Take a look inside Haere-roa

Haere-roa, the new UCSA building, is getting closer to opening day.

It’s been a long journey getting to this point, involving hundreds of generous alumni and staff donors who have given nearly $3 million to our students’ 51% share of the new building.

To help staff and students get to know Haere-roa, the UCSA are doing weekly video updates on the construction. Each week will highlight a new and exciting area – everything from the iconic Ngaio Marsh Theatre to the plush new Bentley’s Lounge.

First up, UCSA President Sam Brosnahan talks about how far the building has come.

To learn more about Haere-roa,  please visit the UCSA’s website. You can also follow Haere-roa on Facebook to learn more about upcoming events like concerts and shows.

Spotting a social engineering scam

In some previous cyber security posts we’ve mentioned a couple of types of scams that use social engineering, eg. phishing. Social engineering is a way of tricking people into sharing their personal information.

Here, we’re going to talk about the equally dangerous non-technical social engineering attacks that we all may face.

These scammers use little pieces of information they already know about you to trick you into revealing sufficient information that they can then defraud you. This is called ‘pretexting’ or ‘vishing’ voice-phishing and is often done through a phone call.

If you receive a phone call you are uncertain about, hang-up the call and find a phone number for the organisation to call them back, don’t call any phone number the caller gives you.

It’s ok to say no – think about the information you are being asked for when filling out forms, having conversations or responding to emails:

  • is what they are saying believable?
  • why do they need this information?
  • are they making a reasonable request for this purpose?
  • is this person who they say they are?

Read these examples and check out this video to understand what social engineering might sound like. Read more about cyber security and reporting incidents at UC here>

Hi, this is Tracey calling from {Your Bank}.

We’ve blocked some suspicious overseas charges made on your card ending {last 4 digits of your card}, and we’d like to check on these with you, if that’s OK.

Before we can do that I need to run you through some security checks.

Can you please confirm the billing address for the card is correct?

Great thanks. Can you please confirm your mother’s maiden name? 

OK, we’re good to go. Have you been to a restaurant called La Roux earlier today? Spending $43.20?

No, OK, we’ll need to cancel your card and issue you a new one.

Don’t worry, we can get the new card to you quickly, if I get this processed now I can get it to you in the next 48hrs.

To make things easy for you I can make sure the same PIN number is used so you will be able to use the card straight away.

If you can confirm your PIN number I’ll get that added.

Awesome, that is done, your new card is on its way.

As you can see the scammer now has your card number, answer to your security question and current PIN number.

This example would be carried out after a wallet has been stolen. The initial information comes from a receipt found in your wallet.

Hi {your name},

This is Tracey from {names a store you have a receipt from found in your wallet}, you’ve won a gift card worth $150 that you can pick up next time you are in the {names location of the store from the receipt} store.

To secure the card for you I need to put a PIN number on the it, what PIN number would you like me to add to the card?

All done. That card will be waiting for you in store.

Have a good day.”

Unfortunately, most people will provide their own banking PIN number, because by human nature, we’re lazy and use the same PIN numbers or passwords for multiple purposes.

New and improved library tool on UCGo

The Library tile on UCGo has been upgraded with fully integrated functionality. That means you will be able to see your current loans, what you’ve requested and any fines you have owing. You’ll also be able to search the library catalogue and see other library resources right from your phone.

UCGo is a free mobile app primarily for UC students, but staff can also access some tools including the upgraded library tool by logging in with your staff credentials. The app brings together tools such as LEARN, support on campus and key UC dates, it is also a great way for staff to see what is being communicated to students through Insider’s Guide.

Download UCGo today from the App Store and Google Play, find out more here>

Celebrating Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Pavel Castka and Professor Tom Cochrane in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date:               Thursday, 6 June, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.

Location:        E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

 “Universal Language of the Future? Addressing business challenges through international standards” – Presented by Professor Pavel Castka, Department of Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship

 How can businesses address social and environmental issues – such as climate change, social responsibility, poverty or child labour – in a vastly diverse world with different opinions on these issues?  Is there a common platform or universal language that can facilitate the interaction between businesses across the world – enabling addressing of these challenges as well as challenges of everyday cooperation of firms in global supply chains?

In this inaugural professorial lecture, I will build on research at UC as well as my involvement with international standard setting NGOs – including International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) and International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) – and discuss the status quo as well as future challenges of standards setting, adoption and control mechanisms that ensure consistency of international standards across the globe. The lecture is designed for a diverse audience that is interested in social and environmental issues as well as in the generic matters of cooperation in international business – inclusive of non-academic audience such as business leaders or social activists. The lecture provides an insight into the exciting world of international standards, potentially the universal language of the future.

 

Food–energy–water nexus in the Mekong” – Presented by Professor Tom Cochrane, Department of Civil & Natural Resources Engineering

 The Mekong basin in Southeast Asia is undergoing rapid development.  Basin wide water infrastructure development (hydropower/irrigation), climate change and land-use change are causes for concern due to potential impacts on highly valued fisheries, agriculture, and natural ecosystems. Extensive water, sediment and nutrient modelling and analyses were thus conducted to understand the food-energy-water nexus in the basin and assess future threats and evaluate alternative pathways. Results show that recent development of flood protection dykes, as well as sea level rise and land subsidence pose a major threat to the long term sustainability of the Mekong Delta. Future adaptation and mitigation strategies should include optimal operation of water infrastructure (hydropower, dykes, and irrigation systems) to reduce hydrological and sediment changes, reduction in groundwater pumping, water storage management, sea level rise protection infrastructure, land reclamation, enhancement of coastal and in-stream habitats, and others.  A single solution is not sufficient for this complex basin; multiple mitigation initiatives are necessary through transboundary communication and coordination. The analysis and methods, as well as the lessons learnt in this research can be translated to other river systems around the world undergoing rapid development and climatic threats.

Professor Ian Wright

Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

Teaching Month is coming

Want to hear some new ideas about teaching at UC? Have a quick look at what’s coming up this year in UC’s Teaching Month in July.

Come for a coffee, stay to hear:

– the Vice-Chancellor’s thoughts on the future of teaching at UC;

– how teaching can help you get promoted;

– how you can contribute to teaching leadership at UC;

– opportunities for funding your teaching ideas;

– technology-enabled learning possibilities

and much more.