Tag Archives: Learning & Development

Turn an Email into a Calendar Appointment

From time to time you might get an email that you’d like to use to form the basis of a calendar appointment. Usually this would be to remind yourself to do something; or if you need to send a meeting invitation to people, to include all the information that is in the email.

To do this, simply drag the email from your Inbox and drop it onto the Calendar icon, in the lower left corner of the Outlook window.

Outlook calendar icon

A calendar appointment is created, displaying the contents of the email in the body of the appointment. You can then add any other information you’d like to, and even invite others to the appointment (or not, if it is just something you want to put into your own calendar), and save or send it as you would any other appointment.

(Thanks to Rebecca Hurrell for this Tech Tip suggestion, and wording!)


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Start A Fresh Page In Word

You are working on a Word document…
you are part-way down the page…
and for one reason or another you wish to end that page there and start a fresh page.

What do you do? No, do not hit the Return key over and over until the cursor moves onto a new page!! This leaves a whole lot of blank lines that will haunt you later when you make formatting changes and add other things to the document.

Instead, press Ctrl + Enter

Or:
1. Click the Insert tab
2. Click Page Break

This gives you a new blank page, and your cursor moves to that page. This is the correct way to get a new page,  for the reasons  I mentioned above.

Note: If you need to remove a Page Break – and you will sooner or later – switch on Paragraph marks so that you can see the Page Breaks in your document and delete any you need to.
The Show Paragrah marks icon

 


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Workshop – Success for Māori in tertiary education

Ako Aotearoa have organised a Christchurch based workshop:
Kia eke ki te taumata – Success for Māori in Tertiary Education

This akomanga workshop is designed for all educators (Māori and non- Māori) who work with Māori learners.

Through reflection, discussion and practical activities, participants will make connections to their own teaching context and explore some of the key findings from studies that investigated:

  • enhancing success rates for Māori learners
  • teaching with the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi
  • understanding Māori learners
  • implementing Kaupapa Māori.

The workshop facilitator will tailor the akomanga to ensure that it meets the needs of participants.


You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Avoidance and Blame – Whiria te Taura Tangata #19

A new initiative  “Weaving The Rope” – a “Blue CLUES” for all staff is coming soon so keep an eye out!

Blue CLUES:  Just over 100 leaders attended the event “Applying ADKAR to Culture Change”. Thank you to Annelies Kamp and Misty Sato (EHHD), Alex Hanlon (LR), Lynn McClelland and Jayne Austin (SSAC) and Wendy Lawson (Science) for their “speed dating” skills in sharing their culture stories. We’ll load materials to the website soon.

Avoidance and blame I had the privilege of hearing some excellent speakers last week. One of them shared a thought-provoking, amusing video which made me think about

“blame culture”.

What does that mean? Most definitions talked about situations where people are reluctant to speak out, take risks, or accept responsibility because they fear criticism, retribution or worse. This shows up in culture results in the passive/defensive cluster particularly as Avoidance – “people are expected to shift responsibilities to others and avoid being blamed for mistakes”. This style impacts all the constructive styles but particularly Achievement and Self-actualised, and it kills innovation.

As Human Synergistics say in their Whitepaper – Organisational Culture: Beyond Employee Engagement (page 24)

“…it’s not about ignoring mistakes, it’s about how the circumstance of the mistake is dealt with. Is the focus on blame or improvement? Are people given help to improve their performance?”

  • What does Avoidance look like on your circumplex?
  • Is it impacting your colleagues and your ability to achieve? Work well together? Innovate?
  • What conversations could you lead or behaviours could you model to reduce Avoidance and blame?
  • Have you seen the overall results? How does yours compare?

I will leave those thoughts with you as well as Dr Brené Brown’s video (3.25mins) to make you laugh (or at least give a wry smile if you recognise a little of yourself in her words).

Ngā manaakitanga with best wishes,

Karen Mather
Organisational Development

When Excel Menu Icons Are Greyed Out

When you’re using Excel, do you ever find that the Ribbon and menu icons are inexplicably greyed out?

This can happen if you are in edit-mode in a cell (the cursor is blinking in a cell, waiting for you to enter something), or you have a dialog box open. It can also happen when you minimise an Excel workbook, then open a different one: if you were editing a cell in the first workbook (or have a dialog box open), you won’t be able to insert or edit anything in the second.

The solution is easy: hit the Esc key on the upper left corner of your keyboard.

Thanks to Able Owl Tips for this one.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.