Tag Archives: Health and safety

Health & Safety Training Courses 2019

The 2019 H&S Training Schedule has been finalised and enrolments are now open for the H&S Core Training.

  • Comprehensive First Aid (Unit Standards 06400, 06401, 06402)  – If your role requires that you have First Aid Certification please enrol onto this course. Enrolments for General First Aiders are reviewed, and approved based on the level of cover per area. If you have several First Aiders in your area your enrolment may not be approved.
  • First Aid Revalidation – If you are a First Aid Certificate holder please check you expiry date (can be found here), and book onto a corresponding Revalidation course. You have 3 months from the expiry of your certificate to revalidate, otherwise you will need to take the 2 day Comprehensive course. 
  • Field Activities Training – If your role requires you be a Field Activity Leader or Deputy Leader, you will need ensure that you have attended the Field Activity Training.  If you have not attended the training in over 2 years, now would be a good time to refresh your training. Should anything happen on any Field Trip that you are leading the investigators will be looking at your training record to ensure that you have met your obligations.
  • Fire Extinguisher and Evacuation Training – This course is relevant to all staff, particularly named Building and Floor wardens, but as important to any staff who work in areas that are ‘First to Armband’ such as teaching spaces. It is facilitated by Fire Fighting Pacific, and includes a practical Fire Extinguisher use, which increases your confidence to pick up an extinguisher and use it to clear your exit if needed.
  • Risk Management – This course should be attended by all staff who identify, control, and monitor hazards and risks in their area of work (that is possibly everyone).
  • Health and Safety Rep Training – Please contact Angie Willington for information relating to your H&S Rep training.

Please discuss your training requirements with your manager and complete any enrolments via UCPeople.

If you have any questions regarding enrolling in a course please contact learningdevelopment@canterbury.ac.nz, or phone Marjorie Blake.

Prevention of Harassment and Bullying Policy

UC’s Harassment Policy has recently been revised and is now called the Prevention of Harassment and Bullying Policy.

UC is committed to providing a harassment-free and bullying-free environment where all people are treated with respect and dignity and can contribute and participate to their full potential.

The UC community is encouraged to familiarise themselves with the revised policy via the UC Policy Library.

Animals on Campus Policy – what you need to know

Following careful consideration of concerns relating to the presence of dogs in UC buildings, a decision was made to establish an Animals on Campus Policy which allows animals on campus if restrained, and restricts access to animals in UC buildings except for exceptional circumstances that have been approved by the Vice-Chancellor.

The starting point for the policy was to consider the health and safety of all staff and students, including phobias and allergies triggered by the close proximity of animals. All staff should have the right to a safe and healthy working environment.

Since the policy was announced, the Vice-Chancellor has received a total of nine requests to allow ten animals into buildings. In two of these occasions, medical evidence was provided explaining the animal concerned supported the wellbeing of a staff member.

The general argument from these requests is that the animal concerned (mainly but not exclusively dogs) has regularly come into UC buildings, in some cases for a number of years, and it would be inconvenient if a past practice was not allowed to continue. The requests assert that these animals have never caused a problem and in some cases, written support has also been provided by colleagues in close proximity to the animal concerned.

No requests have been made for a certified support animal, such as a seeing eye dog, or a dog to support the hearing impaired etc.  

The Vice-Chancellor concluded that a strict interpretation of the policy is the only way to ensure consistent and fair treatment and therefore advised all applicants that they were no longer able to bring their animals into UC buildings.

He did however offer a transition period, strictly for those that had already submitted an exemption request, which will end on 31 December 2018. Staff were strongly encouraged to contact their HR Advisor for other ways UC can provide support with emotional health and wellbeing.

For more, please refer to the Animals on Campus Policy, now available from the Policy Library>

Supporting FAQs:

  1. Why is there a need for this policy?
    To ensure we meet our obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act and to provide a framework for balancing the needs and wellbeing of all people on campus.
  2. Who is liable if an animal on campus injures a student, staff member, or another animal: is it the animal’s owner, or the University?
    It is possible that SMT members, Council members and the animal’s owner will all be liable.
  3. Are injuries caused by animals on campus (registered or unregistered) covered by ACC?
    Probably, but that’s for ACC to determine on a case by case basis.
  4. Is it possible to make a case to the Vice-Chancellor for a psychological support animal?
    Possibly, although it is determined on a case by case basis. An individual student or staff member’s preferences and needs will be balanced with those of others on campus, the operational business needs and other matters set out in the policy. If the animal is a disability support dog that is certified by one of the organisations listed in the policy then VC approval will not be required.
  5. If it is possible to make a case for a psychological support animal, will a medical certificate from  a GP, counsellor or psychologist suffice?
    It will be determined on a case by case basis. A clear diagnosis is more compelling than a letter of support from a GP, as most pet owners could suggest their animal provides them with psychological support. Other potential methods of supporting a staff member’s wellbeing will also be taken into account.

Paul O’Flaherty
Executive Director of Human Resources | Kaihautū Matua Pūmanawa Tangata

I braced myself for the impact…

Earlier this year, second year student Victoria was in a hurry to get to a lecture on time – she knew she was cutting it fine. Here she talks about why she didn’t make it to the lecture at all…

The lecture was about to start and I knew how long it would take me to bike to Ilam campus from Avonhead. I biked past Dovedale campus and then along Ilam Fields. As I got to the Ilam Road crossing I saw a car coming, which I thought would stop for the crossing. I slowed but didn’t stop and entered the crossing.

Pretty much as soon as I entered the crossing I knew the car hadn’t slowed down enough to stop. I was the only one on the crossing and I remember the car vividly, it was coming towards me and it was getting so close, freakishly close. I knew the car was going to hit me.

The impact
I don’t really remember the car hitting me, but I remember lying on my back on the ground and feeling my legs tingling and an odd sensation. I felt extremely winded and could feel pressure on my left side. Security staff told me later that I had jammed on my brakes, put my foot down and I braced myself for the impact.

I was hit on the crossing but landed a few metres away on the road. I was just taken along with the car as it was moving. I was wearing my helmet – so glad that I did. A whole chunk of it broke off. The ambulance guys told me if I hadn’t been wearing it, I would have been knocked out.

It happened so quickly – in a couple of seconds. I was lucky there wasn’t a car coming from the other direction. I just lay on the ground for a couple of minutes afterwards and closed my eyes – possibly in denial! I think I was in shock. I think the driver who hit me was in shock too.

The aftermath  
Heaps of people came to help me, and the security team were really fast at calling an ambulance and getting all my stuff together.

I had bruising on my ribs from where the car hit me, and bruises and cuts from the road on my legs – I was lucky. Because I was on a bike I was elevated, if I was a pedestrian I would have been bowled over.

I sent a text to my friend afterwards and told her what had happened. As you can imagine I got a quick reply. She took me home – driving very cautiously! I never did get to the lecture. 

My ribs took the longest to heal, they took most of the impact and were quite uncomfortable for a while. I think it took me a week to understand everything that had happened.

Think first
I’m definitely more cautious now and a lot more aware of what’s happening around me. I don’t take the same risks, it’s just not worth it – it’s better to be a couple of minutes late and to get there safely in one piece.

If you do take a risk you’re putting yourself and other people in a vulnerable position. You’ve got to put yourself in the other person’s shoes. Imagine being the driver, they don’t want to hit a cyclist or pedestrian just as much as you don’t want to be hit.  

Below: the damage to Victoria’s bike helmet. 

Construction work near Health Centre/UCSA site

Construction work on a new sub-station is under way near the Health Centre/UCSA site. The sub-station will service buildings in the area.

Temporary fencing is in place around the work site. Two car parks will be unavailable during the work to allow construction vehicle access.

Please follow any detours and signage in place around the work area. Take care when travelling through the area and look out for others.

Kia mataara. Think first.