Category Archives: Campus Transformation

Power outage – Foundry – Monday 19 March 2018

As a consequence of needing to connect the Foundry building power supply to  a new substation, this building will be without power for most of the day.

Outage Period –    Monday 19th March, from   8am – 4.30pm
The building affected with a total power and data outage is:

  • The Foundry – including Bentley’s

Staff are advised that for the affected buildings with a power outage there will be NO ACCESS as the buildings will be locked down for the period of the outage.

It is recommended that building occupants turn off their computers and area printers last thing before leaving work on the afternoon before the outage.

Please forward this advice to any affected staff and student building users as appropriate.

Should you have any queries please do not hesitate to contact me.

Rob Oudshoorn
Group Manager Engineering
Engineering Services
Int ext – 95498
Ph – (03)3695498
Mob – 0274364161

Closure of C Block Lecture Theatres – mid semester break

Due to upcoming hard demolition works on the old von Haast building, C-Block Lecture Theatres will be closed from Friday 30 March to Sunday 22 April, a period which includes both Easter and the mid-semester break.

As such, no bookings for any space within this block will be accepted during this period.

As previously advised, hard demolition will commence during the first week of March and continue through until the end of April.

For more information

Old von Haast – Demolition Update

Hard demolition of the old Von Haast building will commence the first week of March and continue through to the end of April. It is expected that noise will peak in mid-March and mid-April with the removal of the foundation slabs and the back filling of these spaces.

A protective walkway is being built between the demolition site, the School of Biological Sciences and the Central Lecture Theatres. Please note that during this demolition phase the pathways around the demolition may change due to temporary closures and/or spotters may be put in place. Please obey any signage or instructions given by the spotters. These are in place to keep everyone safe.

If you are having any issues working due to noise levels, please consult the Health and Safety options for managing Noise at Work and/or talk to your line manager about possible alternative options.

Any concerns should be addressed to the Project Managers Mark Homewood or Mary Watson.


Official Ernest Rutherford building opening

The Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has officially opened the new Ernest Rutherford building.

Stage 1 of the $220 million Rutherford Regional Science and Innovation Centre (RRSIC), the Ernest Rutherford building  was opened with fanfare and fireworks, in front of hundreds of invited guests, including Professor Mary Fowler, great-granddaughter of Lord Rutherford, UC’s famous alumnus. Professor Fowler, a geophysicist, has been Master of Darwin College, Cambridge, UK, since October 2012, and was guest of honour. 

See below for a gallery of photos. (Check out volcanologist Ben Kennedy’s volcano hat!)

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RRSIC Stage 2 is named for UC Alumna Beatrice Tinsley

Beatrice Tinsley is one of the most creative and significant theoreticians in modern astronomy.

Known as “Queen of the Cosmos” Beatrice Tinsley’s work has had a profound influence on what scientists know about stars, the galaxy and the Universe itself.

Deciding by the age of 14 that she wanted to be an astrophysicist, she graduated from UC with an MSc in Physics with First Class Honours in 1961. She then completed her PhD on the evolution of universes at the University of Texas in just two years, receiving marks of 99% and 100%.

In 1974, she left Texas for a one year fellowship at the Lick Observatory of the University of California, before gaining an assistant professorship at Yale University. She became Professor of Astronomy at Yale in 1978, the same year she was diagnosed with melanoma.

She continued to publish until shortly before her death in 1981, producing over 100 scientific papers in her short 14 year academic career. She received a number of honours and accolades for her work. In 1986 the American Astronomical Society established the Beatrice M Tinsley Prize for outstanding creative contributions to astronomy or astrophysics and the University of Texas created a visiting professorship in astronomy in her honour.

The immense importance of her work was finally recognised in New Zealand in 2001 when the New Zealand Geographic Board named a mountain in her honour. Mt Tinsley stands at a proud 1,537 metres in the Kepler Mountains of Fiordland, 15 kilometres west of Te Anau.

Stage 2 of the Rutherford Regional Science and Innovation Centre (RRISC), the building that will replace von Haast (currently being demolished), will be named for Beatrice Tinsley.

Learn more about Beatrice Tinsley’s life and work.