Tag Archives: Māori

If Your Macrons Stop Working

From time to time I find my macrons suddenly stop working.
This is almost certainly because I have accidentally hit the Windows key + space bar, which is the shortcut to switch the keyboard input method from the Māori keyboard that I usually use, back to the US keyboard.

To correct this:
Press Windows key + space bar to switch it back
or…

1. Click the keyboard input language button, located at the far right end of your taskbar (in the bottom right corner of your monitor/screen).
It looks like this:

 

 

2. Then click English (New Zealand) Maori keyboard.

To use Macrons, see my Tech Tip Type Using Macrons.


For other great time-saving tips, look up:
Being more efficient with your technology
Technology Information for Staff website

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Got some suggestions? Please leave a comment below or let me know.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

First Nations’ Futures Programme Scholarships Open Now!

The First Nations’ Futures Programme provides an unique opportunity for aspiring Ngāi Tahu leaders and other Māori postgraduate students to gain access to leading international research and thinking within a specifically indigenous context.

The First Nations’ Futures Programme is held at Stanford University for two weeks in October/November.

Stanford University Grounds

Applications are also invited from Ngāi Tahu and other Māori undergraduate students who are close to completion of their degree and who intend to apply for postgraduate study in 2019-2020.

The closing date for expressions of interest is 31 May, 2019.

Submitting your application:

  1. Download the 2019 FNFP Application Form and Guidelines from the website here>
  2. Email the completed application form with a copy of your CV and relevant supporting documentation to: kirsty.ameriks@canterbury.ac.nz and cc ntrc@canterbury.ac.nz
  3. Applications must be received by Friday 31 May 2019

For more information refer to the website or email ntrc@canterbury.ac.nz

Professional development – putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga

John Kapa, Kapoipoi, Student Development Advisor Māori  explains the significance of putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga, including an opportunity for professional development. 

Putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga – Wednesday 14 November, 1.30pm-3.30pm

This is a workshop co-ordinated by the Professional Learning Community of in-house trainers.
Places are limited – if you would like to attend, please contact the Learning & Development team requesting an invitation (with the location) to be sent to you.

Relationships are important. The idea of AU (I) is more than being individualistic, rather it is also the strength of connection and working as a collective found in whakawhanAUngatanga. Whakawhanaungatanga is the act of and is the process of establishing links, making connections and relating to the people one meets by identifying in culturally appropriate ways, whakapapa linkages, past heritages, points of engagement, or other relationships.

In a metaphoric sense, Mead (2003) asserts that whanaungatanga reaches beyond actual whakapapa relationships and includes relationships to people who are not kin but who, through shared experiences, feel and act as kin.

Exploring this further, this session looks at your self-identified attributes around whanaungatanga to identify touch points and how this could be applied positively at work with peers or with ākonga (students) for example. This will be undertaken through exercises and pūrakau (stories).

 


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

Whakanuia Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2018

E ngā manu taki, e ngā manu tāiko o Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha, tēnā koutou.

Kua takoto anō tēnei mānuka ki a tātou i tēnei wiki, e Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – nau mai, tauti mai! Ka hiki tātou i tēnei wero kia rere te reo ki ngā kokonga katoa o tēnei whare wānanga. Nā reira e te whānau whānui o UC, hīkina te mānuka, tukua te reo Māori kia hāro ki tōna keokeonga!  Karawhiua!

Greetings to everyone here at UC.

Māori Language Week is back and so too is the opportunity for us all to use, embrace and value te reo Māori in all that we do.  Over this next week I am encouraging all of you to welcome this challenge by getting involved and participating in some of the great reo Māori events and initiatives which will be taking place here on campus. Take up the challenge and support the use of te reo Māori so that it will soar across all areas of our university!  Go for it!

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha will celebrate Te Wiki o te Reo Māori, from 11  to 16 Rima (September). The theme this year is Kia kaha te reo Māori , let the Māori language be strong. This supports the intent of the new partnerships for te reo Māori revitalisation between the Crown and Māori under the new Māori Language Act 2016.  Read the programme here>

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori is one week of our  year where we can show how we support and value the Māori language here at UC by using the reo we have while supporting others to do the same.  Don’t be shy – get involved and make the most of the range of reo Māori activities and events happening across our campus this week – kia kaha te reo Māori!

Beyond Te Wiki o te Reo Māori there are many other ways that you can further develop your Māori language skills and deepen your bicultural competence and confidence here at UC, by enrolling to complete a Te Reo Māori course at Aotahi or registering to take part in the Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora and Te Reo Māori for the Workplace workshops. 

Whilst Te Wiki o te Reo Māori provides us with the opportunity to support the value of the Māori language in everything we do, the challenge for us all is to continue using what we have – everyday – on an ongoing basis.

E hoa mā – whakawahā te riri!
Ngā mihi o te wā