Closed walkway around Ernest Rutherford

The walkway between the Ernest Rutherford building and the new Beatrice Tinsley building will be closed from 24 August to 8 September.

You will still be able to walk through Ernest Rutherford building and across the bridge to the Engineering Core. The closure is to allow for asphalt work to take place. Please take care in the area during this time, follow any directional signage and stay outside the fenced off area.

Celebrating Fresh Thinking – Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Mathieu Sellier and Professor Greg O’Beirne in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date :    Thursday, 5 September, from 4.30 – 6.30pm

Venue: E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

‘Moving the boundaries of fluid mechanics’  – Presented by Professor Mathieu Sellier

Abstract: Many flows encountered in our daily lives involve a moving boundary. The shape of a raindrop, for example, evolves as it falls through the air. Likewise, the free surface of a river deforms as it encounters obstacles. While the mathematical ingredients required to describe such flows have been known since the late 19th century and are encapsulated in the infamous Navier-Stokes equations, solving complex flows with a moving boundary or interface still poses significant challenges and provides stimulating cross-disciplinary research opportunities. The question at the centre of the research I will present is “if information about the evolution of a moving interface is available, can we indirectly infer unknown properties of the flow?” Such a question falls in the realm of inverse problems for which one knows the effect but is looking for the cause. Specifically, I will talk about how it is possible to estimate the fluid properties of lava just by looking at how it flows or what is the best way to rotate a pan to cook the perfect crêpe.

‘Speech, noise, and the Matrix’ – Presented by Professor Greg A. O’Beirne

People with hearing impairment or auditory processing problems find it harder than most to understand speech in background noise, or when parts of the speech signal are missing or distorted. Despite this, most hearing tests still present either pure tones or single words in quiet, and usually use expensive equipment to do it. 

To overcome these shortcomings and better assess the ability to communicate in challenging acoustic environments, my lab has produced a number of innovative adaptive tests of speech intelligibility and auditory processing. These include i) the UCAST-FW – a filtered word test for the diagnosis of auditory processing disorder; ii) internet-based Digit Triplet Tests to screen for sensorineural hearing loss in New Zealand English, Te Reo Māori, and Malay; and iii) the University of Canterbury Auditory-Visual Matrix Sentence Test – a speech-in-noise test in New Zealand English and Malay that allows rapid testing of adults and school-age children, including their ability to use visual cues to supplement the auditory signal.

I’ll discuss how permanent hearing impairment reduces speech clarity even when sounds are audible, and how the testing platform we’ve developed provides an integrated set of tools for improving hearing screening and speech testing in New Zealand, Australia, and south-east Asia.

 

Want to see how we celebrated Fairtrade Fortnight on campus?

Last week, UC Sustainability celebrated all things ethical and fair trade with one of our favourite events of the year: our annual Fair Trade Fair! Missed out? Read on, we’ve put together a highlights reel so you can see what we got up to.

 

Held in the beautiful Haere-roa, we welcomed over 200 students and staff to come and learn about fair trade, try some yummy (and fairly traded) goodies, and meet our suppliers who make our Fair Trade University possible. The fair trade cold brew, banana smoothies (made by pedal power on a smoothie bike of course!) and hot chocolates went down an absolute treat, and we loved seeing our suppliers share their stories of the real people and communities behind their products.

What is fair trade, and why should we care?

Fair trade supports marginalised farmers and workers in developing countries. By supporting them, we’re enabling them to take better care of their environment and to build a better life for themselves, their families and their communities. From the coffee you drink, the chocolate you eat and the clothes you wear – products that are fairly traded create a real, positive difference in people’s lives. By choosing to buy fair trade, we are guaranteeing producers receive a minimum price regardless of global trends. We’re also ensuring that workers receive liveable wages, safe working conditions, access to clean water and schooling for their children.

Our University has been proudly Fair Trade since 2017. To learn more about who we’re working with to make our University fair trade, and real  examples of what they are doing for their communities, check out the suppliers stories below (and spot them in the photos!)

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope you enjoyed seeing our fair trade celebrations – and we’ll see you again next year!

This message was brought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on FacebookInstagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This is part of our contribution to Fairtrade Fortnight, where we encourage our UC community to get involved and support the empowerment of producers overseas. If you’d like some more information on our Fair Trade University, see our website. Big thanks to Corey Blackburn and Mark McNeill from UC Marketing for the photos and videos of the event.

Student First Programme Creates One-Stop-Shop of Resources For Stakeholders

Student First Programme Communications Advisor, Nicki Tipa was excited to launch the programme’s new intranet site at the July Community Update. The Student First Programme team creates a wealth of resources for its stakeholders, including user guides, news articles and videos, but without a place to house them, they go underutilised. The main driver for the new site was to give the programme’s stakeholders increased access to resources and the ability to easily share these with their teams.

Student First Intranet - link

The Student First Programme Intranet is visible only to UC staff, so when you first visit you’ll need to set up your login details. Here’s some quick instructions to get you up and running:

  1. Go to Student First Programme Intranet. (We recommend using Chrome.)
  2. You will be sent to a WordPress login page – Enter your UC credentials and check the ‘remember me’ box so the details are saved. Click LOG IN.
  3. You should now see the SFP home page, bookmark this for future reference.

The site is still a work in progress and the team welcomes your feedback. Simply email studentfirstprogramme@canterbury.ac.nz.

Student First Programme’s Process Manager, Tim Hatherley-Green, updated the Community Group on upcoming releases for the remainder of 2019 where the Programme will continue to focus on building more functionality into ourUC (the replacement for Jade), where staff will do their work in the future.

Rachel Montejo, Student First Programme Project Manager – Academic, announced the Programme’s trial of a new Skype Hotline to provide additional support for UC staff helping students during the busy mid-year enrolment period.

See the highlights of the July community update here (14 mins):

July Community Update Video

What’s the latest?

Release 14.0 is the latest from the Student First Programme and will provide foundation benefits for 2020 enrolment enhancements.

This release affected a small number of staff in the College of Arts and featured improvements to workflows such as qualifications with automatic approval being ‘turned on’ to enable them to be processed through ourUC. This release also included an exciting update for better application administration with the creation of the first version of the Task Manager where staff will access their tasks in the future.

The greatest benefit of this release is that the successful deployment of the Qualification entry and Task Manager for the College of Arts provides proof these enhancements can be rolled out for other Colleges in the future.

Watch out for more news about our upcoming releases and new features. If you have questions about the Student First Programme ask your manager or contact the team at studentfirstprogramme@canterbury.ac.nz

Are You Ready For The Challenge

The Australasian University Health Challenge is about to kick off on 19 August – today! If you haven’t signed up yet then head on over to website to get your step by step instructions on how to be involved. Join the other 113 other University of Canterbury participants who have said yes to the challenge.

If you still need some more motivation on joining then have a look at our Facebook below. You can have a chance to win a brand new Fitbit Charge 2 worth $269.99.

The challenge is not only just for steps either. You can record other forms of activities such as biking, swimming, or even volleyball. As long as you are physical active you can add it to your daily step count through the online physical activity to steps converter.

Remember keeping consistent and motivated is always better with a friend. Find someone who will keep you accountable and this challenge may change your life.

Keeping UC staff informed