Tag Archives: event

Wakaroa Pigeon Bay Art Trail – Easter weekend

Easter Weekend, Saturday 31 March – Sunday 1 April
Open daily 10.00am – 5.00pm, free admission.

Celebrate the life of Wakaroa Pigeon Bay through site-responsive artworks and installations across five sites in Wakaroa Pigeon Bay over Easter Weekend. From the bus shelter at Summit Rd/Pigeon Bay Rd, Knox churchyard, Pigeon Bay Hall, and Pigeon Bay Boating Club to Wakaroa point with support from Annandale.

Based on research towards a Masters in Fine Arts at  University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha, this trail provides a space to explore a community story that has developed over generations, and investigates ideas of identity, expressions of heritage and tradition, and relationships to place in Aotearoa New Zealand.

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Responding to oral narratives shared by the Bay community over many months and using locally sourced materials such as sunlight, plants, timber and recycled fabric, these works have been co-created with the community of Wakaroa Pigeon Bay and operate as signposts to exchanges, experiences and encounters of place. Tying in with an exhibition by local art makers at Pigeon Bay Hall over the same weekend, this trail invites everyone to relax, explore, participate and share in the story of the Bay.

Accompanying the trail is a public programme of free workshops including storytelling with The Court Theatre, tī kouka cabbage tree leaf ropemaking with Rekindle, edible weeds and tastings with KoruKai, and palm readings with Expressions of Divinity, as well as bands, The Great Depression Blues Band and Swan Sisters, performances by various artists scheduled each day, and a special talk by June Hay presenting 100 years of Pigeon Bay from 1914- 2014 through photographs and stories in Knox Church at 3.00pm on Sunday 1 April.

Bring a picnic, stay for the day! Nau mai haere mai ki a koutou, all welcome!

This trail has been made possible thanks to the wonderful support of Te Rūnanga o Koukourārata, University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha, Centre of Contemporary Art (CoCA), Christchurch City Council, Harbour Arts Trust, Duvauchelle School, Pigeon Bay Recreation Reserve, Cake NZ, and the Wakaroa Pigeon Bay community. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa!

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Thursdays in Black re-launch – 22 March

Being safe on campus, in public or in your home is everyone’s right, regardless of your race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender identity, class, disability (visible or not), religious affiliation, political views, or even the way you choose to dress. 

Thursdays in Black is a national student/whanau movement that works towards a world free of rape and violence. #TIB campaigns for campuses to be safe for everyone.

The UCSA has teamed up with the UC Thursdays in Black Society for the 2018 relaunch BBQ. Head down to C-Block lawn from 11am on Thursday 22 March for a free sausage, a few tunes and a special  guest speaker.

Come for a chat, with the people dressed in BLACK. They will happily provide information about the campaign and how you can get involved. We want to hear what you want, and give you information about all the  support services available on our campus and in the Christchurch area.

Make sure you wear BLACK and come along to be a part of positive change on campus.

Sexuality education symposium at UC

On 15-16 March internationally leading sexuality education researchers and local youth workers are convening at UC to engage with the public to consider what else sexuality education could become at State of the Art: New Directions in Sexuality Education/ Current Social Science Theories In Practice Symposium.

Panel presentations and interactive workshops will draw on cutting edge international and Australasian research and local initiatives to explore directions in sexuality education that can better equip diverse young people to engage meaningfully with both the pleasures and challenges of crafting intimate relationships in today’s world.

Topics include:

  • Sexuality Education Beyond the Classroom and Beyond Intervention: Lessons from The Beyond Bullying Project (Panel Presentation)
  • Engaging with diversity in sexuality education – new material and posthumanist provocations  (Professor Louisa Allan and Associate Professor Kathleen Quinlivan)
  • What do unicorns have to do with gender? How can research better inform practice to support gender diverse young people and their families? (Dr Sue Bagshaw)

What more can sexuality and relationships education become in an era of consumption and digital technologies?

Sexuality and relationships education is paradoxically both everywhere and nowhere in today’s world. A  lot of anxiety, and sometimes panic, surrounds learning about sexualities and relationships both within and outside schools.

Research shows that school based sexuality education programmes struggle to engage with contemporary sexualities and relationships issues with children and young people.

As a subject, sexuality education sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools. Programmes are under-resourced and under-valued and research shows that the curriculum struggles to make itself relevant and meaningful to young people in terms of their lived experiences of negotiating intimate relationships and pleasure in a digital world.

Young people feel frustrated with the emphasis on the biological aspects of sexuality, and  want to learn more about gender diversity, violence in relationships, intimacy, sexual pleasure and love.

Parents too, feel out of their depth with knowing how best to educate their children and young people about sexuality and relationships in an era of consumption and digital technologies.

Once framed as private, sexualities, relationships and gender politics are everywhere. Programmes such as Married at First Sight show adults negotiating the complexities of intimate relationships, including in some cases, relationships as commodities to be ‘shopped for’.

Campaigns such as #metoo are in response to sexual harassment (although not without consequences for some young women). Campaigns for sexual and gender diversity call into question heterosexuality and gender normalcy.

In an era of social and digital media, it’s not surprising to see diverse young people are increasingly taking sexuality education into their own hands. Sexting has increased amongst teens  in recent years, largely as a consensual activity, it occurs primarily  within the contexts of an intimate relationship.

However a recent Australian survey shows that  young women aged 18-19 in digital spaces are  more likely to be on the receiving end of degrading comments about gender, sexual harassment and unwanted sexual advances.

Rather than criminalise sexting, and telling young people not to do it, sexuality education researchers suggest that sexuality education needs to focus more on helping young people to imagine and participate in conversations related to sexualities and relationships both within and outside school.

For more information about speakers and topics, and to register, please click here.

UC Child Well-Being Research Institute: Whiriwhiria, kia ora ai te tamaiti

Co-Directors of a new UC Research Institute, Professor Gail Gillon, Pro-Vice Chancellor of the College of Education, Health and Human Development, and Dr Angus Macfarlane, Professor of Māori Research, are pleased to announce the launch of the Child Wellbeing Research Institute.

They declare that the Institute will be driven by maintaining a focus on the skills required when drawing from sound research  platforms in the explorations for better understandings of how to support the success of our tamariki, particularly those who face challenges in their learning, and healthy development.

This work has culminated in the emergence of the Institute under the emblem Whiriwhiria, kia ora ai te tamaiti – Braiding education and health together so the child will flourish. The overall aim of the institute will be to advance high quality, multidisciplinary research that enhances the learning success and healthy development of children and young people.

The focus will be multidisciplinary, and will promote high-quality research related to infants, children, and adolescents within the context of their whānau, family and community. There will be a strong commitment to leading the way in the development of a strengths-based discourse that speaks to the context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

The Institute will co-construct its projects with partner organisations, tribal entities, and communities of interest locally and on the wider frontiers. It will embrace the premises of Vision Mātauranga and build on the learnings and realities from Te Ao Māori and Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa.

Four major themes will prevail: learning success,  physical and cultural wellbeing, social and emotional wellbeing, and child population health and wellbeing. Strands that will weave across these themes will include: Vision Mātuaranga, whānau and community big data analysis, economic impact analysis, digital technologies, critique, policy, and advocacy.

Staff are invited to a reception to launch this research venture:

Date: Wednesday 14 March, 2018
Time: 10am
Venue: Undercroft Seminar Room 101, Ilam campus, University of Canterbury
RSVP: Dr Amy Scott, Project Manager – amy.scott@canterbury.ac.nz / (03) 369 3980

International recruitment counsellors visit UC

On Thursday 1 March the IRO hosted 11 counsellors from international recruitment agencies in Auckland. 

This gave us a chance to showcase the campus and for the Counsellors to meet with key members of the teams that  they work with. 

Admissions, Conversion Management, EDP, the College of Business and Law and College of Science were all in attendance at the informal meetings in the morning. 

Ian MacDonald joined us for lunch in the Shilling Club, and Elizabeth Zou our on campus Team China rep and Lydia Liu of UCIC took them on a campus tour, that included a walk around the Ernest Rutherford Building. 

The campus was much admired and the day was rounded off with a city tour. where we took the opportunity to show just how far Christchurch has come.