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Erskine Programme – Academic Exchange Programmes now open

Just a reminder that nominations are being received for the following academic exchange programmes in 2019, which are offered through the Erskine Programme Office

– Canterbury, Cambridge and Oxford Fellowships (for academics coming to UC); and
– Canterbury, Cambridge and Oxford Grants (for UC academics going overseas).

The closing date for nominations is 11 May 2018. For further information please see https://intranet.canterbury.ac.nz/erskine/forms.shtml or contact the Erskine Programmme Office at Erskine@canterbury.ac.nz

Nominations for Erskine Fellowships for 2019 are also being accepted.

Erskine Programme – Visiting Fellow Profile: Guy Holburn from University of Western Ontario, Canada

Where you have come from and what do you teach?

I am a professor at the Ivey Business School, University of Western Ontario in Canada, where I teach business strategy and sustainability courses to undergraduates, graduates and executives. One of the favorite courses I teach, ‘Corporations and Society’, tackles fundamental issues about the evolving role that businesses play in modern society. I am also the Director of the Ivey Energy Policy and Management Centre, and much of my research focuses on the energy sector, which is a significant part of the Canadian economy.

What interested you in the Erskine Programme/Why did you want to come to UC?

One of my professors at Berkeley was David Teece, who is a UC alumnus, so I had heard a lot of positive things from him about New Zealand and Christchurch. Although he lives mainly in California, he still maintains strong connections with New Zealand and UC, and his accent is still unmistakably Kiwi. I actually learnt about the Erskine Programme from a faculty member in the science department at my university who had had an Erskine position several years ago, and he couldn’t praise it highly enough. The Business School at UC has world-class faculty in sustainability and management, so the prospect of visiting for an extended period was extremely appealing.


Guy with two of his children, Alexander and Georgina, enjoying the natural beauty of Riccarton Bush

What have you been doing at UC?

I am co-teaching undergraduate and MBA courses on business sustainability topics along with my host, Professor Michaela Balzarova. We each bring our own perspectives to the material (mine being economics), so the courses are a real fusion of expertise. We are having fun teaching the classes together and I think (hope) the students are benefiting from our individual approaches and contributions.

I am also developing a joint paper on solar power in New Zealand, and am finishing up several papers on energy regulation. There are a lot of academic seminars and lectures happening around campus so I’ve taken the opportunity to explore outside my own discipline – the debate on “Tyranny and Crises of Democracy: What we can learn from Antiquity”, chaired by Peter Field, Dean of Arts, and the lecture by Dame Carol Robinson on “What’s Really Inside your Medicine Cabinet?” were both excellent events with high quality speakers.

What have you most enjoyed about your time here at UC/Christchurch?


It’s hard to know where to begin. Hanging out on Friday afternoons at the staff club – one of the most charming and congenial university clubs I have visited – chatting with other staff and Erskine visitors. Meeting so many welcoming new people on and off campus. Exploring Christchurch and the surrounding area with the family at weekends – the botanical gardens, Canterbury museum, Rollicking Gelato, Sumner beach, fireworks at Hagley Park, Akaroa. We have also enjoyed a day trip picnicking at Castle Hill and wading through Cave Spring. A highlight so far has been driving over the mountains and trekking in the rain up to Franz Joseph Glacier (though I think the kids would have preferred the Margaret Mahy playground). The kids are enjoying their time at school where they have been welcomed by students and teachers.

I have to thank the Erksine Program staff and my faculty host, Professor Balzarova, for being exceptionally helpful and hospitable, and making the transition to UC and Christchurch as smooth as possible. This has played a large part in making the experience so rewarding and enjoyable.

Erskine Programme – Cambridge/Canterbury Academic Exchange Scheme now open

The Erskine Programme Office is pleased to announce that the Cambridge/Canterbury Academic Exchange Scheme is now open.

The Cambridge/Canterbury Academic Exchange Scheme for 2019 visits consists of:

– Cambridge Fellowships: open to applicants for visits to all Colleges for academics from the University of Cambridge, UK who want to come to UC; and

– Cambridge Grants: open to applicants from all Colleges for UC academics who want to go to the University of Cambridge, UK.

Further information and application forms can be found at https://intranet.canterbury.ac.nz/erskine/forms.shtml

In addition to this Scheme the Erskine Programme Office is also accepting nominations for Oxford/Canterbury Fellowships and Grants and Canterbury Fellowships and Grants. The closing date for applications is 11 May 2018.

Applications for Erskine Fellowships and Grants can be received at any time.

If you have any questions please contact the Erskine Programme Manager (Joanne Noble-Nesbitt) at joanne.noble-nesbitt@canterbury.ac.nz or call 93984.

Erskine Programme: Visiting Fellow Profile – William Allan from Oxford University, UK (Oxford Visiting Fellow)

Where you have come from and what do you teach?
I work at University College, Oxford, where I teach Greek and Latin languages and literature. My teaching spans a wide range of Classical literature, from Homer in the late eighth century BC down to Tacitus in the second century AD, so there’s a nice variety to it. My particular research area is early Greek poetry, especially tragedy and epic, but I enjoy being able to teach Latin as well as Greek and later authors as well as early ones.

What interested you in the Erskine Programme/why did you want to come to UC?
The Erskine Programme is a great opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with fellow classicists at UC and to teach in a different setting. I first became aware of the strong Classics community in New Zealand at a conference about ten years ago, and have been keen to return ever since. My research interests overlap with the UC Head of Department, Dr Patrick O’Sullivan, which made an exchange here attractive. I hadn’t had the chance to visit the South Island before, and the city of Christchurch and its beautiful setting were also a factor in wanting to come here.

What have you been doing at UC?
I’ve taught a six-week course on Greek tragedy at the summer school, which was really enjoyable. Since my Oxford teaching is mainly tutorials (usually with two students at a time), it was nice to engage with a larger group (around twenty students), since the seminar format allowed for more group discussion and feedback. I’m also giving a research talk in the Department on the Athenian statesman and poet Solon, and am taking part in a roundtable discussion with colleagues from Classics and History on ‘Tyranny and Crises of Democracy: Lessons from Antiquity’. My wife is a classicist too and she’s giving a public lecture at the Arts Centre on the ancient Greek poet Sappho.

What have you most enjoyed about your time here at UC/Christchurch?
It’s hard to know where to begin. Spending time with UC Classics colleagues and the Arts Centre staff has been wonderful, and everyone has been extremely welcoming. I’ve enjoyed teaching in the Arts Centre and seeing the Teece Museum, and the students on my course have been a lot of fun. It’s also fascinating to be in a city that’s changing and regenerating. Our three-year-old daughter has enjoyed being able to go to the beach at weekends and we’ve found the city perfect for young families. She’s even starting to pick up a Kiwi accent from her time at the University’s Early Learning Centre. My wife and I have loved being able to walk in the Port Hills after classes – a great change from flat Oxford. All in all, it’s been a brilliant three months and I’m really grateful to my host, Patrick O’Sullivan, for helping me to arrange the visit and for making us feel so welcome here, and to the Erskine Programme staff for all their kind support.

Erskine Programme: Academic Exchange Programmes for 2019 visits now open

The Erskine Programme Office is pleased to announce that the following academic exchange schemes for visits in 2019 are now open:

– Canterbury Fellowships: open to applicants from the College of Arts (except Linguistics and Philosophy), the College of Education, Health and Human Development (expect Health Sciences) and the School of Law for academics wanting to come to UC;

– Canterbury Grants: open to applicants from the College of Arts (except Linguistics and Philosophy), the College of Education, Health and Human Development (expect Health Sciences) and the School of Law for academics wanting to go overseas;

– Oxford Fellowships: open to applicants for visits to all Colleges for academics from the University of Oxford, UK who want to come to UC; and

– Oxford Grants: open to applicants from all Colleges for UC academics who want to go to the University of Oxford, UK.

Further information and application forms can be found at https://intranet.canterbury.ac.nz/erskine/forms.shtml

The closing date for applications is 11 May 2018.

Nominations for the Cambridge/Canterbury academic exchange are not yet open. A further update will be provided once this exchange programme opens. Applications for Erskine Fellowship and Grants can be received at any time.

If you have any questions please contact the Erskine Programme Manager (Joanne Noble-Nesbitt) at joanne.noble-nesbitt@canterbury.ac.nz or call 93984.