Tag Archives: Māori at UC

Māpura Māori – Reo Māori in a minute!

Māpura means fire, flash or spark

Delivered to your email inbox each fortnight Te Waka Pākākano | Office of the AVC Māori, Pacific and Equity will provide a small video clip called Māpura Māori – Reo Māori in a minute –  a short, informal pronunciation lesson to assist you with the correct pronunciation of some of our UC events, publications, programmes, places and spaces.

Māpura Māori is designed to both spark your motivation and provide you with a better understanding of the meaning behind many of these names and phrases – so that you build your bicultural competence and confidence while giving reo a go!

Kia iti te kupu, kia nui te whakaaro – capitalising on the micro-moments of opportunity that are available in our busy days, we have set ourselves a challenge – to provide you with a snippet of support via a video clip, in only 90 seconds or less. You will also find a link to an audio file so that you are able to click, listen, learn and let your ārero (tongue) practice the pronunciation in the privacy of your own home or office space.

Kia kaha tatou ki te tū ki te tahi – kia kaha tō tatou reo Māori!

Tū ki te tahi means to ‘stand as one’.

Click below to listen and practice your pronunciation for “Tū ki te tahi”.

Tū ki te tahi is an excerpt taken from the Ngāi Tahu whakataukī: “Whakahaua tō iwi, kia tū ki te tahi” which translates to ‘encourage your people to stand as one’.

In naming our staff pānui Tū ki te tahi, we acknowledge this fortnightly email as an opportunity for us all as UC whānau to engage and be empowered by the information shared so that we increase our knowledge on how to continue making a difference in our community, locally and globally – tangata tū, tangata ora.

Te Waka Pākākano – new name for Office of the AVC Māori, Pacific & Equity

We are pleased to announce the name of the Māori, Pacific and Equity portfolio, led by Dr Darryn Russell.  Formerly known as the Office of the AVC Māori it now includes a focus on Māori, peoples of the Pacific and equity, diversity and inclusiveness.

The new names for the unit, and for the AVC position are:

Te Waka Pākākano | Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori, Pacific and Equity

Te Amokapua Pākākano | Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori, Pacific and Equity

The narrative of the names is important.  Te Waka Pākākano is a seed carrying vessel; this reference is taken from a Ngāi Tahu ngeri, a chant for launching a waka or canoe, Terea te Waka, that tells of the voyage of the waka Uruao from its ancestral homelands to Te Waipounamu.  It refers to the dispersal of peoples through the Pacific, and by extension to all those who have come to make their home here in Te Waipounamu.

It also references the whakataukī: “E kore au e ngaro, he kākano i ruia mai i Rangi-ātea”; I will never disappear, a seed dispersed from Rangi-ātea, which honours the diverse origins of the members of the UC community, and our resilience to thrive.

The title for the role of AVC Māori, Pacific and Equity, Te Amokapua Pākākano, is based on the name of the unit.  At UC the term ‘amokapua’ is given to those leaders with the title Assistant Vice-Chancellor.

Celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2019 Maori Language Week at the UC RECCENTRE

To celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2019 Maori Language Week at the UC RecCentre for 9 – 15 September, we’ve got some neat stuff for you to try.

Try a FREE Spin Class taught entirely in Te Reo. Join Huhana-Suzanne Carter on Wednesday 11 September at 10.30am, for a special Spin class, taught entirely in Te Reo. This class is open to anyone who’d like to try it, whether you’re a member of the RecCentre or not. No fees, just bring your staff or student ID and sign in at the gate.

Free Stuff for the WHOLE WEEK!
Need a towel? No sweat! Would you like to spin for free? Excellent. Just ask for either of these in Māori, and we’ll loan it to you absolutely free. Both offers valid all week, and all attempts rewarded.

He tāora mōku – Can I have a towel please? Watch a video
He pāhi eke pahikara māku – Can I have a spin token please? Watch a video

Head to our UC Rec&Sport youtube page (or use the direct links above) and hear Stacey Niao, one of our awesome team members, speak the questions in Te Reo.

Kia pai tō wiki!
UC Rec&Sport

Matariki 2016

One of the most significant events in the Māori calendar is Matariki, the indigenous New Year.

Matariki can be translated in two ways – Mata Riki (Tiny Eyes) and Mata Ariki (eyes of God). The Matariki star cluster can be seen from all parts of the world and is commonly known as Pleiades. This star cluster disappears below the horizon in April and reappears in the north-eastern pre-dawn sky in late May or early June, marking the start of a new year. Celebrations most often occur at the next new moon after Matariki has risen.

Mr Rakihia Tau, the late Upoko of Ngāi Tūāhūriri, spoke to Mr Richard Liddicoat of the Christchurch City Council in July 2008 about the significance of Matariki, from a southern Māori historical perspective as well as whānau and personal perspectives.

This kōrero was recorded and is able to be read and listened to via this link. This korero is an exceptional explanation of the importance of Matariki as the start of a new year; noting the changes in the natural world, particularly the changes noted by food gatherers and hunters. It is the time for planning the next year’s activities; a time for wānanga; a time for hui and strengthening of whānau and hapu social bonds.

Today Matariki means celebrating the unique place in which we live and giving respect to the whenua we live on. It is a special time to celebrate the customs, art and uniqueness of Māori culture. It is the coming together of whānau and friends and of sharing each other’s skills, achievements and history. There is storytelling, song and dance, carving and weaving, ancient ceremonies and passing on of knowledge and history. Throughout Matariki we learn about those who came before us: whakapapa, whānau, iwi – our history, our family, our ancestors.

Matariki signals growth. It’s a time of change, a time to prepare and a time of action. During Matariki we acknowledge what we have and what we have to give. Matariki celebrates the diversity of life. It’s a celebration of culture, language, spirit and people.

Celebrations in Ōtautahi Christchurch include:
Whānau Fun Day at Rehua Marae 10.00 am – 4.00 pm

Maahunui II.

The new wharenui at Tuahiwi which the late RakihiaTau was instrumental in creating.