Tag Archives: Learning & Development

Computer or Device Misbehaving? Restart!

Yes, it’s boring advice, I know. But more and more these days I find that the solution to weird things happening on my computer or phone or tablet – things just not working right – is to restart.

Switch it off, count to 20*, and switch it back on.

(*Some devices hold their memory for a few seconds, so count to 20 while it’s switched off, and practice some mindfulness while you’re at it.)

Thanks to Shannon Miller for this Tech Tip suggestion!
If you have one, please let me know.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Excel – Add Cells While Ignoring Hidden Cells

This is a way to add up the contents of cells, while ignoring hidden cells, eg, if you’ve filtered a list, and need to add up the contents of a column of visible cells. (Because just using SUM would not work because it would also include the hidden cells.)

 So, to do this…

Say that you want to add the numbers in cells A1, A2, A3 and A4. You can do so with the formula =sum (A1:A4). However, you only want to use that formula if those cells are not hidden (to hide and unhide rows and columns, go to Home | Cells | Format | Hide & Unhide).

Instead, (in this example) use the formula =SUBTOTAL(109, A1:A4).

The SUBTOTAL function can add, subtract or average numbers, among other calculations. The first argument tells SUBTOTAL what kind of calculation to perform. 9 means sum. 109 means “sum, but ignore hidden cells”. The following arguments are the cells, ranges or numbers to sum. So this formula is like =sum (A1:A4), but any hidden cells in that range are ignored.

Thanks to Able Owl Excel tips for this one.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

PLAYING TO YOUR STRENGTHS – WHIRIA TE TAURA TANGATA #11

Team Management Profile

To encourage interactions at the group level across UC we have piloted the Team Management Profile (TMP) throughout 2018.  Close to 300 staff having taken the strengths-based self-assessment survey and then participated in a variety of workshops to debrief the results.

In addition to providing individual feedback on areas for development, the tool allows us to understand the working preferences of our colleagues.  This in turn is helping UC staff to overcome barriers that may have existed, and is leading to improved working relationships and performance.

Feedback has been positive from people who have used the tool, with many saying how fun and interactive the workshops are.

Some other comments received include:

“I used the TMP pacing tool before our first meeting and I felt it really made a difference.  Our communication style matched what it predicted, and I felt we achieved more in the meeting.”

“My Team have commented that they found it really interesting as well as fun.  They have all commented on the revelation that everyone in the Team would rather have a conversation about something rather than sending emails.  In just 24 hours I have seen staff being much freer in communicating face to face as we all now understand that this is a communication style that works for all of us.”

“I have had staff express to me how they are excited about being able to focus more on where their strengths lie and how they now have some more insight into how others operate at work.”

“I’ve had two 1:1 meetings with staff today and both staff members were eager to talk about their profiles in terms of what they are learning about themselves and generating ideas about how we could capitalise on the preferred working styles of the whole Team.”

If you are interested in finding out how the TMP could benefit your Research Group/Team/Area please talk to your HR Advisor.

Blue CLUES #4 – Moving Groups from the Red to the Blue

A reminder that our final Blue CLUES sessions for 2018 are being held next week (Tuesday 20 and Wednesday 21 November).  If you would like to come along and have not yet registered, please email organisationaldevelopment@canterbury.ac.nz

Hei konā mai

Karen Grant
Organisational Development Advisor

Whiria te Taura Tangata | Weave the Rope of People – UC’s Organisational Culture Development Programme

Who do you forward a phishing email to?

We have an email address to send phishing scams to.
However you need to do it in a particular way:

  1. Create a new email message, addressed to report-phishing@canterbury.ac.nz
  2. Drag the phishing email from your email Inbox and drop it onto the new email message. This adds the phishing email as an attachment to the new email message – this is an important step because ITS need the internet header of the scam email.

You might be wondering why you can’t just forward the phishing email? By attaching the email you ensure that the phishing email’s sender header information is included too, and ITS need that information.

Further reading:


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Professional development – putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga

John Kapa, Kapoipoi, Student Development Advisor Māori  explains the significance of putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga, including an opportunity for professional development. 

Putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga – Wednesday 14 November, 1.30pm-3.30pm

This is a workshop co-ordinated by the Professional Learning Community of in-house trainers.
Places are limited – if you would like to attend, please contact the Learning & Development team requesting an invitation (with the location) to be sent to you.

Relationships are important. The idea of AU (I) is more than being individualistic, rather it is also the strength of connection and working as a collective found in whakawhanAUngatanga. Whakawhanaungatanga is the act of and is the process of establishing links, making connections and relating to the people one meets by identifying in culturally appropriate ways, whakapapa linkages, past heritages, points of engagement, or other relationships.

In a metaphoric sense, Mead (2003) asserts that whanaungatanga reaches beyond actual whakapapa relationships and includes relationships to people who are not kin but who, through shared experiences, feel and act as kin.

Exploring this further, this session looks at your self-identified attributes around whanaungatanga to identify touch points and how this could be applied positively at work with peers or with ākonga (students) for example. This will be undertaken through exercises and pūrakau (stories).

 


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.