Royal Society of New Zealand 2015 Rutherford Lecture

Going super heavy: the end of the periodic table of elements Wednesday 26 August, 6pm, C1 lecture theatre, University of Canterbury

This year’s Rutherford Lecture will be delivered by Distinguished Professor Peter Schwerdtfeger (Massey University), a leading chemist and physicist who was awarded the Royal Society of New Zealand’s 2014 Rutherford Medal.

The first periodic table of elements, proposed in 1869, was compiled by arranging the elements in ascending order of atomic weight, grouped by chemical properties. At that time, it was not known how high in atomic weight the elements could go before becoming unstable and decaying. The last decade has seen the production of new elements up to nuclear charge 118 – just how heavy can elements go and what can chemists do with such exotic elements? Where does the periodic table end?

The lecture is free and open to the public but, to ensure a seat, you should register online. You can also find more information here.

Wind tunnel removal – Mechanical Engineering Wing

As part of the Mechanical Engineering decant, the low speed wind tunnel will be removed from the wing during the week commencing 3 August 2015. The area occupied by the wind tunnels and the central corridor will become a construction zone during this time as sections of the tunnel are moved across the corridor and into the main workshop.

During this week, there will be no access for staff or students to the wind tunnel area, and the corridor will be blocked. Signage indicating an alternative pedestrian route will be in place.

Any questions or concerns around this work should be addressed to Scott Amies (ext 7237) or Rodney Elliot (ext 7259)

The Structural Engineering Laboratory

If you use Engineering Road, you’ll have noticed a lot of activity behind the hoardings opposite Facilities Management as the new Structural Engineering Laboratory begins to take shape.

Capable of testing full-scale building systems under a variety of load conditions, this facility will put UC at the forefront of earthquake engineering education and research in New Zealand.

Due for completion in February 2016, the laboratory will comprise a 2 metre thick strong floor of 300 square metres total area, and 1.6 metre thick walls that run 9.2 metres high and 28 metres long.

Keeping UC staff informed