Pink Shirt Day photos

Staff and students are supporting Pink Shirt Day today and making a stand against bullying.

Check out some of the photos below.

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You can get your photos added to the slideshow, by e-mailling them to communications@canterbury.ac.nz

#pinkshirtdayNZ

Read about UC tools to support an anti-bullying culture

Watch short video  on Facebook explaining what workplace bullying is and how to recognise the four main types of workplace bullies.

See some student perspectives on diversity and bullying:

31 May is World Smokefree Day

World-smokefree-day_Facebook-story

The UC campus has been smokefree since January 2011, embracing a wider vision of integrating health into the culture, structures and processes of the University.

Frequently asked question about smokefree UC

Need a reason to quit?  Check out this list.

All nurses at the UC Health Centre are trained in smoking cessation, however you need a doctor’s appointment for prescription medication to quit smoking.

Quitline Ph 0800 778 778

First grant for emerging researcher

Up-and-coming researcher Dr Laurie McLay has received an emerging researcher first grant from the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC) valued at $160,825 over three years.

Dr Laurie McLay emerging researcherDr McLay will use the grant to continue her research on developing effective treatments for sleep problems that affect the growing number of Aotearoa New Zealand children and young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Dr McLay will be working with a team of psychologists, including Associate Professor Karyn France and Professor Neville Blampied, who are also from UC.

Sleep disruptions such as delayed sleep onset and frequent and prolonged night-time awakenings, can have an enormous impact on how children function during the day and within their families. Such sleep problems are associated with poorer physical and mental health and wellbeing (e.g., obesity, diabetes, mood disorders, and substance abuse), quality of life, cognitive functioning, learning, and academic performance.

Dr McLay says that up to 83 percent of children with ASD experience sleep disturbances, and that these are unlikely to abate over time in these children without effective treatment.
Although these sleep problems are complex in origin, she says evidence suggests there is a learned component that requires behavioural solutions.

“There are poorly understood biochemical differences in children with autism, such as irregular melatonin production and secretion, however, pharmacological strategies like melatonin and sedative medications only offer partial solutions. There is a large, treatable behavioural component to the sleep problem that becomes entwined with the parental behaviours that can unintentionally exacerbate it,” says Dr McLay.

Dr McLay is one of 13 researchers to receive emerging researcher first grants valued at a combined total of $3.03 million in the HRC’s 2017 funding round, up from $1.45 million in 2016.. Read more here.

See dates for 2018 applications>

Wear your Pink Shirt Friday 26 May

Speak up – stand together – stop bullying

Are you ready to celebrate Pink Shirt Day and stand together to take action against bullying?

Tomorrow, Friday 26 May is the day to get your pink shirt on.

Take a photograph and send it to communications@canterbury.ac.nz by 11am on Friday 26 May with a comment on speaking up, standing together and stopping bullying so we can show each other and the world through our UC comms channels our commitment to this great cause.

#pinkshirtdayNZ

Celebrated annually around the globe, Pink Shirt Day began in Canada in 2007 when two students took a stand against homophobic bullying, mobilising their whole school, after a peer was bullied for wearing a pink shirt.

Pink Shirt Day is led by the Mental Health Foundation, with support from: The Peace Foundation, RainbowYOUTH, InsideOUT, New Zealand Post Primary Teachers’ Association, Youthline and Family Works.

Pink Shirt

Using a teaching space? Consider your colleagues after you

With controls for sound, visuals and lighting at our fingertips during teaching activities, remember when finishing up, to reset the system.

It’s quick and simple. Create a habit, to do so, as soon as you finish.

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Reset by firmly pressing the power off button on the AMX Touch Panel.

This quickly restarts it, with sound, visual and lighting settings at their expected default levels.

Not resetting impacts the next users – your colleagues.

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If your colleagues have lecture capture programmed, they want to know that the microphones are actually picking up sound.

The visuals recorded are of little use without sound, when someone else has muted a microphone.

There is also no audio recording magically taking place either, without the Echo360 hardware installed… and a request, booking and the confirmation of lecture capture, in advance.

So, think of your colleagues: Reset your tech and put your microphone back correctly.