ERSKINE PROGRAMME GRANT PROFILE – ANNICK MASSELOT

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Annick Masselot in Cambridge

What Department/School have you come from and what do you teach?
I come from the School of Law. I teach Employment Law and Advanced Employment Law, Contract Law, Gender and the Law, European Union Law and Legal Research Methods.  I also do some teaching in the Executive Development Programme where I teach Business Law for the MBA and the MBM degrees.

What interested you in the Grant opportunity?
One of my present line of research is concerned with the gender impact of Brexit. People wrongly think that Brexit and, what are considered to be the most relevant issues: Trade and migration, are gender neutral topics.  In reality, the most adversely impacted people are likely to be the least visible people: women and people from minority backgrounds.

The Cambridge Grant provided me with the opportunity to be based and do research in the United Kingdom at a time when political and legal developments around this theme were at their peak. The Grant further offered me the opportunity to be at Cambridge University where I could interact with experts in the field of constitutional and European Union law and political as well as gender studies scholars. As Cambridge is central to the UK, I knew I was also going to be able to do research in London, in particular at the British Parliament. I was also able to work with NGO and think tanks.

Being in the UK also provided a chance for me to disseminate my work in the country and also in other European Countries.

The grant is generous enough that I was able to do research without  worrying about where to live and I could take my family with me, which was a real bonus.

Where did you visit (i.e which institutions)?
I was a recipient of the Cambridge Grant so I spent most of my time at Cambridge University, where I was based in the Centre for European Legal Studies in the Faculty of Law.  During my time at Cambridge, I was also invited to deliver talks in other institutions.

  • ‘Gendertrouble while approaching the cliff edge Brexit?’ Queen’s University Belfast, The Centre for European and Transnational Studies, Belfast, 7 October 2019
  • ‘Jacinda Ardern and the development of a model of feminist foreign policy?’ feminist foreign policy in the EU context, Quaker Council for European Affairs, Brussels, 26 September 2019
  • ‘The gender impact of Brexit – Unpacking the ideology of socio-political institutions’, School of Law, Reading University, 16 October 2019 (with Roberta Guerrina UoBristol).

How will your time overseas benefit your teaching at UC?
The Cambridge Grant is mostly a research grant, as such it does not really consider teaching. However, I was also invited as a guest lecturer in the Jean Monnet Summer School on Gender and Brexit: Processes and Strategies for Gender Mainstreaming in the Process of Exiting the EU, University of Surrey (UK), 3-8 July 2019.

I delivered two lectures to a range of students and practitioners on (1) EU as a Gender Actor from Internal to External Affairs and (2) Gendering External Affairs – How is Trade gendered?

This experience together with the ability to share experience on European Union practices and on Brexit with practitioners provides unique experience which can be translated into vivid lectures at the University of Canterbury. Having first hand expertise in a topic makes us better teacher because we know what is going on on the ground.  

 Do you have any advice for potential future Grant applicants?
Don’t be shy, go forth and meet people outside UC.

 

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