Category Archives: Research & Innovation

ERSKINE PROGRAMME GRANT PROFILE – ANNICK MASSELOT

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Annick Masselot in Cambridge

What Department/School have you come from and what do you teach?
I come from the School of Law. I teach Employment Law and Advanced Employment Law, Contract Law, Gender and the Law, European Union Law and Legal Research Methods.  I also do some teaching in the Executive Development Programme where I teach Business Law for the MBA and the MBM degrees.

What interested you in the Grant opportunity?
One of my present line of research is concerned with the gender impact of Brexit. People wrongly think that Brexit and, what are considered to be the most relevant issues: Trade and migration, are gender neutral topics.  In reality, the most adversely impacted people are likely to be the least visible people: women and people from minority backgrounds.

The Cambridge Grant provided me with the opportunity to be based and do research in the United Kingdom at a time when political and legal developments around this theme were at their peak. The Grant further offered me the opportunity to be at Cambridge University where I could interact with experts in the field of constitutional and European Union law and political as well as gender studies scholars. As Cambridge is central to the UK, I knew I was also going to be able to do research in London, in particular at the British Parliament. I was also able to work with NGO and think tanks.

Being in the UK also provided a chance for me to disseminate my work in the country and also in other European Countries.

The grant is generous enough that I was able to do research without  worrying about where to live and I could take my family with me, which was a real bonus.

Where did you visit (i.e which institutions)?
I was a recipient of the Cambridge Grant so I spent most of my time at Cambridge University, where I was based in the Centre for European Legal Studies in the Faculty of Law.  During my time at Cambridge, I was also invited to deliver talks in other institutions.

  • ‘Gendertrouble while approaching the cliff edge Brexit?’ Queen’s University Belfast, The Centre for European and Transnational Studies, Belfast, 7 October 2019
  • ‘Jacinda Ardern and the development of a model of feminist foreign policy?’ feminist foreign policy in the EU context, Quaker Council for European Affairs, Brussels, 26 September 2019
  • ‘The gender impact of Brexit – Unpacking the ideology of socio-political institutions’, School of Law, Reading University, 16 October 2019 (with Roberta Guerrina UoBristol).

How will your time overseas benefit your teaching at UC?
The Cambridge Grant is mostly a research grant, as such it does not really consider teaching. However, I was also invited as a guest lecturer in the Jean Monnet Summer School on Gender and Brexit: Processes and Strategies for Gender Mainstreaming in the Process of Exiting the EU, University of Surrey (UK), 3-8 July 2019.

I delivered two lectures to a range of students and practitioners on (1) EU as a Gender Actor from Internal to External Affairs and (2) Gendering External Affairs – How is Trade gendered?

This experience together with the ability to share experience on European Union practices and on Brexit with practitioners provides unique experience which can be translated into vivid lectures at the University of Canterbury. Having first hand expertise in a topic makes us better teacher because we know what is going on on the ground.  

 Do you have any advice for potential future Grant applicants?
Don’t be shy, go forth and meet people outside UC.

 

Citation advantage for open access at UC

The scholarly publishing market is changing rapidly. The UC Library and R&I has been assessing the potential impact of developments such as Plan S on UC researchers to identify how we can prepare to meet them.

We investigated the rate of citation for articles produced by UC researchers and founding an overall citation advantage for research in open access publications. Specifically, we found that articles deposited in the UC Research Repository were cited 129% more often, on average, than articles only available behind a paywall (a.k.a. ‘closed access’).

Getting your work into the UC Research Repository is straight-forward:

  1. In Elements, upload the manuscript accepted by the publisher (and any other versions that you have).
  2. Select “Accepted version” and click deposit.

UC Library staff will double-check copyright compliance before uploading the correct version into the UC Research Repository. If you have questions or would like support with this process, get in touch with your subject librarian.

Making your work open access doesn’t have to involve costly article processing charges. Publish anywhere, deposit here.

Innovation Jumpstart workshop – Intellectual Property

When: Wednesday 6 November, 3.00pm to 4.00pm
Where: John Britten foyer

Michael Brown, Principal at intellectual property law firm AJ Park, will present a one hour session on intellectual property (IP).  The session will introduce and discuss the different types of IP, explain how IP can be used to achieve commercial success, and cover important points to optimise IP protection. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions.

Michael joined AJ Park in 1998 and currently co-heads the engineering and ICT patents team. His role involves advising clients on patentability, design registration and product commercialisation. He prepares and prosecutes patent applications, both in New Zealand and abroad and also regularly conducts infringement and freedom-to-operate assessments, patent portfolio due diligence, and IP audits.

Register for the Waterways Center for Freshwater Management Postgraduate Student Annual Symposium

Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere opening into the Pacific Ocean. Credit: Katie Colucio

Thinking about researching freshwater management issues, or supervising promising students who want to do the same? Brought to you by the Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management, postgraduate students from the University of Canterbury and Lincoln University are showcasing their research from a wide range of disciplines. This includes the extent of micro-plastic contamination within the Avon/Ōtakaro river or the impact of climate change on water resources in Cambodia. You can also find out about ‘who is eating who’ in South Island alpine tarns or the effects of off-road vehicles on the shores of Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora. Attendance is free and the day is fully catered!

When: Tuesday 19 November, 9-5pm

Where: Lincoln University, Stewart Building.

Registration closes 5 November and can be done here.