Access Your Computer Remotely

Are there times when you are away from your computer and would like to access your full computer desktop as if you are sitting at your desk – with access to your network drives, Outlook, and applications – from somewhere outside the University, or perhaps from another computer elsewhere in the University?

If so, Remote Access is for you. Options for Remote Access are explained in the Technology Information for Staff website.

Note that:

  1. To have remote access, you must contact the IT Service Desk to organise setting up remote access to your computer.
  2. If you have been upgraded to Windows 10, you must install the UC Remote Desktop Utility before your remote access will work.

The Technology Information for Staff website is your go-to place for information about the technology that you are likely to use regularly at the University of Canterbury.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

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Install the UC Remote Desktop Utility

If you have been upgraded to Windows 10, you must install the UC Remote Desktop Utility before your remote access will work.

Remote Access refers to the ability to access your full computer desktop as if you are sitting at your desk – with access to your network drives, Outlook, and applications – from somewhere outside the university, or perhaps from another computer elsewhere in the university.

NOTE: To have remote access, you must contact the IT Service Desk to organise setting up remote access to your computer.

The part you have to do is to install the UC Remote Desktop Utility:

  1. Open the Software Center
    – to search for this, click the magnifying glass icon at the far left end of your computer’s taskbar (lower left corner of your screen), then type Software Center
    – the Software Center displays
  2. Click in the search box in the upper right corner of the Software Center, then type Remote Desktop Utility and press the Enter key
    – two installation package options for Remote Desktop Utility will display (one is to install it, one is to uninstall it)
  3. Make sure that when you initially hover your mouse over the installation package it displays the words “UC Remote Desktop Utility – Enable Access
  4. Click the one with the words Enable Access
  5. Click the Install button
    – the package will install quickly.

NOTE: If you receive an error message then the Remote Desktop Utility has already been installed (probably by your upgrader). Do not worry if this occurs.

Providing you have been set up for remote access by the IT Service Desk, you can now use Remote Access. To learn more about Remote Access, see the Technology Information for Staff section on Remote Access.


For more great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Celebrate Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academia made by Professor Katharina Naswall and Professor Philip Armstrong as part of the Professorial Lecture Series in 2018

  • Date: Thursday 4 October 2018 from 4:30 – 6:00pm
  • Location: F3 Forestry

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the University we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

‘Shakespeare’s Animal Parts’
Presented by Professor Philip Armstrong, School of Humanities & Creative Arts

“There are lots of animals in Shakespeare: over 4,000 references to animals are scattered through the plays and poems, representing hundreds of different species. Yet scholars are uncertain about whether any actual animals ever appeared on Shakespeare’s stage in the Globe theatre. My talk will address both of these issues. I’ll survey some of the surprising things that Shakespeare’s animals tell us about his art and the world in which he lived, and I’ll also speculate on what kinds of animals might actually have appeared as ‘actors’ in the play’s original performances. My aim is to show that by paying attention to animals, we gain an extra appreciation of the richness and diversity both of Shakespeare’s world and of our own.”

‘Could the time you spend at work be good for your health and wellbeing?”
Presented by Professor Katharina Naswall, Department of Psychology

Work takes up a large part of life for many, and tends to affect how we feel. Technology has enabled greater flexibility to fit work to life outside work, but technology has also made it more difficult to switch off from work. If work provided a source of positive influence and supporting health and wellbeing, work has the potential to improve lives well outside the scope of the regular working day – work can become part of the solution to improving health and wellbeing in New Zealand. My research focuses on how work can become a positive influence in people’s lives, and creating a work environment which is inclusive of different cultures and values. This is done building on knowledge gathered from New Zealand organisations, and work on building a framework for organisations to support employees to better health and wellbeing. In my vision, workplaces are part of the solution for improving societal health and wellbeing. In my talk, I outline a few of the lines of research I have been pursuing to work towards this vision, and a few ideas for future research.

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

UC on Wheels arrives in India

International Recruitment Coordinator Sandeep Sharma recently returned from two weeks touring International High Schools in India to promote UC and launch the much anticipated UC on Wheels campaign.  He shares his experience with us here.

UC on Wheels is a unique concept that introduces prospective students to UC through storytelling.

Our International Relationships Office (IRO) representative (in this instance, myself), starts by initiating conversation with the students on a topic of global relevance (i.e. Global Citizenship) before the accompanying UC academic (in this case Dr Moffat Mathews) leads the discussion using a lecture style delivery for thirty minutes, allowing students to experience a UC style of in-class teaching and learning.

This is followed by an essay writing competition before an alumni representative speaks with the students about their experience at UC.

To round out the visit, students are given information about UC colleges and related programs before experiencing a 360 degree ‘tour’ of campus thanks to a specially equipped VR headset.

Over the course of two weeks we visited over 1000 students in fourteen schools across four cities, including SelaQui International School (Dehardun), National Public School (Bangalore) and India International School (Bangalore), who signed a memoranda of understanding with UC in June of this year.

If you’re interested in accompanying IRO to India for trips like this, we would love to have you. I’ll be organising meetings with all colleges soon to discuss opportunities in the new year.

Colleges will need to cover the costs associated with sending staff on such trips however we recommend giving this strong consideration as it could lead to a great return on investment for future intakes.

Following the success of his Indian tour, Sandeep will soon depart for United Arab Emirates and Oman, and is highly confident of the potential in this market.

To hear more about the great work coming out of our International Relationships Office, keep an eye on Intercom or contact the team here>