Tag Archives: academic

Come and support our colleague: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution made by Professor Clemency Montelle and Professor Geoffrey Rodgers in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date                Thursday 3 October, from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Venue             E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend these lectures, to actively support our new professors, and to take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Extraordinary scientific exchanges between Europe and India in the 18th century

Presented by Professor Clemency Montelle

International collaboration makes for fruitful innovation, and historical studies show this isn’t just a modern phenomenon.  In November 1730, a young Portuguese astronomer named Pedro Da Silva travelled to India, bringing with him a copy of the 1727 reprint of Philippe de La Hire’s Tabulae astronomicae. Working in the court of Jayasiṃha, Emperor of Jaipur, in the subsequent years, da Silva and other Jesuit priests collaborated alongside Indian astronomers to produce versions of this work in Sanskrit.   I explore this fascinating case of transmission by comparing passages from the 1727 reprint in Latin and the subsequent Sanskrit translations and some of the surprising consequences of introducing new science to a contrasting culture of inquiry.

Research into earthquake engineering and hip replacement implants

Presented by Professor Geoffrey Rodgers

This talk will cover the closely related, yet seemingly disparate fields of earthquake engineering and biomedical engineering. Perhaps surprisingly, the finer details of research in both these fields can require a closely similar skill-set, despite the vastly different fields of application.

This talk will first cover recent research into novel energy dissipation and seismic damping devices, and their application to low-damage structures to improve the resilience of built environment. Implementation of these new structural design methods and devices, both locally within the Christchurch Rebuild, and internationally, will be covered.

This talk will also cover the use of ultrasonic sensors, video motion capture, and human gait analysis, to better understand the mechanics of hip replacement implants within the human body. This increased understanding of the in-service implant mechanics will help to design additional methods to diagnose impending Dysfunction of Osteo-Mechanics (DOOM) and potentially improve hip replacement implant designs.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Professor Ian Wright, Deputy Vice-Chancellor

University Community Engagement: Lessons from the US

How can universities use their resources, knowledge, and student skill and passion to address real-world issues and challenges in their communities?

World-wide, academic service-learning and other forms of university-community engagement help students learn academic content, develop civic and professional skills, and apply their knowledge to real-world problems. In this Prestige Lecture, Visiting Canterbury Fellow Dr Paul Matthews (University of Georgia, USA) shares the key components, best practices, and research around academic service-learning, with examples from a range of disciplines and partnerships.

This lecture will be of interest to anyone involved in delivering courses, programmes and activities that encourage and support students’ engagement within their communities.

ALL WELCOME.

When: Tuesday 6 August, 4pm – 6pm
Where: Community Engagement Hub, Rehua 108
Find out more at: www.canterbury.ac.nz/events/active/uc-events/university-community-engagement-lessons-from-the-us.html 

First grant for emerging researcher

Up-and-coming researcher Dr Laurie McLay has received an emerging researcher first grant from the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC) valued at $160,825 over three years.

Dr Laurie McLay emerging researcherDr McLay will use the grant to continue her research on developing effective treatments for sleep problems that affect the growing number of Aotearoa New Zealand children and young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Dr McLay will be working with a team of psychologists, including Associate Professor Karyn France and Professor Neville Blampied, who are also from UC.

Sleep disruptions such as delayed sleep onset and frequent and prolonged night-time awakenings, can have an enormous impact on how children function during the day and within their families. Such sleep problems are associated with poorer physical and mental health and wellbeing (e.g., obesity, diabetes, mood disorders, and substance abuse), quality of life, cognitive functioning, learning, and academic performance.

Dr McLay says that up to 83 percent of children with ASD experience sleep disturbances, and that these are unlikely to abate over time in these children without effective treatment.
Although these sleep problems are complex in origin, she says evidence suggests there is a learned component that requires behavioural solutions.

“There are poorly understood biochemical differences in children with autism, such as irregular melatonin production and secretion, however, pharmacological strategies like melatonin and sedative medications only offer partial solutions. There is a large, treatable behavioural component to the sleep problem that becomes entwined with the parental behaviours that can unintentionally exacerbate it,” says Dr McLay.

Dr McLay is one of 13 researchers to receive emerging researcher first grants valued at a combined total of $3.03 million in the HRC’s 2017 funding round, up from $1.45 million in 2016.. Read more here.

See dates for 2018 applications>