Tag Archives: Learning and Development

Configuring Out of Office Reply for a Shared Mailbox

Do you manage a shared mailbox in Microsoft Outlook?

Now that it’s Christmas and you may be thinking about switching on Automatic Replies (Out of Office), doing so for a shared mailbox can be a real battle. Christmas is all about The Good News and there’s good news here too: there is an easy way to do this.

The easiest way to switch on Automatic Replies (Out of Office) for a shared mailbox is to do so through Outlook Web App.

This is actually pretty quick and straight forward, so don’t be put off by all the steps in the instructions below. Just forge on!

  1. Log in to Outlook Web App (OWA)
    – by following these steps
    – or by clicking this link

Now you are logged in to OWA, all you need to do is access the shared mailbox and switch on Out of Office.

2. Access the shared mailbox
Click your name in the upper-right corner of the OWA window
(a dialogue box appears titled Open Other Mailbox)
    –
Enter the name of the shared mailbox you’d like to add the Out of Office reply to, then click Open (the shared mailbox opens)

3. Switch on Out of Office
Click options in the upper-right corner (just below where your name was before you opened the shared mailbox)
Click set automatic replies
Set up your Automatic Reply, ensuring you consider replies to senders inside the organisation and outside the organisation
(to get started, click the radio button titled Send automatic replies)
– you can set an automatic start and end date/time if required
Click Save in the lower-right corner (it has a green tick next to it).
When you are finished, click sign out  in the upper-right corner.

If you have a Tech Tip suggestion, please let me know.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Use Ctrl+F to Search Webpages and Documents

If you are searching for something on a webpage, in a PDF, a Word document, a PowerPoint presentation, or many other digital formats, this is a really quick way to make your task easier:

CTRL+F

Hold down the Ctrl key on your keyboard and press the F key. This activates the Find function.

Different programs behave differently in exactly how this is displayed but, after you have pressed Ctrl+F, look around the top, sides or bottom of the program window and you will usually see a box in which you type in the word or phrase you are searching for. (You don’t have to click into the box, just press Ctrl+F and start typing your word or phrase, and then press Enter).

Next to the Search box is then usually displayed the number of times the result has been found. Often, each occurrence of the word or phrase is highlighted too. You can then tap the Enter key to move through each result one by one, or click the next or previous arrows which are often a feature of a Search box. In some programs such as Word and Acrobat the entire sentence is displayed and you can click the sentence to be taken to that page.

Thanks again to Shannon Miller for this Tech Tip suggestion.
If you have one, please let me know.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Computer or Device Misbehaving? Restart!

Yes, it’s boring advice, I know. But more and more these days I find that the solution to weird things happening on my computer or phone or tablet – things just not working right – is to restart.

Switch it off, count to 20*, and switch it back on.

(*Some devices hold their memory for a few seconds, so count to 20 while it’s switched off, and practice some mindfulness while you’re at it.)

Thanks to Shannon Miller for this Tech Tip suggestion!
If you have one, please let me know.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Excel – Add Cells While Ignoring Hidden Cells

This is a way to add up the contents of cells, while ignoring hidden cells, eg, if you’ve filtered a list, and need to add up the contents of a column of visible cells. (Because just using SUM would not work because it would also include the hidden cells.)

 So, to do this…

Say that you want to add the numbers in cells A1, A2, A3 and A4. You can do so with the formula =sum (A1:A4). However, you only want to use that formula if those cells are not hidden (to hide and unhide rows and columns, go to Home | Cells | Format | Hide & Unhide).

Instead, (in this example) use the formula =SUBTOTAL(109, A1:A4).

The SUBTOTAL function can add, subtract or average numbers, among other calculations. The first argument tells SUBTOTAL what kind of calculation to perform. 9 means sum. 109 means “sum, but ignore hidden cells”. The following arguments are the cells, ranges or numbers to sum. So this formula is like =sum (A1:A4), but any hidden cells in that range are ignored.

Thanks to Able Owl Excel tips for this one.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

PLAYING TO YOUR STRENGTHS – WHIRIA TE TAURA TANGATA #11

Team Management Profile

To encourage interactions at the group level across UC we have piloted the Team Management Profile (TMP) throughout 2018.  Close to 300 staff having taken the strengths-based self-assessment survey and then participated in a variety of workshops to debrief the results.

In addition to providing individual feedback on areas for development, the tool allows us to understand the working preferences of our colleagues.  This in turn is helping UC staff to overcome barriers that may have existed, and is leading to improved working relationships and performance.

Feedback has been positive from people who have used the tool, with many saying how fun and interactive the workshops are.

Some other comments received include:

“I used the TMP pacing tool before our first meeting and I felt it really made a difference.  Our communication style matched what it predicted, and I felt we achieved more in the meeting.”

“My Team have commented that they found it really interesting as well as fun.  They have all commented on the revelation that everyone in the Team would rather have a conversation about something rather than sending emails.  In just 24 hours I have seen staff being much freer in communicating face to face as we all now understand that this is a communication style that works for all of us.”

“I have had staff express to me how they are excited about being able to focus more on where their strengths lie and how they now have some more insight into how others operate at work.”

“I’ve had two 1:1 meetings with staff today and both staff members were eager to talk about their profiles in terms of what they are learning about themselves and generating ideas about how we could capitalise on the preferred working styles of the whole Team.”

If you are interested in finding out how the TMP could benefit your Research Group/Team/Area please talk to your HR Advisor.

Blue CLUES #4 – Moving Groups from the Red to the Blue

A reminder that our final Blue CLUES sessions for 2018 are being held next week (Tuesday 20 and Wednesday 21 November).  If you would like to come along and have not yet registered, please email organisationaldevelopment@canterbury.ac.nz

Hei konā mai

Karen Grant
Organisational Development Advisor

Whiria te Taura Tangata | Weave the Rope of People – UC’s Organisational Culture Development Programme