Tag Archives: College of Education

Under Pressure: Understanding assessment anxiety

Help your students cope with assessment-related anxiety with this new online resource by Dr Valerie Sotardi (College of Education, Health & Human Development | Te Rāngai Ako me te Hauora educational psychologist) and Associate Professor Erik Brogt (Learning Evaluation and Academic Development team).

First year students can be particularly vulnerable as they transition to university life, but help is at hand with new resources for students and teachers, funded by Ako Aotearoa, New Zealand’s Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence, and available on their website.

Top tips for teachers:
• Being familiar with NCEA content and structure
• Teaching for transfer of knowledge
• Setting clear expectations
• Communicating the purpose of an assessment
• Building student confidence
• Identifying a clear contact person for the course
• Creating a sense of belonging
• The learning environment matters
• Knowing the referral process

Read the full guide here: Mitigating Assessment Anxiety in First-Year University Students: A resource guide for teaching staff

Read the news story here>

Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the College of Education, Health and Human Development

We have commissioned global recruitment firm, Fisher Leadership to assist in conducting an international recruitment search for the role of Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the Te Rāngai Ako me te Hauora | College of Education, Health and Human Development. If you would like to know more about the position it is currently being advertised on our Work at UC page on the internet>

 

Jandals 3 – Fia Fia Night

Co-hosted by the UC College of Education, Health and Human Development and the Pacific Development Team, Jandals 3 – Fia Fia Night is a chance for staff, students and our  local community to come together, listen to some great speakers, play some fun games and witness some outstanding performances.

This is a free event and food will also be provided. Come along bring your flat mates, family and friends for a night to remember!

What: Jandals 3 – Fia Fia night

Where: Engineering Core, University of Canterbury: 69 Creyke Rd

When: 1 August 2018

Time: 5pm -7.30pm

Congratulations Shanee Barraclough

Graduation is a time of celebration around campus for UC’s students – some of whom are also members of staff.

We congratulate Lecturer / Coordinator of Counsellor Education Shanee Barraclough, who is graduating with her PhD (Education), why she chose to embark on study at UC.

Q: What motivated you to embark on this course of study?
I had previously worked as a Psychologist for fifteen years before becoming interested in Counsellor Education at UC.

I initially worked as a Clinical Educator in both the Master of Counselling programme and the Child and Family Psychology programme, before gaining a permanent position as a Lecturer in Counselling.  At the same time I embarked on my PhD, in order to both further contribute to knowledge in the field of counsellor education as well as to obtain the requisite qualification for my position.

Q: Why are you interested in this area of study?
A: Coming into the role of Counsellor Educator I recognised that, while in my professional work as a Psychologist and Counsellor I had developed expertise in therapeutic models of change with clients, a different kind of knowledge base was required for educating counsellors.

In addition, because the taught model of therapeutic change in the Counselling Programme was underpinned by social constructionist principles, I recognised the need for the philosophy of counsellor education to align with this. Thus, I embarked on a PhD to further develop knowledge around identity and education for counsellors-in-training.    

Q: What is your advice for anyone else juggling work and study? 
A: Juggling work, study and family over the previous five years has been a challenge! Having support from both colleagues and family members to enable me to prioritise time to focus on my PhD has been essential.  Deadlines and excellent PhD supervisors have been helpful as has a lot of yoga!

Q: What does it mean to you to graduate?
A:
Graduation is an opportunity to mark and celebrate an important achievement, for myself and with those who have supported me in making this achievement possible. I am especially pleased to be able to have my parents in the audience who worked hard to enable both myself and my brother to be the first to achieve University degrees in our family, as well as to have my daughter there so she too can begin to imagine what might be possible for her.

UC Child Well-Being Research Institute: Whiriwhiria, kia ora ai te tamaiti

Co-Directors of a new UC Research Institute, Professor Gail Gillon, Pro-Vice Chancellor of the College of Education, Health and Human Development, and Dr Angus Macfarlane, Professor of Māori Research, are pleased to announce the launch of the Child Wellbeing Research Institute.

They declare that the Institute will be driven by maintaining a focus on the skills required when drawing from sound research  platforms in the explorations for better understandings of how to support the success of our tamariki, particularly those who face challenges in their learning, and healthy development.

This work has culminated in the emergence of the Institute under the emblem Whiriwhiria, kia ora ai te tamaiti – Braiding education and health together so the child will flourish. The overall aim of the institute will be to advance high quality, multidisciplinary research that enhances the learning success and healthy development of children and young people.

The focus will be multidisciplinary, and will promote high-quality research related to infants, children, and adolescents within the context of their whānau, family and community. There will be a strong commitment to leading the way in the development of a strengths-based discourse that speaks to the context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

The Institute will co-construct its projects with partner organisations, tribal entities, and communities of interest locally and on the wider frontiers. It will embrace the premises of Vision Mātauranga and build on the learnings and realities from Te Ao Māori and Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa.

Four major themes will prevail: learning success,  physical and cultural wellbeing, social and emotional wellbeing, and child population health and wellbeing. Strands that will weave across these themes will include: Vision Mātuaranga, whānau and community big data analysis, economic impact analysis, digital technologies, critique, policy, and advocacy.

Staff are invited to a reception to launch this research venture:

Date: Wednesday 14 March, 2018
Time: 10am
Venue: Undercroft Seminar Room 101, Ilam campus, University of Canterbury
RSVP: Dr Amy Scott, Project Manager – amy.scott@canterbury.ac.nz / (03) 369 3980