Tag Archives: Learning & Development

Civility at UC – not to make assumptions

Last week we welcomed to campus visiting academic Professor Michael P Leiter, PhD (U of Oregon) MA (Vanderbilt) BA (Duke), an expert on the psychology of work and Professor of Organisational Psychology at Deakin University.

It was wonderful to see such a great turnout at Michael’s research seminar and the all-staff combined “Weaving the Rope” and “Blue CLUES” sessions. Around 300 people heard him speak at these events.

Michael talked about the importance of workplaces as a community and how belonging is vital. Michael uses the 4A’s a as a model to define civility.

  1. Acknowledge – which can be as simple as saying good morning to each other.
  2. Accept – inviting people to join in.
  3. Appreciate – giving thanks.
  4. Accommodate – inconveniencing yourself a bit to help someone else fit in with the flow of what’s going on.

Michael showed us the importance of intention and intensity of social interaction. Often we don’t know what message was intended, therefore we make assumptions (rightly or wrongly) about the intentions of others.

Michael talked about how his research shows that people tend to see themselves as being more civil than others perceive and that on average people experience a ratio of 5:1 civil to uncivil interactions when at work – which shows there’s a lot of room for improvement. For those who have their own LSI1&2, take a look and see what your results tell you in relation to this.

So what can staff do??

Michael suggested staff recruit a friend or workgroup to start modelling civility with.

What can leaders do??

Michael talked about leaders playing a large role in setting an example and promoting civility and respect and suggested putting civility on the agenda and adopting a sound Problem Solving framework as a good starting point. Check out the Problem Solving methodology UC has adopted.

Link to Organisational Culture

I see strong alignment between what Michael shared with us and the work we are doing to move UC towards our desired culture. For example, our culture survey measures now we feel about:

Respect for Members “The extent to which people are treated in a fair and just manner both in general and with respect to developmental opportunities”.

Empowerment “The extent to which people are given the authority, resources, experience and opportunity to perform their tasks autonomously”.

Use of Rewards, Use of Punishments, Significance, Interdependence – the list goes on….

If we can move these levers for change in a positive way, we can begin operating in a more constructive way which leads to greater Role Clarity, Motivation, Satisfaction and less Stress, which in turn lifts the performance of the individuals and the organisation as a whole.

Team Management Profile (TMP) is another tool we use to enhance team dynamics.

You’ll find Michael’s video and presentation under the Blue CLUES Intranet page and the Weaving the Rope Intranet page

If you would like assistance on how to kick-start a conversation about civility and respect within your team then get in touch with your Manager or HR Advisor. The 4 A’s is a great place to start!

Ngā mihi

Rachel Dillon

OD Advisor

Using Blended Learning to Develop the Optimal Self

The final Canterbury Branch event for the New Zealand Association of Training and Development (NZATD) is titled “Using Blended Learning to Develop the Optimal Self” and is being held at the Ilam Homestead on November 21 from 5.30pm to 7pm.

Please visit the NZATD website to find out more and/or to register. There is a small fee of $5.00 for UC staff to attend.

Press Tab When Filling In Forms

When you’re filling in an online form and you’re moving your cursor from one field to the next as you enter information such as your name, address, and so on, don’t use your mouse to get the cursor from field to field –

JUST PRESS TAB!

Fill in a field, then press the Tab key: the cursor will move to the next field. Fill in that field, and press Tab again: again the cursor will move to the next field.

Try it. You’ll be amazed at how much this simplifies the laborious task of filling in online forms. This works for most other programs too. (But sadly not all.)

You can also use the Tab key in Excel to move from cell to cell, or in Word tables to move from cell to cell.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Finding Commands or Help in Microsoft Office Programs

Do you ever find that you simply cannot find the command you’re looking for in a program? Or need help on how to do something? 

Well, in Microsoft Office programs (such as Outlook, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc) there is an easy solution right within the program.

Within the program (eg, Microsoft Word), at the right hand end of the Ribbon Tabs, there is a field containing the text Tell me what you want to do…

This image shows the Help field in Word

 

  1. Click into the Tell me what you want to do… field
  2. Type in what you wish to do
    – The program will list commands relating to your query
  3. Select an option
    or select Get Help on…

 


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

An Excel Formula to Avoid a #VALUE! Error

If you’re using Excel, this one may be for you.

In M15, you need a formula that multiplies quantity (in, let’s say,  K15) by price (in, let’s say,  L15), but the price column also contains text entries such as Out of stock.  So the formula K15*L15 is not satisfactory because when you multiply a number by a text value (such as “Out of stock”) you get the #VALUE! error.

You could use an IF function to check for text, but there is a shorter solution.

The N function has a single argument: a value. It returns the value if the value is a number, or 0 if the value is text.

So, in M15, use the formula =K15*N(L15).

Thanks to Able Owl Excel tips for this one.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.