Tag Archives: Computer Use

How to Stop Word Opening in Read Mode

It can be annoying when email attachments or SharePoint documents open in read-only view every time. You may be noticing this if you have just been upgraded to Windows 10 and Office 2016, as the default is to open attachments in “Read Mode”. This is a protective feature to help users avoid getting viruses from email attachments. A document that is open in Read Mode shows this button active in the lower right corner of the Word window:

However, if you are sure the attachment is from a trusted source,  for example from UC colleagues or UC SharePoint sites, then you can stop Word opening documents in Read Mode, and instead have it open them in the standard Print Layout view we are used to working in.

  1. Open Microsoft Word
  2. Click the File menu (at the far left end of the Ribbon)
  3. Click Options (at the bottom of the File menu)
    The Word Options dialogue box displays.
  4. Click the General tab (in the upper left corner of the dialogue box)
  5. Scroll down – almost to the bottom – to the check box / tick box: “Open e-mail attachments and other uneditable files in reading view”
  6. Un-check/un-tick the check box
  7. Click the OK button to save the change.


For more great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

The Life And Times Of Your Passwords

Let’s talk passwords. Exciting isn’t it?

But wait: do you use a key for your front door? Are you happy giving it to strangers? No? Well, this is the same thing, so it’s important we think about how secure our digital life is too. Being digitally security-aware is just as important as being home security-aware.

Here’s the thing, remember three passwords, and that’s it:

  1. Your bank password – don’t use this for anything else
  2. Your work password – don’t use this for anything else
  3. Your password manager password – don’t use this for anything else. Keep reading, to find out what a password manager is and how it can make your life easier.

It’s simple, some accounts are more important than others, especially your work and your bank, so have individual passwords for them, and then one more for your password manager.

Have you fallen into the trap of using the same password for everything?
It sounds like a clever strategy to avoid forgetting which is which, but have you noticed how those online security breaches just seem to keep happening? That clever strategy of yours means that sooner or later your password to everything is going to get into the wrong hands, and then someone else has your password to everything. Not good.

Tip 1: Don’t use the same password in multiple places.

OK, so how do you remember multiple passwords?
Answer: you don’t.

Tip 2: Use a password manager.
A password manager is like a locked safe containing a different password for every site you need one for (this is a very good thing), and it applies the right password for each site when you need it. Basically, it keeps track of all those passwords that are not your work and bank passwords. To get into your password manager, you use a “master” password, which should be a long and unguessable password. An odd sentence with no spaces works well – but “theywillneverguessthisone” has already been figured out, so be more clever than that. If someone can guess your master password, they can get to all your passwords, so be diligent about that long and unguessable password.

Sometimes you can use two factor authentication to make this master password even more secure. (Two factor authentication is a process whereby after you enter a password into the system, you then need to do something else with something you have, such as entering a code that the system sent to your (preregistered) cellphone, or entering a number displayed on a token, or inserting or touching a special USB device.)

Some Password managers you might to look at are Lastpass, Keepass or Dashlane.

Here is an article and some videos about the value of using Password managers:

https:///washingtonpost.com/technology/2018/07/12/your-password-has-likely-been-stolen-heres-what-to-do-about-it


Check out our Archive of Tech Tips. Click the link, then press the ‘End’ key on your keyboard to jump to the end of the Archive list where the most recent Tips are.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Outlook Tips: Email management, calendar wrangling, etc

If you are looking for Outlook tips, you have come to the right place. Email management, calendar wrangling, typing using Macrons, emailing files in effortless ways… it’s all in this Outlook compilation from the Tech Tips Archive:

Outlook Tech Tips

Enjoy!


For more great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

25 Great Efficiency Tips

If you haven’t seen these yet, you are in for a treat:

25 Great Tips To Help You Get Your Work Done

Each one only takes a moment to implement, but can save you hours each month.

And remember, if you can’t find something, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.


Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Technology Information for Staff

Have you looked at the Technology Information for Staff web site yet? Have a quick look at it now to get a feel for what’s there.

The Technology Information for Staff site is a portal to the everyday things you need to know while doing your job here at UC.

If you are looking for IT information, this is the  place to start. It covers everything from passwords to training, remote access to electronic filing, SPAM to traveling with your mobile devices, Skype for Business to ergonomics, and more.

The Technology Information for Staff site also serves as an IT Induction for new staff, so please direct new staff members to it (it is also on the New Staff Orientation Checklist). If you are a new staff member you can work through it, starting on your first day and continuing from there.

You should find this website useful at any time. It is self-service, but you may need to ask a colleague to assist you from time to time. Managers /Heads may wish to nominate such a person, and should ensure that any new staff members know who to talk to when the content directs them to check with ‘a colleague’.

If you can’t find something, or have a suggestion for the Technology Information for Staff website, please email Learning and Development.


Have you seen our Archive of Tech Tips? Click the link, then press the ‘End’ key on your keyboard to jump to the end of the Archive list where the most recent Tips are.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Keeping UC staff informed