Are any of your courses recorded?

The system used for lecture capture is changing on Monday 20 November 2017.

An updated version of Echo360 is coming. It includes:

  • An improved look
  • New features, to benefit both teaching staff and students
  • A new system working in the background

How did the trial go?

We thank the teaching staff of the six courses trialing the new Echo360 this semester. Their survey found their opinion of the system, and the support provided, to be overwhelmingly positive.

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The student survey reported a high proportion finding it easy to use, and having an overall positive experience with it. This included accessing course recordings from a variety of locations, internet connections and devices.

How do I get started?

For teaching staff, starter familiarisation sessions are coming up in early November. They are on the Library calendar system, LibCal for booking.

There is concise guidance on Learn for using the new system.

A one-page summary of the changes is also there.

How can course recordings be transferred?

Course recordings will be stored differently. They have to be requested to be transferred, if needed. This would be if recordings are used each year, over and over.

Past course recordings will be on the old system for a limited time. Fill in a quick web form on Assyst to request a transfer.

Ngā mihi,

e-Learning Support and Audio Visual Services.

Throwing rocks at research

In a small, unassuming container on  Ilam
campus, rocks are being fired at building materials to
simulate a volcanic eruption. Associate Professors Ben Kennedy and Thomas Wilson and PhD student Mr George Williams are putting exterior building claddings to the test with the help of a full-scale ballistics cannon.

The cannon can accurately fire rocks at the same velocity as
they would be flung from a volcano – about 160 kilometres per hour.

(Below: PhD student Mr George Williams and Associate Professor Thomas Wilson.)

Chronicle George Williams Thomas Wilson

“It can fire rocks at the actual speed they come out of a volcano, andin turn we can work out the exact velocity and masses required to puncture holes in roofs, and also work out what the danger might be to people beneath those roofs,” says Associate Professor Kennedy.

The team has tested a number of building materials, including roofing iron, timber weatherboards and concrete slabs, with
quite destructive results. However, as George points out, that doesn’t necessarily mean rocks will breach buildings during a
volcanic eruption.

“I was testing just a single layer of sheet metal, for instance, and if you lower the speed just a little bit that drastically reduces its energy and its potential to keep carrying on through the house,” he says.

The programme of study, which has been building over the last five to eight years, is collecting empirical data in a controlled environment. Its focus is on three specific elements:

  • the hazard (rocks falling out of the sky)
  • what assets are exposed
  • what relates the first two elements, the vulnerability of built infrastructure and how much it can sustain.“Generally the New Zealand components performed better and were stronger than more fragile overseas infrastructure, which is probably due to our building systems to meet earthquake standards,” says Associate Professor Wilson.

    “Although volcanic eruptions rarely occur in a built environment the value of the research is immeasurable, particularly for advice if people are trapped in buildings, where is the safest place to take cover?

    “It will help us better design for disasters.Fundamentally it should help us save lives.”

Innovation and developments at UC Careers, Internship and Employment Centre

Chris Bridgman, Manager | Kaiwhakahaere of UC’s Careers, Internships and Employment Centre | Te Rōpū Rapuara, says students often come to the Centre unaware of the huge range of opportunities available to them.

“Many students think in terms of quite a prescribed pathway, but the world of work is changing rapidly, so we encourage students
to be alert to these changes and to seek opportunities to enhance their employability.”

Chris says the Careers Kit – a series of 74 brochures on all the major subjects taught at UC – helps illustrate some of the wide range of real-world career options.

“We are continuously working with employers, so we have current information about industry developments and what employers are looking for in well-rounded employees. Skills and qualities in high
demand include communication skills, analytical and critical thinking, interpersonal and team skills, and a work ethic.”

Chris says the Centre is also able to inform employers about how to attract young employees and what their expectations are.
“We offer an integrated model – our work with students is informed by our interaction with employers and vice versa.”

The Centre helps broker relationships with industry bodies and employer groups via numerous employer information sessions
and Careers Fairs throughout each year. The Careers team also manages UC’s Co-Curricular Record (CCR) system, which is
aligned to UC’s graduate attributes and formally recognises students’ extracurricular activities as evidence of their work readiness.

Although only in its second year, the CCR already features 40 different activities – ranging from Student Volunteer Army work to peer note-taking – and involves nearly 1,000 students.

Another relatively recent innovation is UC’s nationwide Parents as Career Educator (PACE) seminars. The PACE seminars are designed to help parents of students in Years 11 to 13 guide their teenagers to make informed decisions about their future. A UC Career
Consultant covers the world of work, how to make and support informed career decisions, and helpful career development resources.

“The seminars have proven to be very popular with parents, indicating how helpful they have been in assisting them to help
their school students,” says Chris.

The Centre works hard to listen to the student voice and adapt its services to be engaging and responsive. It advises those returning for postgraduate study and assists recent graduates with finding jobs through the UC CareerHub, which lists job vacancies.

“Increasingly we are seeing students right throughout their studies, which is the key to making the most of their time at university in terms of career planning and development.”

For further information, go to:
www.canterbury.ac.nz/careers