Tag Archives: event

Come and support our colleague: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution made by Professor Clemency Montelle and Professor Geoffrey Rodgers in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date                Thursday 3 October, from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Venue             E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend these lectures, to actively support our new professors, and to take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Extraordinary scientific exchanges between Europe and India in the 18th century

Presented by Professor Clemency Montelle

International collaboration makes for fruitful innovation, and historical studies show this isn’t just a modern phenomenon.  In November 1730, a young Portuguese astronomer named Pedro Da Silva travelled to India, bringing with him a copy of the 1727 reprint of Philippe de La Hire’s Tabulae astronomicae. Working in the court of Jayasiṃha, Emperor of Jaipur, in the subsequent years, da Silva and other Jesuit priests collaborated alongside Indian astronomers to produce versions of this work in Sanskrit.   I explore this fascinating case of transmission by comparing passages from the 1727 reprint in Latin and the subsequent Sanskrit translations and some of the surprising consequences of introducing new science to a contrasting culture of inquiry.

Research into earthquake engineering and hip replacement implants

Presented by Professor Geoffrey Rodgers

This talk will cover the closely related, yet seemingly disparate fields of earthquake engineering and biomedical engineering. Perhaps surprisingly, the finer details of research in both these fields can require a closely similar skill-set, despite the vastly different fields of application.

This talk will first cover recent research into novel energy dissipation and seismic damping devices, and their application to low-damage structures to improve the resilience of built environment. Implementation of these new structural design methods and devices, both locally within the Christchurch Rebuild, and internationally, will be covered.

This talk will also cover the use of ultrasonic sensors, video motion capture, and human gait analysis, to better understand the mechanics of hip replacement implants within the human body. This increased understanding of the in-service implant mechanics will help to design additional methods to diagnose impending Dysfunction of Osteo-Mechanics (DOOM) and potentially improve hip replacement implant designs.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Professor Ian Wright, Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Edible Campus Walking Tour

Did you know UC is an edible campus?

Join the UC Sustainability team for a lunch-hour adventure as we show you the best spots for finding lemons, limes, feijoa, raspberries, walnuts, figs, pears, plums and more. The best bit? Foraging is free, fun, and everything can be found right on our Ilam campus!

What: Edible Campus Walking Tour

When: Monday 30 September, 12pm – 12.50pm

Where: Meet the team outside Café 1894 at 12pm. The tour will wind around campus, and will finish in Waiutuutu Community Garden at 12.50pm. If you can, stay on and have a cup of fresh herbal tea or have your lunch with us in the garden afterwards.

For more information, and for any event updates, check out the Facebook event here.

See you there!

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on FacebookInstagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This event is part of our contribution to World Green Campus Day, where we join universities across NZ and Australia to celebrate sustainable practices on campus. For more information, see their website

Agri-Food Research Network Conference – December 1-5, 2019

This summer, the University of Canterbury (UC) and Lincoln University will play host to the 26th annual Australasian Agri-Food Research Network (AFRN) meeting. The event brings together leading social scientists from New Zealand, Australia and the world who conduct interdisciplinary research on the socio-ecological dynamics of food — from farm production, through local and global commodity chains, to its consumption, including the waste generated. The conference venue usually alternates between Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand universities; plus Indonesia in 2017.

This year’s theme is Re-territorialisation Unleashed. Presentations will examine the continued transformation of global capital and financial networks in agri-food systems, while some will grapple with non-human agency and the moral and economic landscapes of food production. Other topics addressed include consumption (health and nutrition, values and ethics) and food ‘cultures’ across time and space, the ‘mainstream’ food system (supermarkets, banks, brands, and food security policy) and alternative food systems such as organics, urban and local food movements, and fair trade.

Sessions and workshops will include: postcolonial approaches to agri-food, the pursuit of new and improved proteins, the circular economy, regenerative agriculture and a shared responsibility approach to sustainability.

Keynote speakers will address food packaging and indigenous foodways. Professor Emerita Anne Murcott (SOAS Food Studies Centre, London) will address the broad question ‘how did food packaging get this way?’, while Dr John Reid (Ngai Tahu Research Centre) will explore the spaces between indigenous tradition, tribal corporatism, and productivism in relationship to current and future agri-food systems in New Zealand.

A full-day field trip on 1 December will examine the implications of dairy intensification in the Te Waihora/ Lake Ellesmere catchment. Stops will include on-farm conservation associated with Ngai Tahu and Environment Canterbury co-governance, Lincoln University’s research farms and a local winery. An evening field trip on 2 December will visit Cultivate and Ōtākoro Orchard in the CBD.

As well as full price and student registration, a day registration is also available. A postgraduate day on 5 December, and social events are organised and these will introduce people to the local food scene.

For more information, email agrifood2019@canterbury.ac.nz or visit our webpage at:  http://afrn.co/agri-food-xxvi for registration information.

What does a sustainability superhero look like?

Maybe they are doing research on micro-plastics in our waterways? Maybe they are holding climate challenge conferences, or built a fully recyclable electric car? Maybe they are doing academic research on waterways, biodiversity, or on sustainability in education? Maybe they always arrive to work irritatingly cheerful and refreshed after cycling to work each morning?  They might even be sitting right next to you…. (sipping coffee from a reusable cup of course)

Nominate your sustainability superhero for a Sustainability Award today! Nominations are open from now until Monday 9 September.

The UC Sustainability Awards are about the recognition and celebration of all things sustainability – both on and off campus. This is a great chance to acknowledge the hard work, innovation and imagination of many of our students and staff who are working hard to make our world a better (and greener) place.

Tell us all about them (or yourself!) by finding the nomination form and all the info you need here. Nominations are open until Monday 9 September with the awards being presented by UC Vice Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae Professor Cheryl de la Rey.

We can’t wait to hear all the wonderful things our community has been doing for sustainability!

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on FacebookInstagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This blog is part of our communications plan for the 2019 UC Sustainability Awards. For more information, and for the Awards nomination form, see our website.

 

Celebrating Fresh Thinking – Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Mathieu Sellier and Professor Greg O’Beirne in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date :    Thursday, 5 September, from 4.30 – 6.30pm

Venue: E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

‘Moving the boundaries of fluid mechanics’  – Presented by Professor Mathieu Sellier

Abstract: Many flows encountered in our daily lives involve a moving boundary. The shape of a raindrop, for example, evolves as it falls through the air. Likewise, the free surface of a river deforms as it encounters obstacles. While the mathematical ingredients required to describe such flows have been known since the late 19th century and are encapsulated in the infamous Navier-Stokes equations, solving complex flows with a moving boundary or interface still poses significant challenges and provides stimulating cross-disciplinary research opportunities. The question at the centre of the research I will present is “if information about the evolution of a moving interface is available, can we indirectly infer unknown properties of the flow?” Such a question falls in the realm of inverse problems for which one knows the effect but is looking for the cause. Specifically, I will talk about how it is possible to estimate the fluid properties of lava just by looking at how it flows or what is the best way to rotate a pan to cook the perfect crêpe.

‘Speech, noise, and the Matrix’ – Presented by Professor Greg A. O’Beirne

People with hearing impairment or auditory processing problems find it harder than most to understand speech in background noise, or when parts of the speech signal are missing or distorted. Despite this, most hearing tests still present either pure tones or single words in quiet, and usually use expensive equipment to do it. 

To overcome these shortcomings and better assess the ability to communicate in challenging acoustic environments, my lab has produced a number of innovative adaptive tests of speech intelligibility and auditory processing. These include i) the UCAST-FW – a filtered word test for the diagnosis of auditory processing disorder; ii) internet-based Digit Triplet Tests to screen for sensorineural hearing loss in New Zealand English, Te Reo Māori, and Malay; and iii) the University of Canterbury Auditory-Visual Matrix Sentence Test – a speech-in-noise test in New Zealand English and Malay that allows rapid testing of adults and school-age children, including their ability to use visual cues to supplement the auditory signal.

I’ll discuss how permanent hearing impairment reduces speech clarity even when sounds are audible, and how the testing platform we’ve developed provides an integrated set of tools for improving hearing screening and speech testing in New Zealand, Australia, and south-east Asia.