Tag Archives: event

DIY Beeswax Wraps for Plastic Free July!

Last week, UC Sustainability held a DIY workshop to celebrate our favourite month – Plastic Free July!

Plastic Free July is a global movement that helps millions of people be a part of the solution to plastic pollution. It’s a month long challenge which encourages all of us to ‘choose to refuse’ single use plastics – like takeaway coffee cups, drink bottles, straws, bags and plastic wrappers. We decided we would tackle Plastic Free July by showing our UC community how to make their own alternatives to single use plastics – and we had so much fun doing so!

Almost 100 students (and staff too!) came along and learnt how to make a DIY beeswax wrap and a produce bag with us, so we could all ‘choose to refuse’ this month (and hopefully longer!).For those that missed out, we’ve put together a guide for making your own wraps at home – they make great presents for friends and family too! Read on to see how we made our own beeswax wraps with nothing but some organic beeswax (grated), cotton fabric, scissors, baking paper and an iron. We hope you’ll be inspired to tackle Plastic Free July with us!

Step one: gather your materials

We recommend using only 100% cotton for making beeswax wraps – but don’t feel as though you have to rush off to a fabric store! All the fabric in these photos are either old tee shirts, or are from second hand stores (sheets and pillow cases are usually 100% cotton, and come in funky patterns – just give them a wash and an iron before use). If you want to buy new, Spotlight often has sales on cotton, and there’s a heap of different fabrics to choose from.

We sourced our beeswax from a friend who has bees, but you can get unpackaged beeswax in a small block from most Farmers Markets (including Riccarton Bush and Lyttelton). Bin Inn also sells beeswax in small cubes, but we prefer a block for grating.

We went through a whopping 1kg of beeswax making 100 wraps, but 100g – 200g of beeswax will be more than enough for making your wraps at home.

Step two: cut to size
What sizes you’re after is totally up to you! Here’s the guidelines we used:

  • Small (17cm x 20xm) is good for covering leftover dips, the end of a cucumber, half an avo, or the last mouthful of cheese
  • Medium (31cm x 27cm) is the popular size – it covers a small plate, wraps a sandwich, fits over the end of a 500g block of cheese and perfect for smaller snacks and treats
  • Big (35cm x 33cm) perfect for a large sandwich, wrap, easily covers salad bowls and leftovers in the fridge, and also doubles as an excellent plate on your picnic!

Step three: let’s make your wraps
Now for the fun part!

1. Place your fabric onto a piece of baking paper (we put a towel down first, to avoid a mess!). Sprinkle a small handful of grated beeswax onto the fabric (less is more, as you can always add more afterwards). Make sure the beeswax is spread evenly.

2. Place another piece of baking paper on top of the fabric.

3. Using the iron, firmly press down onto the baking paper. You’ll see the beeswax melting almost immediately. Iron the baking paper as you would normally iron fabric – making sure the beeswax is pushed all the way into the corners (you’ll be able to see through the baking paper – see the pictures below).

4. When all the beeswax is melted and your fabric looks wet, you’re done. Remove the top layer of baking paper and check the beeswax is melted. It should look like the picture on the left below, with an even amount of melted beeswax. The picture on the right needs another go with the iron to melt and re-spread some of the beeswax that has already started to dry.

5. Next, remove the beeswax from the bottom piece of baking paper and hang to dry before it hardens and sticks (you have to be a bit speedy here, but be careful as the wax will be hot). We recommend pegging the wet wrap to a coat hanger or a washing line. It will only take a few minutes to harden and dry completely.

6. You’re done! You’ve just made a beautiful beeswax wrap which will help you say goodbye to plastic cling film for good (plus it makes for much prettier lunches!). To use, wrap around your food or bowl as you would with plastic wrap, and use the warmth of your hands to ‘seal’ the wrap in place. Instant eco-warrior!

Just a few things to note…

  • to clean your wrap, gently hand wash in cool water with a small amount of dishwashing liquid. Hot water will remove the beeswax!
  • please don’t cover raw meat with your wrap – if you need to cover raw meat, use a container or cover it with another plate in the fridge
  • if your wrap starts to lose its ‘stick’ – simply begin the process again! You’ll be able to re-wax and continue to use your wrap for years to come. If it eventually starts to look a little worse for wear, pop it into your compost bin (another reason we love cotton!).

Thanks to everyone who came along to the workshop last week, we hope you had as much fun as we did, and are enjoying using your beeswax wraps. Keep an eye on our Facebook page for more Plastic Free July activities later this week, including student bloggers and the last of our plastic free giveaways.

If you make these at home, we’d love to see the results! Send your best wrap pictures to sustainability@canterbury.ac.nz. 

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on Facebook, Instagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This is part of our contribution to Plastic Free July, where we encourage our UC community quit single use plastics for the month. For more information and tips, see the Plastic Free July website.

UC Careers’ Annual Event Empowering Women

Become a leader by empowering women (and yourself)

UC Careers’ annual event empowering women is back! This year we explore a valuable 21st century skill that’s important for all women to develop. The theme of the event is focused on ‘what do women bring to leadership?’ The best thing about this event is that it brings both staff and students together, so make sure you save the date: Thursday 1 August, 5-7pm, Rehua 226 Te Moana.   

Our inspirational speakers include:

    • Hannah Duder, CEO, Indigo & Iris
    • Stella Ward, Chief Digital Officer, Canterbury and West Coast DHBs
    • Lan Pham, Councillor, Environment Canterbury Regional Council
    • and our very own VC, Professor Cheryl de la Rey

You can RSVP via UC Careers today! Also you can spread the word by sharing the event and RSVP on social media.

So what is this event all about, and why should you attend? Besides leadership being an important 21st century skill, we can develop a sense of fulfillment through recognizing our own leadership skills and attributes, it’s a way of empowering others, and making a positive impact by shaping the world in which we live.

UC Careers’ Annual Event Empowering Women

UC Careers’ annual event overview, highlights questions and various calls to action that the guest speakers will cover:  

Have you thought about what women bring to leadership? Let’s pause and recognize leadership skills and attributes within ourselves and others, and the value of these. Also let’s think about how these can be leveraged to develop and demonstrate leadership.

How would you define leadership? Or have you thought about the meaning women attach to the word leadership? We aim to broaden what we know leadership to be, and celebrate how we can all demonstrate leadership, no matter what opportunities we choose to pursue.

Let’s overcome real/perceived barriers! Sometimes women are held back. What’s stopping women from reaching higher, from taking the lead, and breaking through to the top? We want to break down the barriers holding women back from leadership experiences, so make sure you come and hear the advice these inspirational speakers are keen to share.

Lastly, let’s gather some words of wisdom. A few words and actions can make a big difference. Hear words of wisdom from our guest speakers to support women to embrace leadership.

Remember – Become a leader by empowering women (and yourself)!

RSVP via UC Careers today!    

Also you can spread the word: Share the event and RSVP on social media.

CELEBRATING FRESH THINKING: PROFESSORIAL LECTURE SERIES

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Richard Watt and Professor Jędrzej Białkowski in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date:               Thursday 1 August from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Location:        E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

“The Economics of Music and the Music of Economics” – Presented by Professor Richard Watt, Department of Economics & Finance

Economics, in one way or another, is concerned with decision making – choosing the optimal course of action from among those available. As such, one of the principal applications of economics is to study decision making along the value chain of goods and services in an economy, or more generally, decision making in “markets”. A study of a market begins with the entrepreneurial actions of bringing together inputs (raw materials, labour, capital, etc.) to create something useful, then the resulting goods and services must be made available to the consuming public (decisions around transportation, and retailing), and finally the consumers themselves decide which of them to consume (depending on their income, their preferences, and the prices of the goods and services that are available). Of all of the goods and services that circulate in an economy, “music” is one of the most fascinating, with a series of particular circumstances that have tested standard economic theory in many ways. In this talk, Professor Watt will outline the economics of the “music market”, touching on its special characteristics and the economic institutions that have evolved, and that continue to evolve, to contribute to the music market being functional, profitable, and welfare enhancing.

“Greener than a Greenback: Might the idea of socially responsible investing change the finance industry?” – Presented by Professor Jedrzej Bialkowski, Department of Economics and Finance. 

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the idea of socially responsible (or sustainable and responsible) investing (SRI) has become increasingly popular, attracting a substantial amount of investors’ money and moving from a niche investing strategy to a mainstream one. SRI market participants typically seek to achieve financial returns combined with consideration of some aspect of firms’ environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) profiles. Given the rapid proliferation of green financial products, the increasing assets under management and the differences across the products, it is important to understand this growth and the investor demand behind it.

Professor Jedrzej Bialkowski will discuss the past, current trends and the challenges faced by so-called green finance. In particular, he will focus on the behaviour of SRI investors and the performance of different types of assets in terms of risk/return profile and exposure to ESG values. Light will be shed on the importance of regulations for the development of socially responsible investing.

Professor Ian Wright

Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

 

 

UC Sustainability Champion: Meet Elizabeth

Elizabeth Peters | Masters in Marketing, Plastic Free Blogger and Eco VolunteerThis year, we’re proud to be profiling students and staff who we believe are contributing to the culture of sustainability at UC. We are running this campaign in the lead up to the 2019 UC Sustainability Awards, so get thinking about who you’ll be nominating this year! Nominations for the Awards are open from the 5 – 31 August.

In the meantime, read on and enjoy our latest Sustainability Champion profile from plastic free blogger Elizabeth – we caught up with her just in time for Plastic Free July!

29871827_10155490801062336_7562871590863254003_oElizabeth making a ‘plastic free promise’ during Plastic Free July 2018

Tell us about yourself!

My name is Elizabeth, I grew up in Christchurch. I did my undergraduate at University of Canterbury in Marketing and Management and I am currently doing my Master’s in Marketing on the topic of non-profit advertising. I spent my later years of my childhood growing up in the country and love being in nature. I now flat in town and love biking through the greener areas of Christchurch that remind me of home.

Tell us how you became involved with sustainability at UC.

I started coming along to a few events throughout my undergraduate studies, but it wasn’t until this last year that I got involved with the UC Sustainability Office and started helping more.  I love the work that the sustainability team is doing and wanted to be a part of it which I do through Eco Volunteering.

What has been a sustainability project that has meant a lot to you?

For an assignment at university we were set with a challenge to change a behavior of ours that would not only better ourselves but also the society in which we live. I chose to give up plastic. I began with the broad goal to give up all plastics… However, it was not until I started recording my plastic consumption that it started to dawn on me how pervasive plastic was in my life! Since I began this journey in 2017, I have learnt and continue to learn about the problem, and various ways in which I can be a part of the solution. I have learnt through personal experience and from the experience and research of others. Over the summer I started a blog called Glasshouse Refillery to share my journey. I also share some of my regular rhythms to living a more sustainable lifestyle on my Instagram and Facebook page – if you’re interested you can find me here: @glasshouserefillery.

I’m also volunteering my time (and my sewing machine!) at the Sustainability Office’s Plastic Free July workshop on Tuesday. Drop in and learn to make (and take home) a produce bag and a beeswax wrap and take a stand against plastic pollution with us! See the Facebook event here for all the details.

What is something that has made you feel really proud and a part of UC? 

I often bike to university and leading up to UC Sustainability’s Bike Breakfast event the bike shed was so full I had to go to one on the other side of campus! While the bike shed isn’t always full (particularly in winter!), it is great to see so many students and staff choosing to cycle to university. I am also proud to be a part of UC Sustainability’s journey in their BYO cups and containers initiative (and the cup library) at the various cafes and food establishments on campus.

Where to next for you?

Though I will soon finish my studies and no longer be a student, I will continue to do my bit for this wonderful planet that we are blessed to live on. I still have a long road ahead on my sustainability journey, but I will endeavor to be an eco-advocate where my life leads me. Endeavoring to encourage others and myself to continue to make small changes that have a big impact.

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on Facebook, Instagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This blog is part of our Sustainability Champions Campaign, where we profile UC students and staff doing great things for sustainability. This is part of our wider communications plan for the 2019 UC Sustainability Awards. For more information, and for the Awards nomination form, see our website.

 

Our Land and Water Symposium | Kia Mauri Ora te Whenua

Can we pick Aotearoa New Zealand’s next billion-dollar food and fibre industries? How can scientists help landowners diversify farming systems to better suit their land? How do we harness the power of collaboration to build trust and make better decisions?

If you are passionate about the environment (and planning a trip to Wellington in mid-August), why not head along to the Our Land and Water Symposium | Kia Mauri Ora te Whenua at Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington, 12 and 13 August 2019.

This year’s Our Land and Water Symposium will showcase research completed as part of its first three years, drawing in social, cultural, environmental and political contexts to generate new ideas and inspiration. For researchers, it’s a great opportunity to connect with, and ask questions of, other researchers and industry leaders, share your ideas, and make connections between people and ideas.

Be part of the solution, alongside people working to restore our land and water from within regional councils, universities and CRIs, industry bodies, NGOs, on farms and within iwi, hapū and businesses.

Early Bird tickets are just $119 for two days (including kai!) and are on sale until 21 July – get yours today.

For more information, head to  https://ourlandandwater.nz/olw2019