Tag Archives: IT tips

If Your Macrons Stop Working

From time to time I find my macrons suddenly stop working.
This is almost certainly because I have accidentally hit the Windows key + space bar, which is the shortcut to switch the keyboard input method from the Māori keyboard that I usually use, back to the US keyboard.

To correct this:
Press Windows key + space bar to switch it back
or…

1. Click the keyboard input language button, located at the far right end of your taskbar (in the bottom right corner of your monitor/screen).
It looks like this:

 

 

2. Then click English (New Zealand) Maori keyboard.

To use Macrons, see my Tech Tip Type Using Macrons.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Are you sending emails to yourself?

We all do it. An idea for later. Something we must remember to do. Some ideas relating to a project.

For example, say you have an Outlook email folder containing email relating to a particular thing you are working on, and you’d like to save some thoughts of your own in the same folder…. So you send yourself an email containing those thoughts, which you then save in that work folder. Sound familiar?

There is a better way!
It is called
Post In This Folder, and it is a button in Outlook Mail.

To use Post In This Folder in Outlook Mail:

  1. Open the folder in Outlook that you’d like to post the note in
  2. Click the New Items button (at the left end of the Home Ribbon)
  3. Click More Items
  4. Click Post In This Folder
    – a blank note “page”  appears
  5. Add a subject line
  6. Write any notes you’d like to record
  7. Click the Post button

NOTE: if you use this button a lot, pin it to the Quick Access Toolbar so that you can access it quickly.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Non-technical social engineering scam

Social engineering as a scam can take many different forms. One of these is a non-technical form where a scammer already knows enough about you to make you feel comfortable and confident in revealing more personal information that they really need to defraud you.

This is known as ‘pretexting’ or ‘vishing’ voice-phishing, where the scammer is phishing for information using voice communication like a phone call. The caller uses information about you they already know, which could be pieced together from your social media accounts or if you have lost or had your wallet stolen, they will present themselves as someone trustworthy like a representative from your bank.

A good example of this could be if you have lost your wallet. A scammer might find a shop receipt in your lost wallet and call you posing as a shop attendant. To get more information out of you they might say you have won a voucher and simply need you to provide a PIN number to activate the card. Unfortunately, most people will provide a PIN number they already use. The caller now has your wallet, bank cards, ID cards and a PIN number they can use to try and defraud you.

What to do if you receive a suspicious call

Think about the information you are being asked for:

  • is what the person is saying believable?
  • why do they need this information?
  • are they making a reasonable request for this purpose?
  • is this person who they say they are?

It is ok to say no and ask them to verify who they are. If you are not sure of the credibility of the person you are speaking to hang-up and call the organisation yourself. Don’t call any phone numbers the caller gives you either over the phone or in email, look up a phone number for the organisation on their website.

Find information on how to report a cyber security incident at UC here>

Save Travel Time for Meetings

Some fresh air is great, but you don’t always have the time to travel to and from a meeting. There is an alternative.

Did you know that you can meet with your colleagues around the University, from your desk, using the teleconferencing and video conferencing* features on your computer?
(*video conferencing is available if you have a camera on your computer)

In Microsoft Outlook Calendar:

  1. Click New Skype Meeting on the Home ribbonNew Skype Meeting button
  2. Add your participants (as you would normally add recipients to an email) so that each recipient will receive an invitationNew Skype Meeting Invitation with invitees
    You’ll notice in the body of the meeting there is a link to Join Skype Meeting.
  3. Complete the other details of the meeting and Send the invitation as you normally would.
  4. When the meeting time is due: you, and each participant, click Join Skype Meeting and a conference between you and all the
    participants will be formed.

You can also use this feature for external meetings – eg, with people external to UC – even if they don’t have Skype!

For other ways to make the most of your Skype for Business tools, see these other Skype for Business Basic Tasks.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Recover Closed Browser Tabs

Sometimes I intend to only close one browser tab but accidentally close the browser itself, thus closing all the tabs. It’s one of those “oh bugger!” moments.

The good news is that there’s a solution, and it is Ctrl-Shift-T.

Open the browser again and press Ctrl-Shift-T, and all your previous tabs will reopen.

This also usually works after a system reboot. You know: you come into work and discover your system has rebooted itself overnight, and all those browser tabs you had open are gone…


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.