Tag Archives: Excel

Press Tab When Filling In Forms

When you’re filling in an online form and you’re moving your cursor from one field to the next as you enter information such as your name, address, and so on, don’t use your mouse to get the cursor from field to field –

JUST PRESS TAB!

Fill in a field, then press the Tab key: the cursor will move to the next field. Fill in that field, and press Tab again: again the cursor will move to the next field.

Try it. You’ll be amazed at how much this simplifies the laborious task of filling in online forms. This works for most other programs too. (But sadly not all.)

You can also use the Tab key in Excel to move from cell to cell, or in Word tables to move from cell to cell.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Finding Commands or Help in Microsoft Office Programs

Do you ever find that you simply cannot find the command you’re looking for in a program? Or need help on how to do something? 

Well, in Microsoft Office programs (such as Outlook, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc) there is an easy solution right within the program.

Within the program (eg, Microsoft Word), at the right hand end of the Ribbon Tabs, there is a field containing the text Tell me what you want to do…

This image shows the Help field in Word

 

  1. Click into the Tell me what you want to do… field
  2. Type in what you wish to do
    – The program will list commands relating to your query
  3. Select an option
    or select Get Help on…

 


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

An Excel Formula to Avoid a #VALUE! Error

If you’re using Excel, this one may be for you.

In M15, you need a formula that multiplies quantity (in, let’s say,  K15) by price (in, let’s say,  L15), but the price column also contains text entries such as Out of stock.  So the formula K15*L15 is not satisfactory because when you multiply a number by a text value (such as “Out of stock”) you get the #VALUE! error.

You could use an IF function to check for text, but there is a shorter solution.

The N function has a single argument: a value. It returns the value if the value is a number, or 0 if the value is text.

So, in M15, use the formula =K15*N(L15).

Thanks to Able Owl Excel tips for this one.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

When Excel Menu Icons Are Greyed Out

When you’re using Excel, do you ever find that the Ribbon and menu icons are inexplicably greyed out?

This can happen if you are in edit-mode in a cell (the cursor is blinking in a cell, waiting for you to enter something), or you have a dialog box open. It can also happen when you minimise an Excel workbook, then open a different one: if you were editing a cell in the first workbook (or have a dialog box open), you won’t be able to insert or edit anything in the second.

The solution is easy: hit the Esc key on the upper left corner of your keyboard.

Thanks to Able Owl Tips for this one.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Make Compiling a Document Easier

If you are compiling a document from two documents, and you have two monitors (computer screens), this tip will be very useful. They may both be Word documents, or could be emails, PDFs or even a combination of these.

  1. Open both documents and display one on each monitor
    (I like to maximise each one so that it fills the monitor)
  2. Decide which one is the primary document
  3. Drag text from the other document and drop it into place in the primary document.

Two important things to note:
– step 3 above will move the text from one document to the other
– to copy the text from one document to the other, hold down the Ctrl key while you drag and drop the text.

Other tips you may find useful are:
Resize a program window to fit half your screen
View 2 windows on one screen (for twin monitor users)
Four windows on two screens?
View One Word Document in Two Windows


For great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Archive of Tech Tips
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.