Spring Small Group Training at the UC RecCentre

Our popular Term 4  Small Group Training (SGT) courses are open for registration, just in time for Spring!
These courses are open to everyone (no membership required), so if you’re looking for a bit of extra motivation during your work week, we might have the perfect solution for you, just over the other side of University Drive!

What is Small Group Training? 

  • Short 6 week fitness courses, focusing on a specific fitness/mind body discipline. E.g. Boxing, Bootcamp, Yoga etc.
  • Our experienced instructors work with you, along with the same small group of people each week in a supportive and energising environment.
  • Workouts can be individualised to suit you and your experience, due to the small class size.
  • A great way to remain accountable and motivated to reach your health and fitness goals.

What’s on offer for Term 4?

To discover more, click on the courses above.
All sessions are held at the UC RecCentre and commence from week 2 of Term 4.

To sign up…
Just pop into see the Rec Centre reception team, or give us a call on ext 92433 and you can sign up over the phone.

Let us know if you have any questions!

 

Animals on Campus Policy – what you need to know

Following careful consideration of concerns relating to the presence of dogs in UC buildings, a decision was made to establish an Animals on Campus Policy which allows animals on campus if restrained, and restricts access to animals in UC buildings except for exceptional circumstances that have been approved by the Vice-Chancellor.

The starting point for the policy was to consider the health and safety of all staff and students, including phobias and allergies triggered by the close proximity of animals. All staff should have the right to a safe and healthy working environment.

Since the policy was announced, the Vice-Chancellor has received a total of nine requests to allow ten animals into buildings. In two of these occasions, medical evidence was provided explaining the animal concerned supported the wellbeing of a staff member.

The general argument from these requests is that the animal concerned (mainly but not exclusively dogs) has regularly come into UC buildings, in some cases for a number of years, and it would be inconvenient if a past practice was not allowed to continue. The requests assert that these animals have never caused a problem and in some cases, written support has also been provided by colleagues in close proximity to the animal concerned.

No requests have been made for a certified support animal, such as a seeing eye dog, or a dog to support the hearing impaired etc.  

The Vice-Chancellor concluded that a strict interpretation of the policy is the only way to ensure consistent and fair treatment and therefore advised all applicants that they were no longer able to bring their animals into UC buildings.

He did however offer a transition period, strictly for those that had already submitted an exemption request, which will end on 31 December 2018. Staff were strongly encouraged to contact their HR Advisor for other ways UC can provide support with emotional health and wellbeing.

For more, please refer to the Animals on Campus Policy, now available from the Policy Library>

Supporting FAQs:

  1. Why is there a need for this policy?
    To ensure we meet our obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act and to provide a framework for balancing the needs and wellbeing of all people on campus.
  2. Who is liable if an animal on campus injures a student, staff member, or another animal: is it the animal’s owner, or the University?
    It is possible that SMT members, Council members and the animal’s owner will all be liable.
  3. Are injuries caused by animals on campus (registered or unregistered) covered by ACC?
    Probably, but that’s for ACC to determine on a case by case basis.
  4. Is it possible to make a case to the Vice-Chancellor for a psychological support animal?
    Possibly, although it is determined on a case by case basis. An individual student or staff member’s preferences and needs will be balanced with those of others on campus, the operational business needs and other matters set out in the policy. If the animal is a disability support dog that is certified by one of the organisations listed in the policy then VC approval will not be required.
  5. If it is possible to make a case for a psychological support animal, will a medical certificate from  a GP, counsellor or psychologist suffice?
    It will be determined on a case by case basis. A clear diagnosis is more compelling than a letter of support from a GP, as most pet owners could suggest their animal provides them with psychological support. Other potential methods of supporting a staff member’s wellbeing will also be taken into account.

Paul O’Flaherty
Executive Director of Human Resources | Kaihautū Matua Pūmanawa Tangata

Half-yearly result shows steady financial performance for UC

Thank you to all staff for your sustained effort in recruiting and retaining students, for the ongoing commitment to world-class excellence and research and the extraordinary work undertaken to transform both the physical campus and our services.

The University of Canterbury (UC) is continuing to show steady financial performance, the six-monthly result to the end of June 2018 shows.

UC has advanced its growth strategy, starting the academic year with a big increase in new-to-UC students and receiving a further boost with a 22% increase in mid-year enrolments.

Our aim is to continue to grow the number of students coming to the University and staying in Canterbury, to increase research efforts and academic and technical job opportunities, and to collaborate with institutions in the region.

In the last year, UC was the fastest growing New Zealand university, attracting record numbers of students from Auckland and Wellington, as well as students and researchers from around the country and the world.

In the last 12 months we have had a record number of postgraduate students, including over 1,000 doctoral students. UC also achieved a record level of research income, hosted the greatest number of academic visitors in our history and attracted record levels of philanthropic support for scholarships and research.

Emerging from the difficult post-quake environment, UC has learnt much in the past eight years. It has a deep understanding of how to respond to a crisis, it is much more open to collaboration, and it has developed tools to manage with constrained resources.

The six-monthly result to the end of June 2018 shows continued steady financial performance as the University competes strongly in the commercial environment of student recruitment locally and globally, while investing in exciting new, state-of-the-art facilities.

UC is completing over $1.1 billion of capital investment, largely in research and teaching infrastructure to support 21st century science and engineering, new business models and digital technologies.

The College of Science’s new five-storey Ernest Rutherford building and the College of Engineering’s state-of-the-art facilities are now fully open, while the University is completing the Rehua building for the College of Education, Health and Human Development, the MBA and Business Taught Masters Programmes and the Centre of Entrepreneurship led by the College of Business and Law, and Haere-roa, the new University of Canterbury Students’ Association (UCSA) building.

The University’s $5 million surplus represents the result of operations to 30 June 2018, which is not representative of the full year where the cycle of earnings is annual. The majority of student-related earnings are made in the first half of the financial year.  The current projection for the 31 December 2018 annual result is a surplus of $5 million.

For the first half of 2018, UC recognised revenue of $191.4 million (compared to 2016’s half-yearly result of $185.4 million). By the year end, UC is projecting to have increased its Equivalent Full Time Student (EFTS) numbers over 2017 in both domestic and full-fee paying (international) new-to-UC students, and in student numbers overall.

Operating expenditure was $186.4 million in the same period (30 June 2017: $172.2 million). 

The University continues to maintain adequate cash balances, with total cash holdings at 30 June 2018 (defined as current and term deposits) $295.3 million (30 June 2017: $349.0 million; 31 December 2017: $252.6 million).  The University receives the significant majority of its operating cash revenue early in the year during its main enrolment period. These balances are almost entirely committed to funding the University’s capital investment plan and EFTS expansion initiatives.

Net tangible assets per security ($1,000 face value) as at 30 June 2018 were $27,488 (30 June 2017: $27,878; 31 December 2017: $27,359).

Ngā mihi,

Dr Rod Carr
Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae

How you can WIN the best small stories from Aotearoa New Zealand


The latest Canterbury University Press (CUP) publication, Bonsai: Best small stories from Aotearoa New Zealand, showcases carefully chiseled works that are provocative, tender and endlessly surprising, composed with precision in a form where every word counts.

Edited by leading Aotearoa New Zealand flash fiction writers Michelle Elvy, Frankie McMillan and James Norcliffe, this pioneering collection of short short works includes flash fiction, prose poetry and haibun from 165 emerging and established authors such as Bill Manhire, Selina Tusitala Marsh and Michele Leggott.

“In flash fiction, something small can be powerful; an individual’s imagination can be set free. It is a language-driven form, either subtle or fiery. Experimental in its very nature; it will surprise time and again. And it’s an equal opportunity form: new writers are as likely to shine as experienced writers,” co-editor Michelle Elvy explains.

Bonsai will be launched at the close of WORD Christchurch Festival this Sunday 2 September, 6.30pm at Scorpio Books, Christchurch. All staff and students welcome.

With book design by award-winning Aaron Beehre, Bonsai is a beautifully produced volume. Purchase your own copy of Bonsai: Best small stories from Aotearoa New Zealand from UBS (University Bookshop), or go in the draw to win a copy by answering the following question.

  1. How many stories are there in the Bonsai collection? Find a hint, here.

Please email your answer to universitypress@canterbury.ac.nz by 12 noon Wednesday 5 September. The winner will be drawn at random and announced in Intercom | Pā mai tō reo on Friday 7 September.

A mid-winter summer for five UC students

During July’s mid-year break, Jade Humphrey, Kerridwen Russ, Natalie McHugh, Ruby Maurice and I had the opportunity to participate in the week-long Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT)’s Land-Sky-Ocean summer school in Weihai, China.

Participants consisted of over 68 students from seven different countries, which provided a fantastic opportunity to learn not only about Chinese culture, but also South Korea, Russia, and Vietnam.

The first few days of the programme focused on language learning classes and academic seminars, interspersed with opportunities to explore Weihai and the HIT campus.

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Photos courtesy of the group’s takeover of the @ucnz Instagram feed.

The academic seminars focused on the latest research being conducted at HIT. I particularly enjoyed the seminar on satellite design given by Associate Professor Wu Baolin. It was amazing to see undergraduate students developing and launching working satellites so early on in their academic career.

The last days of the programme focused on sharing and learning from our respective cultures. For our cultural exchange, we sang a traditional Māori waiata, Tūtira Mai Ngā Iwi and showcased the facilities and lifestyle of UC.

From the perspective of a commerce student, this trip was invaluable both personally and professionally.  The experience challenged our ideas about China, international collaboration and helped shape us to become more well-rounded students and individuals.

Professionally, this trip has given me the experience to tackle the challenges of coordinating global supply chains that I’ll face in my graduate position next year.

I encourage all students, regardless of their study area, to get involved with the international opportunities that UC has to offer as they are truly life-changing.

We are extremely grateful to the International Relationships Office and our respective departments for providing us with the opportunity to represent UC in this programme.

Jared McNicoll, BCOM.

Find out more about Global Opportunities available through UC here>