EDUCAUSE: Technologies and trends in higher education

Looking for recent research and surveys on instructional design, learning space design, IT governance and more?

UC has a membership to EDUCAUSE, a non-profit association whose mission is to advance higher education through the use of information technology. This membership provides access to benchmarking surveys, IT Tool Kits, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) research reports and the magazine EDUCAUSE Review, as well as networking opportunities.

With resources on teaching and learning (including student success, learning space design, and instructional design), enterprise IT (IT service delivery, budgeting and business intelligence), and cybersecurity (IT governance, risk and compliance), EDUCAUSE resources will be useful for staff across the university.

To access resources on EDUCAUSE, register on the site using your UC email address. (Note: EDUCAUSE manually processes registration requests which typically takes up to one business day to complete).

UC’s membership is administered by the Library. Please contact acquisitions@libr.canterbury.ac.nz if you have any queries.

Library Services on Dovedale Campus

UC Library is running a Library Express service on the Dovedale campus from Monday 19 February until the College of Education, Health and Human Development moves into Rehua.

This will operate Monday-Friday 11am-1pm in Kōtuku, with library staff available to provide assistance with using the library, catalogue help, guidance on distance services and other questions. Subject librarians for Education subjects will also be present for consultations (either scheduled or drop-in) during these hours.

We look forward to seeing you!

Be proud of creating this special place of remembrance – Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel spoke at the dedication of the new commemorative pathway and the sculpture Roimata on 22 February.

Her speech is reproduced here:

Pro Chancellor, Sue McCormick, Vice-Chancellor, Dr Rod Carr and UCSA President, Josh Proctor

My fellow councillors: Anne Galloway, Vicki Buck, Jimmy Chen, Mike Davidson, Phil Clearwater, and Sara Templeton

Thank you for the honour and the privilege of sharing this occasion with you as we unveil this commemorative sculpture, Roimata, and dedicate this part of the cycleway to the memory of the February 22 earthquake in 2011, both acknowledging and remembering the losses and injuries sustained by students, alumni and friends of the University.

Events to commemorate that day, act as reminders of all that we have lost, but on this occasion we will also be called upon to reflect on the incredible spirit that emerged from the community, exemplified at this place, the University of Canterbury, by the Student Volunteer Army.

I have not yet seen Roimata, but I am confident that when we see her, we will feel that Riki Manuel has captured both the sadness we feel on remembering that day and the generosity of spirit and courage that became the hallmarks of what followed.

The events of February 22, 2011 and the weeks, months and years that followed may have changed the face of Christchurch forever, but the heart of what makes us who we are as a community, a university and a city has been strengthened by our shared experience of grief and loss, coupled now with our immutable optimism for the future.

The University of Canterbury can be proud of the role it played and will continue to play as we turn lessons learned into global best practice for the future.

And today you can be proud of creating this special place of remembrance and honouring our shared sense of loss and the spirit that flowed from the tears.

He roimata o runga, he tangi he ua

He roimata o raro, he tangi maumahara

The tears from above, the grief of love

As the tears from our eyes are of remembrance

UC unveils sculpture, dedicates pathway on quake anniversary

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On the seventh anniversary of the 22 February earthquake, the University of Canterbury dedicated the Unicycle pathway along University Drive as a commemorative pathway to acknowledge of the courage and contribution of the University community, and the losses and injuries sustained by students, staff, alumni and friends of the University in the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes.

As part of this dedication, a specially commissioned sculpture, Roimata, was unveiled at the Clyde Road end of the Unicycle pathway. It has been designed for UC by Māori artist Riki Manuel.

Speaking the unveiling ceremony, Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel said the UC Student Volunteer Army was an example of extraordinary generosity.

SVA founder Sam Johnson and former UCSA President Erin Jackson also spoke at the event. Sam said he was often asked if there would be an SVA without the earthquakes and mentioned the thousands of primary school children who took part in SVA voluntary work across New Zealand last year. He praised the ongoing momentum and strength of the current SVA and noted that the SVA is now the largest student club at the University of Canterbury.

The sculpture Roimata tells a story of remembrance, and depicts a community ritual that has emerged from a tragedy that is now an inherent part of the heritage of Christchurch. The sculpture depicts a koru facing down, as it represents a life taken before fully grown. The undulating surface is rippled, to represent the river Ōtākaro |Avon, and a scattering of brass roses, cherry blossoms and daffodils on top represent the flowers that the people of Ōtautahi | Christchurch throw into the river each year on 22 February, in remembrance.

After the unveiling UC staff, students and guests were invited to throw flowers onto the river to flow into the city in time for the formal remembrance service at the National Earthquake Memorial in central Christchurch.

Watch and share the Cultural Narrative Video

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The Cultural Narrative is about how we reflect our distinct place and space at the University of Canterbury Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha in Ōtautahi Christchurch, and we now have a video> that underpins that narrative, and depicts the different ways we are doing that in our environment.

Over time, the narrative has evolved to be more than just about our environment, and this video is a tool that could also be about where we are and how we teach – whether it be in engineering, student services, in geography, or liberal arts.

Our environs, our buildings, our flora, our fauna, our naming and our signage are all parts that help create our distinctiveness, and how do we do that in a way that reflects both the ideology of the University and also the mana of the Tūāhuriri, the people of this land, Ngāi Tahu of the south, and Māori as part of a global community.

The Cultural Narrative is about the University. It is owned by the Senior Management Team, reflecting the leadership of the University, and is led by the UC Council who want to be seen as an institute that reflects this community. That leadership is partnered with Colleges, with service divisions and ultimately, the staff and students of UC.

This video encapsulates and embodies some of the aspirations of the University in this space. It is to be a useful and functional tool, for all of us, in terms of how we approach our understanding around this narrative and its application at the University.

The endeavours behind it are about creating physical and emotional markers that provide our graduates with a connection to place, and a connection to UC’s aspiration for their bi-cultural competence and confidence.

Thank you for sharing with us and we look forward to your continued engagement as the story unfolds. This is where we are now, a long way from where we have come, and a long way from where we will be in five years.

For an .mp4 copy of the video, please contact ripeka.hurunui@canterbury.ac.nz

Nāhaku noa, nā

Darryn Russell
Kaihautu Matua (Taupua)
Executive Director (Acting)
Te Ratonga Rauemi Ako
Learning Resources 

 

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