Tag Archives: law

Free legal advice on Campus

Wednesday 5 and 12 October 2016

  • The UC Law Clinic, in association with Community Law Canterbury (CLC), is offering a free legal advice service to on any issue, including flatting, tenancy and rental problems.
  • This confidential service, under the supervision of a qualified and practising CLC solicitor, will be available on selected Wednesday afternoons from 2pm to 5pm.
  • Appointments may be made for the time-slots of 2 pm, 3 pm, or 4pm on any of the following Wednesdays: 5 and 12 October 2016. The venue is Room 151A in the foyer of the Business and Law Building in University Drive.

Please e-mail your preferred appointment day and time to: law-clinic@canterbury.ac.nz and a confirmatory email will be sent in reply.

Professor Robin Palmer,

Director of Clinical Legal Studies, UC School of Law.

Junk Science or Forensic Breakthrough?

UClAw

School of Law Seminar Series

An overview of the UC Law Forensic Brainwave Analysis Project

Date:             Thursday 6 October 2016

Time:             12.30 – 1.30pm (followed by light lunch at 1.30pm)

Venue:         Staff Common Room, Level 2 – Business & Law Build

The central aim of the NZLF-funded ‘The Brain does not Lie’ forensic brainwave analysis proposed project is to attempt to validate the forensic application of brain-wave technology, pioneered by Dr Larry Farwell in the USA, and to investigate ancillary issues such as ethics, investigation procedures, cultural impacts and privacy concerns.

The forensic brain-wave technology is designed to detect knowledge of information contained in the brain by reading and analyzing the event-related potentials (brainwaves) of tested subjects in response to visual or auditory ‘probes’. It is not a lie detector, but the proof of knowledge may lead to inferences of guilt or participation.

Professor Robin Palmer is a Professor of Law and Director of Clinical Legal Studies at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Prior to that he was the director of the Institute for Professional Legal Training (IPLT), which is affiliated to the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa, and the director of its post-graduate forensic Investigation programme. He is also a practicing barrister who has been involved in numerous high-profile cases. He is the author of the chapters on new forensic technologies in Principles of the Law of Evidence (Oxford University Press [SA], 2013), and the project leader of the NZLF-funded ‘The Brain does not Lie’ forensic brainwave analysis project.

Professor Richard Jones is attached to the NZ Brain Research Institute in Christchurch. He is Director of the Christchurch Neurotechnology Research Programme; a biomedical engineer and neuroscientist in the Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering of the Canterbury District Health Board; a Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Communication Disorders, and Psychology at the University of Canterbury, and a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine at the Christchurch School of Medicine & Health Sciences of the University of Otago. He is a member of the team involved in the NZLF-funded ‘The Brain does not Lie’ forensic brainwave analysis project. 

Date:             Thursday 6 October 2016

Time:             12.30 – 1.30pm (followed by light lunch at 1.30pm)

Venue:         Staff Common Room, Level 2 – Business & Law Building

 

 

UC Students win family moot

Family moot winners
In early August, two UC law students, James Anson-Holland and Jennifer Smith, won the Mahoney Cup on the 20th anniversary of the national family mooting competition.

UC has won the cup seven times in the history of the competition, meaning UC has won more times than any other Law School – with Otago running a close second with six wins.

This year’s Moot was on an issue of child abduction, a topic which our two mooters described as “engaging”.

James and Jennifer said that while the Moot itself was very competitive, everything else had been really friendly, with a highlight being a dinner hosted by the Dean of the Otago Law School. Both mooters valued the personalised feedback from the judges and are “overjoyed” to have brought the trophy back to Canterbury.

Free on-campus legal advice for staff and students

The UC Law Clinic, in association with Community Law Canterbury (CLC), is offering a free legal advice service to staff and students of the University, and their families – on any topic.

This confidential service, under the supervision of a qualified and practicing CLC solicitor, will be available on selected Wednesday afternoons from 2pm to 5pm. Appointments may be made for the time-slots of 2pm, 3pm, or 4pm on any of the following Wednesdays: 19 August; 9, 16, 23 and 30 September and 7 October 2015. The venue is Room 155A in the foyer of the Business and Law Building in University Drive.

Please email your preferred appointment day and time to the law clinic and a confirmation email will be sent in reply. If you have any queries, please email Professor Robin Palmer or call him on ext. 8818.