Category Archives: Research & Innovation

Register for the Waterways Center for Freshwater Management Postgraduate Student Annual Symposium

Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere opening into the Pacific Ocean. Credit: Katie Colucio

Thinking about researching freshwater management issues, or supervising promising students who want to do the same? Brought to you by the Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management, postgraduate students from the University of Canterbury and Lincoln University are showcasing their research from a wide range of disciplines. This includes the extent of micro-plastic contamination within the Avon/Ōtakaro river or the impact of climate change on water resources in Cambodia. You can also find out about ‘who is eating who’ in South Island alpine tarns or the effects of off-road vehicles on the shores of Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora. Attendance is free and the day is fully catered!

When: Tuesday 19 November, 9-5pm

Where: Lincoln University, Stewart Building.

Registration closes 5 November and can be done here.

Geospatial Research Seminar Series – Dr Kat Salm presents on “Women in Spatial”

Dr Kat Salm has been working in the spatial industry in New Zealand across government, industry, and research/education for a number of years. She is also the winner of the 2018 New Zealand Spatial Excellence Awards (NZSEA) in the category “Women’s Leadership Award”, as well as the 2019 Asia-Pacific Spatial Excellence Awards (APSEA).

In this ‘talk of two halves’, Kat will share information on a couple of her focus areas.

  • The first of these is around the current state of Women in Spatial in New Zealand. Kat will present the outcomes of the latest survey of women in the industry and talk about some of the key findings.
  • The second will provide an overview of FrontierSI, a not-for-profit company that exists to deliver major benefits to governments, industry and the community in Australia and New Zealand. Kat will highlight some of the key priority research areas in their programme.

Date: 25 October 2019
Time: 12:30 pm – 2 pm including light lunch
Location: University of Canterbury, Ernest Rutherford Building 263
Host: Geospatial Research Institute

Please sign up via the Eventbrite link so that we can accommodate for catering.
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gri-seminar-25-october-2019-women-in-spatial-and-frontiersi-tickets-75260021751

 

Innovation Jumpstart workshop – Intellectual Property

When: Wednesday 2 October, 11.30am-1.00pm
Where: Forestry building, F1 lecture theatre

Michael Brown, principal at intellectual property law firm AJ Park, will present a one hour session on intellectual property (IP).  The session will introduce and discuss the different types of IP, explain how IP can be used to achieve commercial success, and cover important points to optimise protection. Questions will be welcomed.

Michael joined AJ Park in 1998 and currently co-heads the engineering and ICT patents team. His role involves advising clients on patentability, design registration and product commercialisation. He prepares and prosecutes patent applications, both in New Zealand and abroad and also regularly conducts infringement and freedom-to-operate assessments, patent portfolio due diligence, and IP audits.

A light lunch will be available from 11:30am, and Michael’s talk will begin at midday.

Please RSVP to adrian.busch@canterbury.ac.nz

UC engineers excel in MBIE Endeavour Funding

Three UC engineers have been awarded research funding totalling $11.8 million for the next 3-5 years in the latest round of Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment Endeavour Funding, announced by Hon Dr Megan Woods today. 

Professors Conan Fee, Shusheng Pang and Mathieu Sellier received funding for research they are leading in the areas of renewable energy and advanced manufacturing. 

See the UC news story here>
Read more about the announcement here>

Professor Conan Fee, School of Product Design, UC Engineering – 3D printed porous media for process engineering ($9,812,550 funded over five years)

This research project will revolutionise manufacturing processes that have only changed incrementally over the last two centuries. Using advances in 3D print technologies, the research programme will develop ways to create structures of complex solid and fluid channel geometric design to deliver heat and mass exchange more efficiently. Work to date shows that 3D-printed triply periodic minimal surfaces (3D-TPMS) offer significant advantages over existing heat exchanger and porous bed designs, but the knowledge gap between engineering science and computational tools required for the design of 3D-printed structures is preventing implementation in real-world applications, which the research programme will address.

Professor Shusheng Pang, Chemical and Process Engineering – Integrated chemical looping and oxygen uncoupling with advanced biomass gasification, for renewable hydrogen production and carbon dioxide capture ($999,999 funded over three years)

This research will develop a new system that combines advanced technology of biomass steam gasification with the capability of Hot Lime Labs for developing new carbon dioxide sorbents and oxygen carrier materials. This research will develop a new process and materials to produce bio-hydrogen and capture carbon dioxide by using New Zealand wood biomass resources from log harvesting and wood processing. The bio-hydrogen produced could be used as transport fuel, a chemical feedstock for methanol, ammonia and oil refineries. At present 95 per cent of hydrogen used in these industries is produced from fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide captured from this process could be used in plant greenhouses, fertiliser manufacturing and methanol or ethanol production.   

Professor Mathieu Sellier, Mechanical Engineering – Development of a multi-axis spin-coating system to coat curved surfaces ($1,000,000 funded over three years)

By developing a system with the capability to spin-coat curved surfaces product developers will have more flexibility in the shapes they can produce. Traditionally, spin coating is achieved by depositing a liquid on the surface and then spinning it off to leave a thin film that will solidify. Non-uniformity of liquid distribution is the biggest challenge to spin-coating curved surfaces. For the first time, Professor Sellier’s Smart Idea will develop optimal flow control algorithms using the theory of Partial Differential Equation and a multi-axis system to achieve uniform distribution of liquid onto a curved surface which will revolutionise the possibilities of product development.

Come and support our colleague: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution made by Professor Clemency Montelle and Professor Geoffrey Rodgers in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date                Thursday 3 October, from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Venue             E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend these lectures, to actively support our new professors, and to take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Extraordinary scientific exchanges between Europe and India in the 18th century

Presented by Professor Clemency Montelle

International collaboration makes for fruitful innovation, and historical studies show this isn’t just a modern phenomenon.  In November 1730, a young Portuguese astronomer named Pedro Da Silva travelled to India, bringing with him a copy of the 1727 reprint of Philippe de La Hire’s Tabulae astronomicae. Working in the court of Jayasiṃha, Emperor of Jaipur, in the subsequent years, da Silva and other Jesuit priests collaborated alongside Indian astronomers to produce versions of this work in Sanskrit.   I explore this fascinating case of transmission by comparing passages from the 1727 reprint in Latin and the subsequent Sanskrit translations and some of the surprising consequences of introducing new science to a contrasting culture of inquiry.

Research into earthquake engineering and hip replacement implants

Presented by Professor Geoffrey Rodgers

This talk will cover the closely related, yet seemingly disparate fields of earthquake engineering and biomedical engineering. Perhaps surprisingly, the finer details of research in both these fields can require a closely similar skill-set, despite the vastly different fields of application.

This talk will first cover recent research into novel energy dissipation and seismic damping devices, and their application to low-damage structures to improve the resilience of built environment. Implementation of these new structural design methods and devices, both locally within the Christchurch Rebuild, and internationally, will be covered.

This talk will also cover the use of ultrasonic sensors, video motion capture, and human gait analysis, to better understand the mechanics of hip replacement implants within the human body. This increased understanding of the in-service implant mechanics will help to design additional methods to diagnose impending Dysfunction of Osteo-Mechanics (DOOM) and potentially improve hip replacement implant designs.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Professor Ian Wright, Deputy Vice-Chancellor