Tag Archives: awards

2019 Vice Chancellor’s General Staff Development Awards – Applications Open

The 2019 Vice-Chancellor’s General Staff Development Awards & the Health, Safety and Wellbeing Awards are now open for applications.

For full details, and the application forms, please refer to the VC General Staff Development Awards page under the Learning and Development intranet, or Health, Safety and Wellbeing Awards page on the Health and Safety Intranet.

Applications close 4 pm, Wednesday 17 July 2019.

For any further queries, please email learningdevelopment@canterbury.ac.nz

Two UC building projects recognised at Architects Awards

UC achieved an almost clean sweep in the Education Building category of the Canterbury New Zealand Institute of Architects Awards last night with two UC projects, Ernest Rutherford and Rehua winning a combined five awards at the event.

In the Education Building category Ernest Rutherford won architecture and interior architecture awards as well as the Resene Colour Award. Rehua also won architecture and interior architecture awards.

The two projects will now be considered for the National New Zealand Institute of Architecture Awards held in Queenstown later this year.

UC’s Programme Director Brian Phillips was on hand to receive the awards along with project architects and was pleased with the result.

“This is an outstanding achievement for everyone involved and acknowledges the thought and consideration that has gone into the campus transformation,” he says.

Brian Phillips and Senior Project Manager Alan Palmer accompanied Jasmax, DJRD Architects, Royal Associates Architects and Athfield Architects Ltd design in collecting the awards at the ceremony held in Christchurch on 6 June.

Winner of UC Early and Emerging Career Researcher Award

I am pleased to announce that Dr Mitja Remus-Emsermann from the School of Biological Sciences is the winner of the UC Early and Emerging Career Researcher Award 2018.

Dr Remus-Emsermann’s research is at the interface of microbiology, ecology and plant sciences. His research goals include understanding how bacterial communities assemble on plant leaves and which factors drive the spatial structure of bacterial communities.

This research has important implications for life sciences generally, and the agricultural sector in particular. Understanding how bacterial communities are spatially structured will result in critical information for future approaches to select natural plant leaf colonising bacteria that are able to prevent plant pathogen colonisation and disease outbreaks in agricultural environments.

Dr Remus-Emsermann is already a recognised expert in this field and a regular reviewer for high impact journals. He has an outstanding record of publication, especially so given he obtained his doctorate in early 2012. He was appointed a lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences in May 2016, and an Associate Investigator at UC’s Biomolecular Interaction Centre in January 2017.

Please join me in congratulating Dr Remus-Emsermann on his latest achievement and success. 

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

 

Vice-Chancellor & Health, Safety and Wellbeing Award Winners 2018

2018 Vice-Chancellor General Staff Development Awards

Alongside Paul O’Flaherty, Executive Director HR | Kaihautū Matua Pūmanawa Tangata, Dr Rod Carr, Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae  presented awards to the following recipients at the ceremony on 30 August 2018:

  • Rebecca Hurrell
  • Rebecca Warr and Pamela Glover
  • Naomi Wilde
  • Catherine Woods
  • Jace Carson (who was unable to attend)

Held annually, the awards are a chance for our General Staff to be recognised and rewarded for seeking out exceptional professional development opportunities, such as: visits to other higher educational institutions, staff exchanges, specialised training, conferences and more.

Health, Safety & Wellbeing Awards 2018

Dr Rod Carr, Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae, presented alongside Steve Hunter, Health and Safety Manager, awards to the following recipients at the awards on 30 August 2018:

  • Mary Watson
  • Library H&S Group (Mushtak Dawood accepted on behalf)
  • Michael Sandridge
  • Charmaine Atherfold, Julie Stafford and Dave MacPherson

The Awards are designed to reward and encourage staff members to initiate innovative Health & Safety practices within their Department/Unit/College.

Congratulations to all of our winners 

New Zealand Geotechnical Society Geomechanics Award

Congratulations to Chris McGann for recently being awarded the New Zealand Geotechnical Society Geomechanics Award. He led a paper “Development of an empirical correlation for predicting shear wave velocity of Christchurch soils from cone penetration test data,” (published in Soil Dynamics & Earthquake Engineering, 75, 66-75, 2015) . The paper was authored with Brendon A. Bradley (University of Canterbury); Merrick L. Taylor (Arup); Liam M. Wotherspoon (University of Auckland); and Misko Cubrinovski (University of Canterbury).

We decided to dig deeper and while we felt we had experienced a fair amount of soil looseness since 2011, decided  to start with a more scientific understanding the importance of ‘soil stiffness’. 

Why is understanding ‘soil stiffness’ important when it comes to understanding how the earth shakes and moves.

The magnitude and distribution of stiffness in the soil profile below a site plays a critical role in how earthquake ground motions coming from the underlying bedrock are amplified or de-amplified at the ground surface. In terms of magnitude, softer soils will tend to amplify lower frequency parts of the motion, while stiffer soils will amplify higher frequencies. In terms of distribution, the presence of large abrupt changes in stiffness between layers will also strongly influence the site effects. The shear wave velocity profile of a site provides the information necessary to account for these site specific effects in engineering analysis as shear wave velocity is directly proportional to small strain shear stiffness.

There’s an unprecedented dataset in the Christchurch region and this is a low-cost experimental method – in what way is this important globally? Who would be interested in this, and in what parts of the world?

The correlation between cone penetration test (CPT) data and shear wave velocity developed in this work combined with the unprecedentedly large and spatially dense CPT data set made available through the New Zealand Geotechnical Database project enables an assessment of the spatial variability of shear wave velocity across the region that hasn’t ever been possible before at this scale and resolution anywhere in the world. Establishing a sensible way to account for the inherent variability of soils in engineering analysis is an important topic of research, and researchers all over the world are interested in the insights that the Christchurch dataset can provide.

Can you describe a place/context out in the field in the Christchurch region which demonstrates your work in a practical way?

The two strong motion stations in Lyttelton provide a textbook example of the importance of local site effects. One station is sited on rock, while the other is sited on soft soils. The ground motions from the February 2011 earthquake recorded at these sites are dramatically different, with the softer site showing a large amplification at lower frequencies relative to the rock site. Because the position and distance of these stations relative to the earthquake source are essentially identical, any differences in the recorded ground motions can be attributed to site effects and the dramatic differences observed for the February event highlight the importance of the soil stiffness in the surficial ground motions.