Tag Archives: event

The Grounds Department is having a Plant Sale

GROUNDS PLANT SALE – THURSDAY 29 November

One day only,  rain or shine

What:  Would you like to buy a Rhododendron for ONE DOLLAR?!

Due to the nursery downsizing and wanting to do less watering in Summer, the Grounds Department is having a Clearance Sale of Plants

— Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Camellias
— Natives, Cultivated Natives
— Exotics

Nothing above $10.00

Price includes plant, the pot it came in, and soil. Weeds are free.

Bring a bag, bring a box, bring a trailer.
Buy, buy and take away.

Payment only by EFTPOS, Debit / Credit Cards
– Absolutely NO Cash Sales.

Where: Grounds Department on Homestead Lane opposite CLV Ilam Apartments

When: 8.00am -4.00pm

Other  items available to purchase, inquire on the day.
SAFETY FIRST:  Enclosed shoes must be worn, Beware slips, trips and falls.

Professional development – putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga

John Kapa, Kapoipoi, Student Development Advisor Māori  explains the significance of putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga, including an opportunity for professional development. 

Putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga – Wednesday 14 November, 1.30pm-3.30pm

This is a workshop co-ordinated by the Professional Learning Community of in-house trainers.
Places are limited – if you would like to attend, please contact the Learning & Development team requesting an invitation (with the location) to be sent to you.

Relationships are important. The idea of AU (I) is more than being individualistic, rather it is also the strength of connection and working as a collective found in whakawhanAUngatanga. Whakawhanaungatanga is the act of and is the process of establishing links, making connections and relating to the people one meets by identifying in culturally appropriate ways, whakapapa linkages, past heritages, points of engagement, or other relationships.

In a metaphoric sense, Mead (2003) asserts that whanaungatanga reaches beyond actual whakapapa relationships and includes relationships to people who are not kin but who, through shared experiences, feel and act as kin.

Exploring this further, this session looks at your self-identified attributes around whanaungatanga to identify touch points and how this could be applied positively at work with peers or with ākonga (students) for example. This will be undertaken through exercises and pūrakau (stories).

 


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11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month – aftermath and legacies to be discussed

An Evening With Kate Hunter (VUW) and David Monger: The eleventh hour of the eleventh day – Tuesday, 6 November 2018

In October 1918 New Zealander Robert Gilkison was sitting beside his ‘dangerously wounded’ son’s hospital bed in France. He wrote to his daughter Norah ‘Poor old Robbie still has his ups and downs, and I was warned at the first it would take a long time to effect a cure’. Robert’s letter, written within a few weeks of the signing of the November Armistice, was prescient in warning that it would ‘take a long time to effect a cure’. It is a useful way to think about the end of the war, and not just for the wounded and the family members who had to care for them.

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month is so etched in our minds as the moment that the guns supposedly fell silent, we risk forgetting or ignoring what that actually meant. The Armistice declared on 11 November 1918 signalled the end of what H.G. Wells called ‘the war to end war’. Yet we know that conflict and strife continued. What the Armistice signalled in some places was the beginning of the really difficult work of reconstruction – rebuilding towns and cities, people and their relationships, bodies and minds. In others it signalled nations’ abandonment or disavowal of wartime activities, concerns or promises.

In this conversation, Victoria University of Wellington’s Kate Hunter and the UC’s David Monger discuss the aftermath and legacies of a global conflict.

David Monger has lectured at the UC History Department since 2010 and is Senior Lecturer in Modern European History. An expert on British First World War propaganda, he is the author of Patriotism and Propaganda in First World War Britain: the National War Aims Committee and Civilian Morale (2012), co-editor of Endurance and the First World War: Experiences and Legacies in New Zealand and Australia (2014) and has published several articles on First World War topics.

Associate Professor Kate Hunter (VUW) has been researching and teaching the cultural history of WWI for more than 15 years. She is the author of numerous articles and book chapters, many of which use the letters and diaries of those separated from kin and friends to explore family and romantic relationships. Her most recent book on WWI was a collaboration with Te Papa curator Kirstie Ross, Holding on to Home: New Zealand Stories and Objects of the First World War, which used the material culture of war to focus on the enduring relationships between those serving overseas and their loved ones in New Zealand.

  • Date: Tuesday, 6 November 2018
  •  Time: 06:00pm to 07:30pm
  •  Location: Recital Room, UC Arts, Arts Centre of Christchurch, 3 Hereford St, Christchurch City
  •  Ticket: Free but REGISTER NOW>

Indonesia’s policy response to the Indo-Pacific concept

Speaker:   Dr Dewi Fortuna Anwar

Date:         Thursday 18 October 2018

Time:         5pm for 5:30pm

Venue:      South Arts Lecture Theatre A6

Abstract: Dr Dewi Fortuna Anwar has researched and written widely on Indonesian foreign policy, ASEAN, the Indo-Pacific concept (from an Indonesian perspective) and Indonesian politics. In her talk she will focus on the Indo-Pacific concept and the current state of play with Indonesia and ASEAN.

Speaker bio: Dr Dewi Fortuna Anwar is the Sir Howard Kippenberger Visiting Professor in Strategic Studies for 2018. She is a Research Professor at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) and was the Deputy Chairman for Social Sciences and Humanities from 2001–10. She was Deputy Secretary for Political Affairs from 2010-2015 and from 2015 to 2017 as Deputy for Government Policy Support to the Vice President of the Republic of Indonesia. She is also the Chair of the Institute for Democracy and Human Rights at the Habibie Center, and a member of the Board of Advisors, the Institute for Peace and Democracy, the Bali Democracy Forum. Anwar was a member of the UN Secretary General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters (2008–12), a member of the Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission (WMDC), based in Stockholm, and a member of the International Advisory Board of the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy, ANU, Australia.

GradFest 2018

Spring Gradfest is designed to help postgraduate students navigate their thesis journey, as well as meet other postgraduates at UC. Please encourage your students to attend.

What’s Gradfest? A week of free seminars, workshops, and social events especially for postgrad students on such topics as

  • The research ethics approval process
  • How to give a research presentation
  • Managing stress
  • Preparing for the Oral exam
  • The publication process and more

When’s Gradfest? Monday 29 October to Friday 2 November 2018.

View the programme and register here>