Tag Archives: Leadership

Blue CLUES/Weaving the Rope: Courage in Challenging Times

Blue CLUES/Weaving the Rope: Courage in Challenging Times
Wed 24 June 10am-11.30am

Join a 90 minute virtual session that is relevant for all staff in our response to the current Covid-19 situation and beyond.
Register here> 

Who is this for? All UC Staff!
People at all stages in their leadership journey that want to learn more about the four skill sets of courage: defining leadership and how to navigate vulnerability; leading with values; building trust; rising from setbacks. 

Link to Organisational Culture:
Part of being constructive is about being courageous and having courageous conversations. If we can build capability around how to be courageous and provide an environment where this is encouraged then it will help shift us closer to our ideal organisational culture.

Overview:
Courageous leadership has never been more vital than it is now
In this session, Kaila will draw on her training with the Dare to Lead™ curriculum, as well as her own extensive leadership experience, to share evidence-based leadership skills most relevant to the challenges posed by our current context.

This experience is for you if:

  • You are wondering what leadership looks like when our environment is uncertain
  • You want to know the key attributes of leaders who successfully deal with significant challenges
  • You are tasked with keeping people focused and moving forward even if you don’t know what direction to go in
  • You want to understand what it means to be a courageous leader in the face of sudden and dramatic disruption
  • You need your team and your organisation to be braver and more resilient than ever before

About Kaila Colbin:
Kaila is co-founder of Boma Global and CEO of Boma New Zealand.

She spearheaded the hugely successful SingularityU New Zealand and Australia Summits, introducing more than 2,500 people to exponential technologies and their impact on humanity. She trained with Brené Brown and is a Certified Dare To Lead™ Facilitator. She is also a co-founder and trustee of the non-profit Ministry of Awesome and a Director of CORE Education. Her purpose in life is to be an uplifting presence.

Register to attend the virtual session here> 

UC Careers’ Annual Event Empowering Women

Become a leader by empowering women (and yourself)

UC Careers’ annual event empowering women is back! This year we explore a valuable 21st century skill that’s important for all women to develop. The theme of the event is focused on ‘what do women bring to leadership?’ The best thing about this event is that it brings both staff and students together, so make sure you save the date: Thursday 1 August, 5-7pm, Rehua 226 Te Moana.   

Our inspirational speakers include:

    • Hannah Duder, CEO, Indigo & Iris
    • Stella Ward, Chief Digital Officer, Canterbury and West Coast DHBs
    • Lan Pham, Councillor, Environment Canterbury Regional Council
    • and our very own VC, Professor Cheryl de la Rey

You can RSVP via UC Careers today! Also you can spread the word by sharing the event and RSVP on social media.

So what is this event all about, and why should you attend? Besides leadership being an important 21st century skill, we can develop a sense of fulfillment through recognizing our own leadership skills and attributes, it’s a way of empowering others, and making a positive impact by shaping the world in which we live.

UC Careers’ Annual Event Empowering Women

UC Careers’ annual event overview, highlights questions and various calls to action that the guest speakers will cover:  

Have you thought about what women bring to leadership? Let’s pause and recognize leadership skills and attributes within ourselves and others, and the value of these. Also let’s think about how these can be leveraged to develop and demonstrate leadership.

How would you define leadership? Or have you thought about the meaning women attach to the word leadership? We aim to broaden what we know leadership to be, and celebrate how we can all demonstrate leadership, no matter what opportunities we choose to pursue.

Let’s overcome real/perceived barriers! Sometimes women are held back. What’s stopping women from reaching higher, from taking the lead, and breaking through to the top? We want to break down the barriers holding women back from leadership experiences, so make sure you come and hear the advice these inspirational speakers are keen to share.

Lastly, let’s gather some words of wisdom. A few words and actions can make a big difference. Hear words of wisdom from our guest speakers to support women to embrace leadership.

Remember – Become a leader by empowering women (and yourself)!

RSVP via UC Careers today!    

Also you can spread the word: Share the event and RSVP on social media.

We are all in this together – Whiria te Taura Tangata #14

Kia ora koutou!

He waka eke noa.

My understanding of this whakataukī is “we are all in this together”.

It uses the waka as a symbol of the need for cooperation and collaboration in order to move together towards a shared place or vision. With the Colleges of Arts and Engineering, and now the UC Health Centre, receiving their culture results we can now truly say this is the case.

Blue CLUES. The planning for the first Blue CLUES is underway and invitations will be sent soon to those in Culture Leadership roles.  The invitation is still open for work areas to host one of these seminars – open the session, contribute to the content etc. so just let me know if you wish to take this opportunity.

Contributions welcome. Contributions to this blog are welcome. If you have a story to share, feel free to talk to me or post it yourself.

Culture Bites Podcasts.The podcasts by Human Synergistics Australia are a useful resource that can be listened to, for example, in the car. The latest one “But in this industry we have to be like that…”  David Byrum and Dominic Gourley from Human Synergistics discuss the concept of different cultures within different industries – “In a University, we have to be Oppositional because …..” You can listen to it here (or download to your phone): But in this Industry we have to be like that…

Change in OD Team. Karen Grant has taken up a new role within HR as Reward and Recognition Consultant. Karen’s contribution to getting the culture development programme to this point has been significant and I thank her for everything she has done. Rachel Dillon, who has worked here as an HR Advisor, is now in the OD Advisor role.  Rachel will be managing the LSI, OCI/OEI, Blue CLUES etc. – so say kia ora.

Finding Out More

Ngā manaakitanga (with best wishes), Karen

Karen Mather
Organisational Development Manager

UC’s Organisational Culture Transformation – update #3 – Hui Method, Organisational Culture in the news …

Living the four constructive behaviours: How the “Hui Method” supports our desired organisational culture

Thinking of things cultural, this is a shout-out for engagement with the staff professional development opportunity Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora. I refreshed my knowledge last week – along with a group of nineteen engaged academic and general staff from across UC. This reminded me of the inclusive practices that are exemplified in the “Hui Method” (aka The Mihi Method) which is modelled in the programme.

This process developed out of research at the University of Otago contains four key elements:
1. Mihi – initial greeting and engagement
2. Whakawhanaungatanga – making a connection
3. Kaupapa – attending to the main purpose of the encounter and
4. Poroporoaki – concluding the encounter and ensuring clarity about the next steps.

The facilitators Ripeka and Abby encouraged us to consider the use of this method for a number of situations. Examples we discussed included: an inclusive way of teaching in both large and small group settings, use in other student interactions, and how this could positively change the format of meetings. The concept appeared to resonate for all of us there.

Using the Hui Process will reinforce the constructive behaviours described by Human Synergistics – from both the individual and organisational perspective. Mihi and Whakawhanaungatanga create an environment of participation, trust and commitment. In other words the Humanistic-Encouraging and Affiliative behaviours. Focusing on Kaupapa after the building of engagement and connection fosters Achievement characteristics. The articulation and clarification of agreed next steps reinforce that style. The entire process supports Self-Actualisation as this is about personal growth and development, about expanding experiences, and gaining fulfilment from doing a job well.

The Hui Method was developed in an educational health setting and seems to me to be a helpful way to support our bicultural aspirations, while helping us to model the operational culture we have described as desirable. See the Tangata tū, tangata ora website to register.

“The current consensus from Māori health leaders, student feedback and anecdotal Māori patient feedback indicates the ‘Hui Process’ is easily learnt, well received by patients and can enhance the doctor–patient relationship”.

Lacey, Cameron & Huria, Tania & Beckert, Lutz & Gilles, Matea & Pitama, Suzanne. (2011). The Hui Process: A framework to enhance the doctor-patient relationship with Māori. The New Zealand medical journal. 124. 72-8.

If you are an academic staff member and you want to further reflect on your own practice, make connections and identify potential opportunities to embed culturally responsive pedagogy see Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: From Theory to Practice.

Feature Articles – organisational culture in the news
I’ve been seeing and hearing a lot about Organisational Culture in the news (and I don’t believe it is just frequency illusion!) People seem to be more aware of the impact of workplace culture on their practices, services, staff wellbeing and organisational success. Below are some examples. I am keen for some that show impact from a more positive aspect – send me any you find.

1. Should we steer clear of the winner-takes-all approach? Researchers reflect on an initiative in New Zealand to make science more inclusive. (Nature, International Journal of Science)

“At a time of great global divisiveness, moves are afoot to make the research culture more welcoming, respectful and responsible …. The winner-takes-all model is not the only way to make big breakthroughs in research ….”.

2. Interview with Deloitte’s forensic director Lorinda Kelly (audio): “New Zealand least corrupt in the world” (Radio NZ The Panel)

“… sub-culture … it was OK to be doing the things they were doing and it was the way everybody was behaving in that small group … corrupt culture that enabled the behaviour to carry on…”

3. “EQC culture change is long overdue” (Stuff editorial)

“….EQC seemed increasingly like a throwback to the bad old days of tight-lipped, defensive organisations that did not always seem to have local interests at heart”.

Finding Out More
– See UC’s Culture Journey website for more information on the UC programme, tools, articles and whitepapers, FAQs and more.
– Share your good news stories about culture change. Snippet of news? Use the short format. More reflective story to tell? Use the slightly longer format (suitable for Culture Leaders).
– Previous blog – Blog #2.

Ngā mihi nui
Karen Mather
Organisational Development Manager