Teaching professional development opportunities in February

As part of UC’s renewed strategic focus on professional development in teaching, Academic Development, E-Learning Support and the Student Support units will be starting a series of short (90 minute) workshops aimed at teaching staff starting next week. These workshops will cover commonly encountered teaching issues and dovetail with existing professional development offerings through HR Learning & Development.

For February, we have the following workshops on offer:

WorkshopDateTimeLocation
Supporting the student transition to universityTue, Feb 410:00 – 11:30Rehua 103
Authentic assessmentTue, Feb 42:00 – 3:30Rehua 103
Engaging students during lectureWed, Feb 59:00 – 12:00Rehua 101
Web conferencing for teaching and learningWed, Feb 52:00 – 3:30Rehua 529
Providing pastoral support for studentsWed, Feb 121:00 – 2:30Forestry Lectorial F1
Working with international studentsThu, Feb 1312:00 – 1:30Rehua 329
Supporting English as Additional Language studentsMon, Feb 1710:30 – 12:00Beatrice Tinsley 112
Principles of course designFri, Feb 212:00 – 3:30Rehua 530

The full list of workshops, dates and times and registration for semester 1 can be found here. For queries, contact Erik Brogt (Academic Development) or Nick Ford (E-Learning Support).

New year – new kit in your UC personal emergency kit bag

UC Personal Emergency Kit
UC Personal Emergency Kit

With the new year upon us, now is a good time to take stock and refresh your UC personal emergency kit. Check and assess the contents of your kit bag regularly. Ensure it is well equipped to assist you in an emergency event. Replace or refresh water, snacks and other perishable items.

Due to sustainability considerations, we will no longer supply plastic water bottles in the personal emergency kit bags. We recommend you put your own filled reusable water bottle into your kit bag and refresh it annually.

UC International College’s EER Result

In their most recent External Evaluation and Review (EER), NZQA has rated UC International College (UCIC) as a Category 1 provider in New Zealand. UCIC has been awarded ‘Highly Confident’ in Educational Performance and ‘Highly Confident’ in Capability in Self-Assessment. This is the highest possible rating that can be awarded and is an endorsement  of the excellent learning and teaching environment that UCIC strives to provide for its international students.

UCIC first opened its doors in October 2013 offering just one pathway programme through to the University of Canterbury. Less than six and half years later, UCIC has a suite of pathway programmes for international students, a Category 1 rating by NZQA, has acquired one of the oldest English Language schools in Christchurch, CCEL (also a Category 1 provider), and offers a truly embedded pathway model to one of Navitas’ highest ranking University Partners globally. UCIC offers four University Transfer Programmes (UTPs), a Foundation Studies Certificate and short Study Abroad options for International students.

UCIC would like to thank the University of Canterbury, all staff with whom we have had a collaborative relationship over the past number of years, particularly those who met with the NZQA evaluators as a part of the recent External Evaluation and Review process.

For more details, please refer to UCIC website www.ucic.ac.nz   

Remembering Emeritus Professor Kenneth Strongman

Many staff and alumni of the University of Canterbury will be saddened to hear of the death of Emeritus Professor Kenneth Strongman on 29 December 2019. After completing his PhD at University College London in 1964, and taking up positions as a Lecturer and Senior Lecturer at the University of Exeter, he was appointed as Professor of Psychology at the University of Canterbury in 1979, where he remained for 41 years. He was Head of the Department of Psychology from 1982 to 1997, and subsequently Pro-Vice-Chancellor of Arts and Assistant Vice Chancellor (Government & Community Relations). He became Professor Emeritus on his retirement in 2010 but continued to contribute actively to academic life, including seeing the humanities included within the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Ken achieved wide recognition for his extensive academic research, teaching and service. His research was principally in the field of emotions. His text “The Psychology of Emotion” ran through five editions and was widely cited. Ken also edited the first international collection of essays (1991) in a field that was only just emerging. His undergraduate students remember him for his clear and easy lecturing style. The many PhD students he successfully supervised remember him for his insight, his endless encouragement and patience, and the genuine pleasure he took in their achievements. As a psychologist he always insisted on the discipline’s historic dual place as both a science and an art, and its application to everyday life.

A lifelong believer in the role of academics in society more broadly, Ken took on numerous roles outside the university. He was active in the university teachers’ union. His activities in Christchurch included chairing the Arts Centre management board and extensive writing for The Press, especially as a television and book reviewer. He regularly gave public lectures to audiences on a wide variety of topics. An avid squash player for much of his academic life, he will be missed by colleagues and friends from across the University, New Zealand, and the world.

Emeritus Professor Brian Haig, Professor Simon Kemp, Nathan Consedine 

 

Pause Breathe Smile – Mindfulness Course for Children

Does your child struggle with anxiety or stress? Would you like to support them to learn skills to enhance their wellbeing?

  • The Psychology Centre is offering Pause Breathe Smile (PBS), a group for children (aged 8-11 years) who struggle with stress and anxiety to develop skills of mindfulness.  PBS is an evidence-based program, developed by the Mental Health Foundation, found to improve focus and attention, enhance self-awareness and reduce stress.
  • The group will run from 4 – 5pm, starting Wednesday 19 February for 8 weeks at the Psychology Centre, University of Canterbury. It requires both child and parent/caregiver to attend and learn together.  The total cost of the program is $125.
  • For more information, please email justine.brougham@canterbury.ac.nz

View the following YouTube clip to hear children explain PBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awo8jUxIm0c

Further information about the research and benefits of PBS can be found here: http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/ED1707/S00094/pause-breathe-smile-mindfulness-training-will-help.htm