2018 Global 3Rs Award – apply before 1 June

Apply before June 1 for a 2018 Global 3Rs Award

The Global 3Rs Awards programme is a collaboration between AAALAC International and the IQ Consortium , recognising significant innovative contributions toward the 3Rs of animal research to advance ethical science, by any researcher (nominated author, principal investigator, or research team leader) in academia or industry in any area of biology (e.g., basic science, discovery, development, teaching, testing, manufacture for new medicines, vaccines, medical devices or healthcare products for humans and animals).

Up to four Global Awards (North America, Europe, Pacific Rim, and the Rest of World) will be presented in 2018 in the amount of USD$5,000 each. Award nominations should be based on a primary research paper that advances any of the 3Rs (i.e., the Refinement, Replacement or Reduction of animal use) and is published in a peer-reviewed journal in the last three years.

Erskine Programme – Visiting Fellow Profile: Nancy Niemi from Yale University, USA

Where you have come from and what do you teach?

I am from New Haven, Connecticut, USA.  At Yale University, I direct the Faculty Teaching Initiatives Program and the Center for Teaching and Learning.  I teach Education Theory and Practice across all disciplines. I also teach Sociology, particularly about different kinds of social stratification.

What interested you in the Erskine Programme/Why did you want to come to UC?

The Erskine Programme fascinated me because it was so different – its focus on teaching is rare for an international program, and I appreciate the dedication to excellent pedagogy and to the fruits that come from mixing scholars and instructors from all parts of the world.

What have you been doing at UC?

I have been teaching Gender & Leadership as part of Management 304:  Management Skills for a Diverse Workforce.  I also have been contributing to and will teach one session of the Management Department’s Doctoral Workshops on Teaching and Learning.  I am also in the middle of meeting with a host of different people who run and coordinate student and faculty teaching and learning initiatives on campus.  I’m so grateful to Erik Brogt and Sarah Wright for inviting me and for facilitating all the learning I’m doing.

 

Nancy and her husband Michael enjoying the view on the way to Akaroa.

What have you most enjoyed about your time here at UC/Christchurch?

There’s so much that it’s hard to pick just one thing.  I love Christchurch – the City has so much history and truly integrates its natural beauty with everyday life.  I walk to UC everyday through Hagley Park, and say hello to the magpies and marvel at the oak trees, as well as all the all the other vegetation that’s new to me.  I also like going to different supermarkets and looking (and eating!) the food that local folks enjoy. Speaking of local people, I have found everyone at the University and in the City to be extraordinarily friendly – I feel so welcome.

Erskine Programme – Visiting Fellow Profile: Simon Eveson from the University of York, UK

Where you have come from and what do you teach?

The University of York, in the UK (as opposed to York University, which is in Canada!). I teach in the Department of Mathematics. When I’m asked if I have preferences about which modules I teach, I usually say no.  As a result, I’ve taught a lot of different material over the years: computer skills, writing skills, numerical computation and lots of mathematics, from the very applicable to the rather pure.

What interested you in the Erskine Programme/Why did you want to come to UC?

I’ve known my UC host, Nick Dudley Ward, for a very long time and visited UC a couple of years ago, as part of a research project involving numerical simulations of seismic waves. An Erskine fellowship was an excellent opportunity to visit UC again, to see Nick and to talk to people with similar interests (especially graduate students). From the teaching point of view, I was able to lecture on topics that wouldn’t be combined into a single course in a Mathematics department, to a different type of audience.

What have you been doing at UC?

I’ve lectured on Deterministic Mathematical Models. Starting with material that I’ve taught many times, this course moved on to interesting applications that I hadn’t seen before. I’ve also talked about high-performance computing, mostly to graduate students, and will also present some more technical mathematical material to a similar audience. In between, Nick and I have done a little work on seismic waves.

What have you most enjoyed about your time here at UC/Christchurch?

Apart from 8am lectures? The students attending my lectures had a great attitude to their studies. The lecture theatre was always full (well, almost full at 8am). I met many of them individually to talk about particular queries and was always impressed by their commitment and their willingness to engage with difficulties, not dodge them. Swapping Yorkshire winter for NZ summer wasn’t a bad idea, either.

Simon enjoying a visit to the Tasman Glacier, with Mount Cook in the background