative teaching methods, students flourished and class sizes rapidly expanded under Macmillan Brown’s care. To accommodate the growth, he gifted many of his books to the university for the student’s use. His donation eventually became the Macmillan Brown Library, which takes particular interest in Māori and heritage studies like Macmillan Brown himself. Outside of his teaching role, Macmillan Brown became a member of the Royal Commission on Higher Education (1879-82), a member of the University Senate (1879), was Vice-Chancellor (1916-1923), and finally Chancellor (1923-1935). He also acted as a de facto rector in the early years of the College, particularly supporting women and students from lower-income households. By the time of his death in 1935, Canterbury College was well on its way to becoming the world-renowned University of Canterbury that we know it as today.

As the University of Canterbury moves towards our 150th anniversary, it is time that we dust off the artefacts that are hidden away, no matter how unassuming they might initially seem. You never know what story they can tell us.

Keep an eye out for more stories of Canterbury College as the survey team visits more departments around UC.

Want to know more about the survey? You can find contact details and links at http://teecemuseum.nz/collection/canterburycollege/

Image Credit:

London Stereoscopic Photographic Company. London Stereoscopic Company: Portrait of Professor John Macmillan Brown. Haast family: Collection. Ref: PA2-2914. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22590878

Data Science Projects for UC Staff

Business men in a dark room standing in front of a large data display

Data Science combines mathematics, statistics, computing, technology innovation, and practical results.

The College of Engineering is looking to engage with UC staff, to collaborate on projects they may not normally have time, or the resources, to consider. To help staff with the cleaning, processing, predictive modelling, interpretation and visualisation of their data.

Continue reading Data Science Projects for UC Staff

Fairtrade Fortnight is here!

Welcome to Fairtrade Fortnight: two weeks of celebrating and learning all about fair trade, ethical supply chains and how we as consumers can support a more just and equal trade system for producers all around the world.

There may be actions in your daily routine that you don’t think twice about, like putting on a t-shirt or sipping a morning cup of coffee. However, if you take a closer look at these threads or ask yourself where the coffee beans are coming from, you’ll find stories (both good and bad) behind these everyday products we consume.

By purchasing products that are certified through Fairtrade or the World Fair Trade Organisation, you’re standing with millions of farmers, producers and workers around the world and empowering communities by tackling poverty, gender inequality and poor working conditions.

So what happens when I purchase something labelled as Fairtrade?

To buy a Fairtrade product means you are a part of one of the largest movements for change. Fairtrade certification can help lift a farmer or worker out of poverty, give a child an education, and grow a community or a business. Fairtrade is a tool for creating this change.

How does it work?

  • The Fairtrade Minimum Price: Protects small-scale farmers against falling prices by ensuring a fixed minimum price for producers. This is particularly important for communities working in volatile industries like coffee and cocoa farming. Many sectors often force a farmer to sell below the cost of production, perpetuating a cycle of poverty and inequality.
  • The Fairtrade Premium: Is a fixed additional amount of money that provides farmers and workers with the capacity to invest in improving the quality of their businesses and communities.

Check out this video below of a coffee co-operative in Papua New Guinea, Highlands Organic Agriculture Cooperative. The money they receive from HOAC through the Fairtrade Premium is used to invest in access to clean drinking water, roofing irons, pulping machines, and most importantly: classrooms for their children.

How can I get involved?

Come and participate in UC Sustainability’s events over the next two weeks, and get behind the fair trade movement on campus with us!

Fairtrade and the SDGs Film Night

Learn about and delve into the connection between fair trade and the UN Sustainable Development Goals at our film night next week! Plus, free pizza and Fairtrade chocolate provided. See the Facebook event here.

Clothes Swap Party

Learn about the impact that the fast fashion industry has on our people and our planet at our Clothes Swap Party! Donate your good quality clothes you no longer wear and come away with some ‘new’ second hand threads, for free. BYO cup and sip on a Fairtrade coffee as you browse. See the Facebook event for all the details and how to participate here.

This message was brought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on FacebookInstagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This is part of our contribution to Fairtrade Fortnight, where we encourage our UC community to get involved and support the empowerment of producers overseas. If you’d like some more information on our Fair Trade University, see our website.

Gender Grants – to support those who are working to promote gender equity and equality

UC’s membership with the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU) provides access to these grants.  Grants open on 20 August and I anticipate more information will be available on ACU’s website then. Please promote this opportunity. Thank you.

“For more than 30 years, the ACU has worked to further gender equality and women’s empowerment – such as championing women in leadership and combating sexual violence on campus – in partnership with our members. We’re delighted to announce that 10 ACU Gender Grants, up to the maximum value of GBP 1,000 each, will soon be available to ACU members who are working to promote gender equity and equality in their institutions. Now entering its fourth year, the Gender Grants help members to meet the costs of a diverse range of projects, workshops, and events in areas such as supporting women in science and research; mainstreaming gender equity into the curriculum and developing anti-sexual harassment initiatives. The next round of applications will open on 20 August 2020.”

Karen Mather, People and Culture

Keeping UC staff informed