All posts by hks24

Important Graduation update – city street processions cancelled

UC has decided to cancel the city street processions for the upcoming April Graduation following advice from the police. The Graduation ceremonies will continue as planned. Please see the details below.

While there is no information to suggest a specific risk to our graduands and attendees, UC takes the safety and wellbeing of all students and staff seriously. The events of 15 March have had a deep impact on our community and UC will continue to work with police as appropriate for future Graduation ceremonies.

On the day

Graduands
Congregate in the Limes Room by 9.00am (morning ceremonies) and 1.00pm (afternoon ceremony).  

Staff party
Arrive by 9.20am (morning ceremonies) and 1.20pm (afternoon ceremony) at the Kilmore Room (mezzanine above the foyer).

VIP guests
Arrive by 9.30am (morning ceremonies) and 1.30pm (afternoon ceremony) at the Kilmore Room (mezzanine above the foyer).

Graduand guests/ticket holders
The auditorium doors will open at 9am (morning ceremonies) and 1pm (afternoon ceremony) and graduands guests/ticket holders need to be seated by 9.20am and 1.20pm. Doors will stay open until 9.40am and 1.40pm. No one will be let in in whilst the stage party and graduands are processing in and on to the stage or during the National Anthem.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccines available at UC Health Centre

The UC Health Centre | Whare Hauora o UC is now offering Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccinations to all UC students and staff who have: 

  • never been vaccinated
  • only had one MMR vaccination.

Note – international students will be charged $25 per MMR vaccine.

If you’re not sure if you’ve been immunised for measles contact the UC Health Centre if you are enrolled there, or your General Practitioner (GP) – they can check your vaccination history.

People born before 1969 are considered to be low risk and do not require vaccination. Many of this group will have had measles.

The number of confirmed measles cases in Canterbury is now at 37, with a further nine cases being investigated.

Measles is a serious and highly infectious illness that spreads easily from person to person through the air, and can be caught simply by being in the same room as someone with measles. Read more about immunisation and symptoms here.

Measles update

The number of confirmed measles cases in Canterbury has now reached 30.

Measles is a serious and highly infectious illness that spreads easily from person to person through the air, and can be caught simply by being in the same room as someone with measles.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms are usually a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery eyes, and sometimes small white spots in the mouth. Over the next few days a blotchy rash appears, starting on the face and behind the ears, and moving down the body.

If you develop any of these symptoms stay at home and phone the UC Health Centre if you are enrolled there or your General Practitioner (GP) for advice as soon as possible.   

Immunisation

  • If you have had two doses of the measles vaccine (MMR – Mumps, Measles and Rubella), have had the measles before, or were born before 1969 you are unlikely to develop the measles.
  • Those born between 1969 and 1990 are considered to have a good level of protection. This group were offered one measles vaccine and evidence suggests that one dose of MMR protects 95% of people from developing measles.
  • If you’re not sure if you’ve been immunised for measles, contact your health service provider – they can check your vaccination history.

Priority group for vaccination
To ensure vaccines are being provided to those in greatest need, a vaccination programme is being rolled out by general practices which prioritises those who need it most.  

The immediate priority is those aged 12 months to 28 years who have never been immunised. As more vaccine becomes available the MMR vaccine will be made available to other priority groups.

If you are enrolled at the UC Health Centre, meet the criteria for vaccination and have not yet been contacted, please call the UC Health Centre to book in for your MMR vaccine. Otherwise please contact your General Practitioner (GP).  

Band Together – 12pm today, C Block lawn

Time: 12 – 12.30pm
Date: Monday 18 March
Location: C Block lawn
RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/2288962974706666/

We know Friday’s events continue to have a deep impact on people and we are committed to supporting the safety and wellbeing of all students and staff. Our love and support are with everyone and help is available and you are not alone.

As an act of solidarity and support we invite the UC community to band together for a period of reflection, and to support one another.

The gathering will open with a moment of silence and karakia and will be followed by the sharing of halal kai. There will be time to pause and quietly reflect on the past few days, as well as leave a message on the Kia Kaha wall.

As an act of solidarity and to unite in a demonstration of inclusiveness, female students and staff are welcome to wear head scarves. This is a matter of personal choice.

Classes scheduled between 12pm – 1pm have been cancelled.
Lectures scheduled from 11am – 1pm will run from 11am – 12pm.
Lectures scheduled from 12pm – 2pm will run from 1pm – 2pm.

Update and support for students and staff

Kia ora koutou,

As a university community we condemn the attacks in Christchurch and extend our solidarity and support to our community, especially our Muslim staff and students and their whānau.

We continue to offer support to all students and staff. We would like to remind our students and staff that there is help available and you are not alone. Please see below for more details.

A drop in centre will be available tomorrow, Sunday 17 March, for students and staff from 10am – 1pm in the Puaka-James Hight Library, where support will be available.

The UC Students’ Association and clubs, including SVA are providing outreach support to students. All tests and assignments are cancelled from 18 – 24 March. Your course coordinator will be in touch. Special consideration and allowances will be available. More details to follow.

Any staff needing support should talk to their manager. Additional Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) professionals have been relocated to their Christchurch office to provide dedicated onsite support throughout the coming weeks. If you require EAP support, please call them on 0800 327 669 at any time.

We anticipate the University will be fully open and operating as usual on Monday 18 March. On Monday at 12pm the UC community will gather together on C-Block lawn to show solidarity and support for one another. More details to come on Sunday afternoon.

If you are you concerned about your safety or have any information you wish to report, need any support or have any questions contact communications@canterbury.ac.nz or 0800 823 637.

We know this will have a deep impact on people and we are committed to supporting our UC community, especially the safety and wellbeing of all staff and students. We’d like to remind everyone to take care of themselves and each other, to seek help early, and that counselling is available for UC students and staff.

Professor Cheryl de la Rey
Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae


Common reaction to traumatic events and news

Over the next few days or weeks you may experience any of the following emotions. Please remember this is a normal reaction as the healing process takes place. Everybody’s individual experience will be different, and different people will react in a different way. You may find that your reaction is delayed.

Some common emotional responses are:

  • Shock, numbness
  • Confusion
  • Moodiness and irritability
  • Anxiety, worrying, panic
  • Jumpiness, hyper-vigilance
  • Guilt
  • Feeling of helplessness
  • Sadness, depression
  • Fatigue
  • Disturbing images or memories
  • Nausea, headaches
  • Feeling vulnerable or unsafe
  • Social withdraw
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Anger and blame of others
  • Numbness or feeling like you are not reacting 
Reasons for feeling anxious during and after traumatic events

There are many reasons why you may still feel distressed after an event. It may be because:

  • Someone you care about was injured or passed away, and you are grieving over your loss.
  • You are supporting your children who are traumatised.
  • Those events remind you of past distressing events in your life.
  • You worry about your safety.
  • People around you continue to show signs of stress due to the events.
Coping with these reactions

Below are some helpful tips that could help you and those who are close to you cope with stress reactions:

  • Allow yourself to experience those thoughts and feelings (even if you are not directly affected).
  • Talk openly about your thoughts and feelings to someone you trust.
  • Take time to look after yourself – make sure you keep doing things that you enjoy (eg. taking walks, hobbies, music, reading etc.).
  • Allow others to experience their thoughts and feelings, remembering that their reactions and timing of reactions may be different to yours.
  • Limit your exposure to social media and media reports, and monitor how the information may affect you.
  • Spend time with people you care about, including family and friends.
  • Seek support.
Seeking support

If you need to talk to a trained counsellor, free call or text 1737 from your mobile phone.

There are a number of services on campus you can contact for help at UC:

  • Student Care (https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/support/needtotalk) – Student Care can provide you a place to talk to someone if you do not know what to do, and also have a team of dedicated Student Advisors for both domestic and international students.
  • UC Health Centre (https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/healthcentre) – you can make an appointment to talk to a health professional including nurses, doctors and counsellors to help you get through this difficult time. If you need to be seen straight away, please tell the Health Centre reception staff that your situation is urgent; they will then find a health professional you can talk to.
  • UCSA Advocacy and Welfare (https://ucsa.org.nz/student-support/advocacy-welfare/) can help you if you are experiencing financial difficulties at this time, including support with food, and can help you communicate with your teaching staff and apply for extensions and Special Consideration if you are finding your study is being affected; and
  • UC Chaplains (https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/support/health/chaplains), who are available if you need someone to talk to.

There are also additional resources and support services in the community that you can access from home, and can assist non-students who you know have been affected are:

  • Lifeline: 0800 543 354
  • Need To Talk: 1737 (free text or phone)
  • Victim Support: 0800 842 846
Supporting Each Other

International students and students from minority groups may be feeling especially vulnerable or affected. Please remember to check-in with one another, ask “Are you okay?”, and encourage each other to contact family and loved ones (especially those outside of Christchurch) as often as they need to. If there is anything they need, please encourage them to contact the many support services available both inside and outside the University community.

If you are concerned about a friend, flatmate, or other acquaintance who may not be reaching out but still needs assistance, please contact any of the above services who may be able to get in touch with that person.

After the Christchurch Earthquakes in 2010 and 2011, people from all across the city came together to support each other, and create new feelings of community and mutual support. Difficult circumstances can often unite people. Many people within our emergency services and the general public risked their own safety to help those who were suffering. We believe that our city and community will respond with that same spirit of togetherness and mutual support again.