Category Archives: Māori

First Nations’ Futures Programme Scholarships Open Now!

The First Nations’ Futures Programme provides an unique opportunity for aspiring Ngāi Tahu leaders and other Māori postgraduate students to gain access to leading international research and thinking within a specifically indigenous context.

The First Nations’ Futures Programme is held at Stanford University for two weeks in October/November.

Stanford University Grounds

Applications are also invited from Ngāi Tahu and other Māori undergraduate students who are close to completion of their degree and who intend to apply for postgraduate study in 2019-2020.

The closing date for expressions of interest is 31 May, 2019.

Submitting your application:

  1. Download the 2019 FNFP Application Form and Guidelines from the website here>
  2. Email the completed application form with a copy of your CV and relevant supporting documentation to: kirsty.ameriks@canterbury.ac.nz and cc ntrc@canterbury.ac.nz
  3. Applications must be received by Friday 31 May 2019

For more information refer to the website or email ntrc@canterbury.ac.nz

An inclusive, safe and welcoming culture. Whiria te Taura Tangata #15

Kia ora koutou

I’ve been thinking a lot about inclusiveness over the last few months and the events of the 15 March have increased my desire to support UC as a welcoming and inclusive community.  This means our working and learning culture is one where we all feel safe, respected and comfortable to be ourselves. A place where we can share our sense of belonging.

From an Organisational Culture perspective, three of the constructive (blue) cluster of styles directly talk to this:

  • Self-Actualising: people should feel comfortable to be themselves at work,
  • Humanistic-Encouraging: people are expected to be supportive of each other, and
  • Affiliative: people are encouraged to place a high priority on constructive interpersonal relationships and to be friendly, open and sensitive to the needs of others.

There are many opportunities for us to continue building UC into an inclusive environment. Here are some links I know of:

I know there are lots of people doing heaps of great work in this space so feel free to add a comment about initiatives you are involved in or aware of.

Support – take care of yourself and others

  • Self-care events to be held at the end of April – look out for the special events we’ll be promoting very soon
  • Staff Support
  • Student Support

Find out more

Ngā manaakitanga (with best wishes), 

Karen Mather
Organisational Development Manager

 

Ngāi Tūāhuriri and UC formalise longstanding relationship

Ngāi Tūāhuriri and University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha will sign a partnership agreement on Saturday 2 March at Tuahiwi marae to formalise and extend the longstanding relationships between the hapū, including the relationship with Te Rūnanga of Ngāi Tahu, and the University of Canterbury |Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha. 

The agreement, which outlines the principles and mechanisms for working together into the future, is consistent with Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its principles. This includes supporting the use of te reo and tikanga Māori at UC, and supporting Ngāi Tūāhuriri and Ngāi Tahu students and aspirations for Ngāi Tahu development in the Canterbury region and beyond.

“Ngāi Tahu takes academic achievement in all disciplines seriously. We are excited about this partnership because it will help contribute to the relevance of the University to the regional economy and to Māori,” Gabrielle Huria, Ngāi Tūāhuriri Representative said.

UC Chancellor | Tumu Kaunihera Sue McCormack said: “This is a journey UC began a long time ago in developing a greater understanding of cultural inclusiveness and the principles of the Te Tiriti o Waitangi in action.”

Professional development – putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga

John Kapa, Kapoipoi, Student Development Advisor Māori  explains the significance of putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga, including an opportunity for professional development. 

Putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga – Wednesday 14 November, 1.30pm-3.30pm

This is a workshop co-ordinated by the Professional Learning Community of in-house trainers.
Places are limited – if you would like to attend, please contact the Learning & Development team requesting an invitation (with the location) to be sent to you.

Relationships are important. The idea of AU (I) is more than being individualistic, rather it is also the strength of connection and working as a collective found in whakawhanAUngatanga. Whakawhanaungatanga is the act of and is the process of establishing links, making connections and relating to the people one meets by identifying in culturally appropriate ways, whakapapa linkages, past heritages, points of engagement, or other relationships.

In a metaphoric sense, Mead (2003) asserts that whanaungatanga reaches beyond actual whakapapa relationships and includes relationships to people who are not kin but who, through shared experiences, feel and act as kin.

Exploring this further, this session looks at your self-identified attributes around whanaungatanga to identify touch points and how this could be applied positively at work with peers or with ākonga (students) for example. This will be undertaken through exercises and pūrakau (stories).

 


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