Tag Archives: event

Techniques for Building on Participants’ Prior Knowledge

Techniques for Building on Participants’ Prior Knowledge
Elizabeth Lochhead and Jessica Ritchie, UC Academic Skills Centre
Wednesday 22 August, 2.00pm-3.30pm
Room 210, Puaka James Hight Building, Ilam Campus

Have you ever wished you could use what your participants already know to help them learn more effectively?

Prior knowledge is important for learning new skills. This workshop covers techniques for building on prior knowledge in learning sessions. As a participant you will explore how prior knowledge is relevant to your learning contexts and practise applying these techniques.

Elizabeth Lochhead and Jessica Ritchie are Learning Advisors at the University of Canterbury Academic Skills Centre. They have run tutor training sessions for the Pacific Development and Student Care teams, in addition to training advisors in their own team.


You will find more professional development offerings  at Learning and Development.

Problem Solving Circles – Whiria te Taura Tangata – update #8

Kia ora koutou! Our next seminar on organisational culture leadership is nearly upon us. This year seems to be flying by so I hope you are able to take the time to attend one of the four Blue CLUES options coming up.

UC Leaders will have received their invitations to this event.

The culture development activities we are undergoing as part of making the changes we have said we want are focusing on three levels – organisational, group/team and individual. 

Problem Solving Circles focus at the group level and can be used with intact teams or with people who come together for a specific or even one-off purpose. For example – when initiating something new or examining an opportunity or problem (research groups, project teams) or when debriefing (root-cause analysis or critical incident debrief team). They can be used to examine an issue or a topic over a period of time but are also helpful when a quick decision is needed.

In groups we often jump to an early solution. We frequently  don’t properly define the issue. We may not listen to everyone’s opinions. Problem Solving Circles are a series of tools wrapped into one process to help us overcome these situations. They support constructive behaviours within the group.

We invite work areas to consider hosting a Blue CLUES. This will involve opening the session and giving us a look into your culture journey. We’ll help with the content of the session and do all the admin. Your HR Advisors will approach you about taking a turn.

Thanks to the College of Education, Health and Human Development for hosting the upcoming seminar.

August Blue CLUES: Problem Solving Circles

As Acting Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the College of Education, Health and Human Development I’m delighted the College will be hosting our next Whiria Te Taura Tangata – Blues Clues – with a focus on Problem Solving Circles. There will be four workshops scheduled at different times to help staff find one to fit their schedule.

Each workshop will be opened by a different leader from our College who will reflect on their experience of problem solving in the context of leading change in their School or unit. We hope that these workshops will provide leaders from across UC an opportunity to come together and reflect on how we solve problems at the moment, and how this particular methodology could help us improve our constructive engagement across teams and units.

From my perspective and experience of using this tool at UC, I’ve appreciated how straightforward using the Problem Solving Circles method actually is. I’ve found the process can support a team or group to collaboratively arrive at a better quality outcome – without the need for expert facilitation or individual skill development.   Letitia

Professor Letitia Hochstrasser Fickel, Ed.D,
Acting Pro-Vice Chancellor | Amorangi Taupua, College of Education, Health & Human Development |Te Rāngai Ako me te Hauora.

Finding Out More

I write this from home following foot surgery and I will miss the first couple of Blue CLUES. I leave you in the very capable hands of the College of Education, Health and Human Development and my colleagues. Ngā mihi mō tō manaakitanga mai,  Karen Mather.

At home with the reality of death – reflections on Teece Exhibition

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Curator, Teece Museum / Logie Collection, Terri Elder offers a personal perspective on the very popular exhibition Beyond the Grave: death in ancient times. 

It’s a somewhat strange situation to find that an exhibition all about death has turned into a celebration of life. The current exhibition at the Teece Museum  Beyond the Grave: death in ancient times, explores Greek and Roman attitudes to death and rituals around dying. It would be easy to imagine the topic being a little sad, but for me personally, I found the resulting exhibition is far from being gloomy or ghoulish.

 There are of course some very poignant details, such as the archaeological evidence of numerous infant graves, made necessary by the staggeringly high infant mortality rate in ancient Greece of 50%. The grief on the faces of the mourners depicted on the Canosan askos (JLMC 186.00) rings true in the face of such statistics.  There are also the bizarre stories of misadventure, like the ancient ‘urban legend’ which contends that the famous Greek playwright Aeschyllus met his end when a passing eagle dropped a turtle on the writer’s head! An unusual death for a soldier that had already survived the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE.

However, the strongest message I get from the ancient artefacts included in this exhibition is that the ancient Greeks and Romans were perhaps a little more at home with the reality of death as a normal part of life than many of us seem to be today. 

Death was obviously a part of their everyday experience, and the ritual artefacts they left behind show an appreciation of celebrating and remembering their loved ones actively and regularly, not just at a funeral.

The Logie Collection’s array of white-ground lekythoi, which depict scenes of Greek mourners paying ritual visits to the graves of their ancestors, capture this very well.

The artefacts in ‘Beyond the Grave’ also have in common a sense of having been created with a real commitment to communicating both beauty and purpose. The lavish grave-marking vases and sculptures of the wealthy are exquisitely crafted and decorated, but even humble grave goods, (such as the miniature terracotta horse ca.740-720 BCE, of a type often found in the graves of children, JLMC 161.75), resonate with a sense of affection and thoughtfulness.  

The exhibition runs until February 2019 at the Teece Museum, so there is plenty of time to visit and explore for yourselves whether the ancient Greek and Roman experience of death is so very different from that of our own.”

WHERE: Teece Museum, 3 Hereford St, Christchurch

WHEN: Wed-Sun, 11am-3pm, to Sunday, 24 February 2019

Entry by donation

One slide, three minutes – Thesis in three finals Tuesday 14 August

Thesis-in-three is an opportunity for Doctoral and Masters thesis students to present their research in three minutes using a single powerpoint slide.

The UC finals will be held on Tuesday 14 August, 6pm, C3.

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Fact file:

  • Students have three minutes only to describe
    what they are doing, why they are doing it –
    the importance/impact of the research and
    how they are doing it.
  • Only a single slide, no additional electronic
    media (e.g. sound and video files) and no
    additional props.
  • There is a national Three Minute Thesis (3MT) for Master’s
    students. This year this will be held at UC on 24 August. 
  • The best UC Doctoral student will represent UC at the Asia-Pacific Competition in Brisbane.
  • The Thesis in Three format was first introduced
    by the University of Queensland.

Beyond Manapouri: Q and A with author Catherine Knight

Canterbury University Press (CUP) and the University Bookshop are pleased to invite you to a Q&A event with Catherine Knight, author of Beyond Manapouri: 50 years of environmental politics in New Zealand chaired by Dr Ann Brower, senior lecturer in Geography.

  • Tuesday 14 August
  • 5.30pm for 6.00pm start 

For more information, see the Events page>