All posts by Tom

Associate Professor of Economics, UC Business School

Global awareness and the Gallup World Poll

Global awareness is one of UC’s graduate attributes ,and just one way you can become more globally aware is to take a look at the Gallup World Poll as it allows you to see how well Aotearoa New Zealand does relative to other countries on a wide variety of indicators.

Some examples of such comparison can be found in Associate Professor Tom Coupe’s latest column for interest.co.nz, here. 

In the column, Professor Coupe discusses  Aotearoa New Zealand’s performance in terms of housing affordability, public transportation infrastructure, gender relations, satisfaction with education, life and government.

For all this and more, check out the Gallup World Poll Database.

Workshop on Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research  

There is more and more evidence that findings from many scientific studies cannot be reproduced, casting doubt on the reliability of these studies. 

On October 26, 2018,  at the ‘Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research’ workshop,  we will discuss the extent of this replication crisis, explore various methods that can be used to check whether a study can be replicated, and present tools that can be used to make one’s own research more reproducible and trustworthy.

  • Date: Friday 26 October, 9:00am – 17:00pm
  • Place: UC Business School, Meremere, Room 236
  • Registration (important for catering purposes): email tom.coupe@canterbury.ac.nz

 Speakers and titles of the presentations

[you can find abstracts here]

  • Anton Angelo (UC Library): Transparency and reproducibility – It’s all about layers.
  • Arin Basu (UC Health Sciences): What about Why?
  • Annette N. Brown (FHI 360, Chief Science Office): Which tests not witch hunts: A diagnostic approach to conducting replication research
  • Brian Haig (UC Psychology): Understanding replication in a way that is true to science.
  • Jeff Miller (University of Otago, Psychology): The statistical fundamentals of (non)-replicability
  • Thomas Pfeiffer (Massey University, Computational Biology/Biochemistry): Betting on your peers’ results: A tale of three markets
  • Robert Reed (UC Business School): An update on the progress of replications in economics
  • Philip Schluter (UC Health Sciences): A Bayesian alternative to hypothesis testing
  • Eric Vanman (University of Queensland, Psychology). How pre-registrations can improve science: Tales from the front-line
  • Ben Wood (Integra LLC): Lessons learned from running a social science replication program

PROGRAM

Time Activity
9:00-9:30 Registration
9:30-9:35 Introduction
9:35-11:05 SESSION: Replication – Theory and Current Status
11:05-11:30 Coffee Break
11:30-12:30 SESSION: How to Detect the Truth
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-15:00 SESSION: Making Research More Reproducible
15:00-15:30 Coffee Break
15:30-16:30 SESSION: Observations from the Front Lines
16:30-17:00 Closing

More information on the replication crisis can be found on the Replication Network Website

This workshop is supported by the University of Canterbury Business School Research Committee.

So you are looking for data?

Here are some sources at the UC library and from the internet that can inspire you, if you’re looking for data.

Being able to analyse data is an important skill. So the chance is high that at some point in your academic career you will be asked to analyse or find interesting data. 

If you are in that situation and you need data for one of your courses or just you need some inspiration for an interesting research assignment, then check out the new Library guide with lots of links to interesting data-sets.

Here are some examples of what is included:

  • If you are looking for data on economic, environmental, health, political or sociological topics, you can find millions of data points in the Gallup World Poll or the Pew data-sets. 
  • For financial data of companies worldwide, you can dive into the Bloomberg terminals or visit the Orbis database.
  • If you are interested in NZ statistics, you can get access to NZ Stats’ Integrated Data Infrastructure (a room with dedicated computer is now available at the UC business school).
  • And the official statistics of almost all countries can be found in the World Bank’s data archive .

Check the whole list of what is available, here.

UC Workshop on Integrity in Scientific Research

With the support of the UC Business School Research Committee, we are organizing an interdisciplinary workshop on integrity in scientific research, tentatively scheduled for Friday 26 October.

Issues to be covered include:
• (Non)-reproducibility of research/replications
• Plagiarism/fake research results/retractions of papers
• (Lack of) data sharing/transparency/open data
• Data privacy
• Methods to analyse scientific integrity including meta-analysis/systematic reviews
• Open science
• Alternatives to Null Hypothesis Statistical Testing
• Tools available for reproducible research

If you are interested in presenting at this workshop or would simply like to attend, please contact tom.coupe@canterbury.ac.nz

We plan to invite some scholars from other institutions in New Zealand – suggestions for speakers are most welcome too!

Arindam Basu (UC School of Health Sciences)
Tom Coupe (UC Business School)
Brian Haig (UC Department of Psychology)
Bob Reed (UC Business School)

Discover the World with the Gallup World Poll – a first for UC and university’s in New Zealand

Thanks to the generous support of the University of Canterbury Foundation, students and staff now have access to the Gallup World Poll!

Only a few universities in the world have access to this data. UC  is the first university in New Zealand to give this opportunity to its staff and students. 

Gallup’s World Poll continually surveys residents in more than 150 countries, representing more than 99% of the world’s adult population, using randomly selected, nationally representative samples.

  • Gallup typically surveys 1,000 individuals in each country, using a standard set of core questions that has been translated into the major languages of the respective country.
  • Questions cover a wide range of issues including work, law and order, social issues, ethics, well-being etc.
  • Data are yearly and available since 2006. Because of its worldwide coverage, the Gallup World Poll provides a unique opportunity to put the New Zealand opinion into an international perspective and stimulate global awareness.

Did you know  that in 2013, 66% of New Zealand respondents who were employed indicated they considered their job to be the ideal job for them (compared to 80% of German respondents)? Or that in 2017, 90% of New Zealand respondents indicated the area they live in is a good place to live for racial/ethnic minorities (compared to 42% of Chinese respondents)?

Added value

In addition to the Gallup Analytics portal which provides access to the aggregated results of these polls, staff and students can also obtain respondent level data from the Gallup World Poll via the Business and Economics Subject Librarian, Janette Nicolle. Given there are about 1000 respondents per country, for over 100 countries in the world and for most years since 2006, this is a great source of data for both research and teaching!

If you would like to know more details about this dataset or discuss possible uses of the data, please feel free to contact Business and Economics Subject Librarian, Janette Nicolle or Associate Professor Tom Coupe who has experience working with this database.