Workshop on Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research  

There is more and more evidence that findings from many scientific studies cannot be reproduced, casting doubt on the reliability of these studies. 

On October 26, 2018,  at the ‘Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research’ workshop,  we will discuss the extent of this replication crisis, explore various methods that can be used to check whether a study can be replicated, and present tools that can be used to make one’s own research more reproducible and trustworthy.

  • Date: Friday 26 October, 9:00am – 17:00pm
  • Place: UC Business School, Meremere, Room 236
  • Registration (important for catering purposes): email tom.coupe@canterbury.ac.nz

 Speakers and titles of the presentations

[you can find abstracts here]

  • Anton Angelo (UC Library): Transparency and reproducibility – It’s all about layers.
  • Arin Basu (UC Health Sciences): What about Why?
  • Annette N. Brown (FHI 360, Chief Science Office): Which tests not witch hunts: A diagnostic approach to conducting replication research
  • Brian Haig (UC Psychology): Understanding replication in a way that is true to science.
  • Jeff Miller (University of Otago, Psychology): The statistical fundamentals of (non)-replicability
  • Thomas Pfeiffer (Massey University, Computational Biology/Biochemistry): Betting on your peers’ results: A tale of three markets
  • Robert Reed (UC Business School): An update on the progress of replications in economics
  • Philip Schluter (UC Health Sciences): A Bayesian alternative to hypothesis testing
  • Eric Vanman (University of Queensland, Psychology). How pre-registrations can improve science: Tales from the front-line
  • Ben Wood (Integra LLC): Lessons learned from running a social science replication program

PROGRAM

Time Activity
9:00-9:30 Registration
9:30-9:35 Introduction
9:35-11:05 SESSION: Replication – Theory and Current Status
11:05-11:30 Coffee Break
11:30-12:30 SESSION: How to Detect the Truth
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-15:00 SESSION: Making Research More Reproducible
15:00-15:30 Coffee Break
15:30-16:30 SESSION: Observations from the Front Lines
16:30-17:00 Closing

More information on the replication crisis can be found on the Replication Network Website

This workshop is supported by the University of Canterbury Business School Research Committee.

FREE Cycle Skills Sessions

Want to cycle with confidence? Want to improve your cycle skills, without any cars around?

Join the UC Sustainability Office and volunteers from Go Cycle Christchurch and UC Bike to practice your cycle skills with us. We want to see as many of our staff and students on their bikes this spring, but we want you to feel safe and confident while doing so.

We’ve teamed up with Go Cycle Christchurch to bring you their popular city-wide cycle skills and confidence sessions to our UC staff and students.

What: Cycle Skills Sessions (x2)

When: Friday 5 October

  • 11:00am – 11:45am
  • 12:00pm – 12:45pm
  • Attend one session, or both

Where: Ilam Fields Tennis Courts

Meet us at the Ilam Fields with your bike, and a helmet 10 minutes before the session time. If you don’t have access to a bike, please let us know ahead of time, and we can arrange a bike and a helmet for you.

Who: Anyone who wants to spend more time gaining confidence on a bike, away from the road. We aren’t able to safely teach anyone who has never ridden before – so we ask that you’re able to safely control yourself on a bike to participate in these sessions.

What will I learn? You will be able to practice your road cycling skills, such as cycling in a straight line, looking behind, hand signals, turning corners, overtaking and a controlled zig-zag.

We are limiting numbers to 15 riders per session, on a first in, first served basis. To avoid disappointment please let us know that you’re coming by by emailing sustainability@canterbury.ac.nz, and we will put you in touch with Connie from Go Cycle Christchurch.

What next? Depending on numbers and interest, UC Sustainability may be able to continue running these sessions semi-regularly. As your confidence grows, we would like to be able to progress the skills sessions to include some slow and easy road riding – for example along the city cycle ways or through some small intersections. Please email us if you would like to see this happen.

For more information, see the Facebook event here.

We can’t wait to see you there – keep peddling!

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected, and be in touch with us! Follow us on Facebook or Instagram, or check out our website for more information about what we do, and upcoming events.

Got a question or want to know more? Email us at sustainability@canterbury.ac.nz

Email phishing test exercise

Did you know 45% of the world’s sent email is SPAM? While some SPAM email can be harmless enough, there are people out there who use email to target others, exploit their personal information and data or alter the behaviour of the device they are using.

To help us understand how well we are supporting and educating UC students and staff on cyber security we will be carrying out random phishing test exercises between now and the end of year.

The exercise will involve sending emails that use techniques similar to those used by cyber criminals to encourage the recipient to take a specific action. We will send these to a random group of UC email addresses and monitor the outcome – link clicks or attachment opens. We will only be recording the number of actions taken during the exercise and what technique was responded to. No personal information of individuals in the test group will be retained.

UC takes this kind of exploitative SPAM email seriously and employs a number of tools to reduce the amount that gets to you. The most effective way to reduce harm to you, your data and UC is to be aware of techniques being used by cyber criminals and to educate users about what to look for, how to react and who to report incidents to.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact the ITS Service Desk on 0508 UC IT HELP (0508 824 843) or on 03 369 5000.

UC Legends  – Suffrage 125 

Ada Wells was a well-known teacher, reformer, & activist in late nineteenth-early twentieth century Christchurch. More>

 

 

 

Helen Connon was Canterbury College’s first woman student and the first in the British Empire to receive an Honours degree when her Master of Arts was conferred in 1881. More>

 

Best known as one of four original “Queens of Crime” novelists, Dame Ngaio Marsh was also a renowned artist, playwright, actor and director. More>

 

 

 

 

Dame Margaret Mahy is New Zealand’s most celebrated children’s author of more than 120 titles.She graduated from Canterbury University College in 1955. More>

 

 

 

Beatrice Tinsley was one of the most creative and significant theoreticians in modern astronomy. More>

 

 

Lianne Dalziel graduated from UC with a Law degree and was admitted to the bar in 1985. She entered New Zealand Parliament in 1990 where she served for 23 years. More>

UC’s first Rainbow Hui

On Tuesday, 23rd October at 12:30pm in Undercroft 101 UC’s inaugural Rainbow Hui will be held. This will be a gathering of staff and students, rainbow and non-rainbow, from different colleges and areas. If you are involved with the rainbow community, or wish to know how to support your rainbow students, staff, and colleagues come along.

You need not bring anything but yourself. 

This is a chance for you to share and observe what has been happening across the university, interact with staff and students, and also plan for the future. 

Keeping UC staff informed